DrakeAnubis

Street Light Microcell?

24 posts in this topic

Hey, can somebody please explain to me what this is? It was pretty high up so the pictures aren't as close as I would like them to be. There aren't many of them around, this one is at the end of a dead end street. Anyway, Thanks.

post-8673-1173676825_thumb.jpg

post-8673-1173676906_thumb.jpg

post-8673-1173676938_thumb.jpg

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey, can somebody please explain to me what this is? It was pretty high up so the pictures aren't as close as I would like them to be. There aren't many of them around, this one is at the end of a dead end street. Anyway, Thanks.

I'm probably wrong, so sorry, but, could those be for remote control of the street lights?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I'm not sure, the radio unit is connected to whatever that thing on top of the light is. If that is a light sensor, why is the opening facing out and not up towards the sky... besides I think the lights are on a timer anyway, wouldn't that be more efficient then installing radio units.

Whatever it is, its 900mhz according to the label.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i belive these are for providing wirless internet access, it uses the power from the street light.

I don't think so, its a 900mhz system, and they aren't close enough together... and with the amount of war moving I do I would have noticed that by now.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey look, "IN CASE OF EMERGENCY CALL 800 873 3468"

*dialing...

"You've reached the ricochet emergency network operations center, please stand by for the next available agent" ... that sounds like something that needs to be done from a payphone

FCCID GNW24000: 902.08-927.84MHz Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum (part 15)

Thats interesting...

Edited by Drake Anubis
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wikipedia:

The technology, deployed by Metricom Inc., worked as a wireless mesh network: packets were forwarded by small repeaters (typically mounted on streetlamps, for the use of which Metricom negotiated agreements with municipal governments) and might "bounce" among several such units along the path between an end-user's modem and a wired internet access point; hence the name of the service. The wireless ISP service was an outgrowth of technology Metricom had developed to facilitate remote meter reading for utility companies. It was originally inspired by amateur packet radio, but differed from this technology in many respects: for instance, Ricochet used spread spectrum (FHSS) technology in the low-power "license-free" 900MHz ISM band of the RF spectrum. In addition to the eavesdropping resistance offered by FHSS, modems offered built-in encryption, but this was not turned on by default.

... So its part of a remote meter reading system, so what if you intercepted the signal and rebroadcasted something else

*Goes to get black hat

Edited by Drake Anubis
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to have richochet, but this was years ago..

it was a good idea , but the service was shoddy so we ended up droping it.

altho the boxes on the telephone poles around me looked very different than the pictures posted.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

/me checks poles by his house.

Nope nothing their. :voteno:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was at an RV lake side camping place one time and they had ricochet internet, it was ok.

I'm interested because this isn't the internet service, this is the utility monitoring service, and this is the only unit in the area really which means that this street light must be the nexus of all the street lights in the area (considering that the radio unit is reporting about the entire grid and not the individual light I'm sure), which means that there must be a way to feed the unit other information.

Also I'm interested in what kind of emergencies they predict the unit will be involved in, they felt that it was necessary to setup a 24/7 emergency noc to respond to calls.

Edited by Drake Anubis
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also I'm interested in what kind of emergencies they predict the unit will be involved in, they felt that it was necessary to setup a 24/7 emergency noc to respond to calls.

they probably consider the unit

giving off sparks

dangling by its cord

getting run over by cars

emergencies

:P

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure it isn't just for adjusting the on/off times? Being in a remote location an all. Perhaps they manually alter the setting on one and the settings get transmitted along the chain of lights so there all changed?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sure it isn't just for adjusting the on/off times? Being in a remote location an all. Perhaps they manually alter the setting on one and the settings get transmitted along the chain of lights so there all changed?

Yes, I explored the lighting grid a while ago. The basic area is broken down into a couple logically defined sections (try not to drop an locational specific docs here) and each section has a 'control' station that contains (in an unlocked box) the circut breaker, the timing system (and a small manual explaining how to set the timer), and a light sensor on top of the box. I've played with covering the light sensor (or putting an led throwie on it) and it will change the lighting pattern by a couple hours for that section (but I'm guessing that the timer is what keeps the lights from operating in logically bad times [like even if the sensor is covered with tape the timer stops the lights from staying on all day])

By the way, if anybody is going to make a comment about the location printed on the device label, that location isn't right.... I would be impressed though if somebody managed to se the location of that unit by calling the company or something and referencing the serial number

Edited by Drake Anubis
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

no the on/off times are controlled by a photosensitive cell ontop of the lightpole (i think). this mcdn (microcellular data network) box has nothing to do with the lightpole/lights it is just more cost effective to mount the repeater on a lightpole instead of building towers

ahh i posted right after you drake, its good to see some clarification on my thought, i just wasnt sure about a remote timing unit

Edited by Anolis
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
no the on/off times are controlled by a photosensitive cell ontop of the lightpole (i think).

Yeah, I just explained, right before you posted, that each section has a photosensitive cell.

has nothing to do with the lightpole/lights

From what I understand so far, it does. Ricochet makes internet wireless internet services based off their old municipal services, this is one of the older units that was providing information, not one of the newer units providing internet (or a relay for).

EDIT: Yeah, i see you just changed your post while I was responding to it

Edited by Drake Anubis
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

its very possible that covering the photocell during irregular times would cause the unit to send error codes to the main control box and then onto the l/p comany

lol thinking about it, when i was a little kid.. about 10 years ago.. i thought that the antenas on the poles were pull strings to turn them on and off

Edited by Anolis
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What I should do is get a frequency counter and check it a couple times to see if it is constantly transmitting (or lucky enough to be transmitting at the time that I am there). I'll see if I can find one in the next couple weeks, I'll let you guys know if I find anything.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In "Freedom Downtime" Eric Corley asks his friend if he brought his ricochet modem with him, his friend replies no, (this was in the part where they are outside of the sun microsystems office, or was it novell) i cant remember

but apparently they were using the ricochet network?

Edited by Anolis
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had put together a presentation for HOPE last year (which I didn't end up giving :P) that covered electronic metering and control systems utilities use. The docs I had covered other types of radio systems (i.e., paging recievers hooked to load management switches, private two-way microwave, etc.), but I don't recall seeing Ricochet as an option. I'll do some looking and see what I can find out.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'll do some looking and see what I can find out.

I would love to know if you find out anything.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now