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Aghaster

Linux to Other UNIX

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I recently bought a new laptop, it is a refurbished one. Here's the page that describes it.

It came with Windows Media Center 2005. It is my only genuine copy of Windows, so I decided to keep it, and shrink the ntfs partition. The hard disk has 120gb, so I shrinked the windows partition to 50gigs, make a 50gig partition for Linux Slackware and I now dual boot with Lilo. I'm configuring my stuff in my kernel, but it's a bit hard as I am still not familiar with the hardware components it has, and the spec sheets given for the laptop only gives performance and capacity for pieces, no manufacturers and model numbers.

So, I still have 20gig left. I wanted to install Solaris 10 on it, but it looks like the installer has some problems with it. I'll maybe still try to mess with it. However, I'd like to know, which UNIX should I try? I've heard much of Solaris and FreeBSD, but are there others that I really should know about and that would probably work on my laptop?

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I'd say just play around and put a different one on there every few days heh. I've messed around with Solaris and BSD a bit, and I can't see myself using Solaris for normal desktop use in that it seems that Sun went out of their way to overcomplicate a bunch of stuff (for example, to add a user in linux you'd put "adduser suchandsuch" but to add a user in Solaris its "useradd -d /home/suchandsuch -m -s /bin/bash suchandsuch", easy to see which is simpler). Solaris also has a problem in that the hardware support is pretty bad, if you are having trouble with hardware support on linux don't expect it to work on Solaris, and it doesn't enjoy dual booting (although I haven't attempted that in a while). Oh, and Solaris has no package management, which I've been spoiled to expect using linux. I have used BSD for normal desktop use, but it seemed to me that occasionally when I had a problem and asked other BSD users about it, they would say "oh, thats just the way it is, live with it", so I decided to go back to linux.

I guess what I'm trying to say here is that you probably will not find yourself liking the OS you put on the 20 gig partition as much as you like Windows and Linux, but then again maybe I'm just picky. I think it would be an interesting experience to install all kinds of random stuff like plan 9, HP-UX, inferno, Syllable, etc on there and just change it up every so often though.

*hides from pack of rabid BSD and Solaris users*

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Oh, and Solaris has no package management, which I've been spoiled to expect using linux.

OR IT DOES: http://www.blastwave.org/

check around maybe before spreading wrong information?

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Oh, and Solaris has no package management, which I've been spoiled to expect using linux.

OR IT DOES: http://www.blastwave.org/

check around maybe before spreading wrong information?

dude, blastwave really really rocks. I agree with you, that guy who said there was no package management for Solaris didn't know what he was talking about. I'm downloading opensolaris (b56) atm, I'm going to try to install it on my laptop.

And as for the useradd thing, I think it's quite a futile argument too.

solaris useradd man page

I've done it once... it was as easy as on Linux. See this older and simple post I made about it...

Edited by Aghaster
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zfs+zones=crazy delicious

its all about the hamiltions baby

seriously though, dont use it as a desktop: k?

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Oh, and Solaris has no package management, which I've been spoiled to expect using linux.

OR IT DOES: http://www.blastwave.org/

check around maybe before spreading wrong information?

Debian - has apt by default

Suse - has yast by default

Gentoo - has portage by default

Solaris - does not have blastwave by default

(slackware also has a similar problem)

I like having my package management actually officially backed by the OS I'm using thank you very much.

Also the useradd thing was just one example, there are numerous other problems with the OS in just the fact that if something could be overcomplicated then it was, its no wonder Sun's stock is in the trash heap right now.

Although yeah, using it as a desktop might have been my mistake.

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Solaris is quite nice, but I would recommend FreeBSD. Its very powerful and yet not extremely hard to manage. And you learn a lot from messing around with it. I use it mostly as a shell for irssi and a firewall, but its a really fun OS.

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What difference does it make, which OS is used?

Unless you are attempting to use Solaris for some specific reason, why not use Win32, Linux or Mac OS X as a desktop OS.

For servers, BSD is tops.

For programmers, kernel designers, etc, Solaris, BSD are on top.

For usability with maintainability, Linux and Mac OS X are rising up.

For pathetic things, Win32.

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hai! All pheer teh FreeVMS. (I no it's nawt UniX kthx)

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Why not set up that extra 20 GB partition as a physical disk under VMware? Then you can play around with your other OSes while still using either Windows or Linux.

You could poke around with BeOS (not sure how maintained that is anymore) or Plan 9, for fun.

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If you want something different instead of the same-old, same-old, try Plan 9 from Bell Labs. Although not exactly UNIX, it was created by the same guys as a next-generation UNIX.

And who dual boots anymore? Virtual machines, baby!

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if you're looking into BSD, I really like NetBSD with pkgsrc. I had netbsd running on my laptop for a while, but there are no drivers for my wireless card (not even with ndis), so I switched to Ubuntu after Ubuntu had supported drivers (about a month ago, when 7.10 was released). For everything but my laptop, I really prefer NetBSD as it is fast, stable, and (for me) easy to use.

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I've pretty much switched over to OS X for all of my activities since I bought my MacBook recently, with some VMs of Ubuntu and XP for things that absolutely have to be done in them (far less than I imagined, though I'll probably use a Linux server in a VM more often once I get the 4 gigs of RAM I just ordered).

I'm really loving it: A good solid Unix OS with a very well designed user interface. It's great for general web/email tasks and is a really enjoyable development environment too (Xcode is the IDE to finally tear me away from the screen-full of vim's and shells that was my usual environment).

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Solaris - does not have blastwave by default

(slackware also has a similar problem)

I like having my package management actually officially backed by the OS I'm using thank you very much.

I beg to differ: http://www.slackware.com/config/packages.php

Also the useradd thing was just one example, there are numerous other problems with the OS in just the fact that if something could be overcomplicated then it was, its no wonder Sun's stock is in the trash heap right now.

Although yeah, using it as a desktop might have been my mistake.

useradd has its benefits. adduser is just a quick way to add a new limitted user, with the benefit of small convenience. The user is set up with all the defaults, so you still then need to modify any extra groups and such either way. (media access, printing, etc) Hence the reason you find useradd and adduser in most Linux distros. Plus, I like one-liners. ;)

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wow... this thread was almost a year old, and was revived.

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i was gonna multiboot my laptop but i decided to stick with a full hd install of ubuntu, solaris isnt great considering i dont think getting my atheros card would work my 10/100 card mught not work either linux is just too compatible with most hardware, now inside a virtual machine i might run it just to play around but... im still learning nixing

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I can't stop thinking about that number, 20 GB.

There was an article in the back of the current 2600 about using the DD command to swap many compressed operating systems in and out of a 10 GB partition. Looks like you may want to try this. You could install solaris, copy it to a zip file, install freebsd, copy it to a zip file, and uncompress and reverse the process to switch back and forth.

Let's see, 2600 V 24 # 4 p. 58, "booting many compressed environments on a laptop." Maybe you want to do something like that?

---

Deepgeek

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