crotchlobster

programming languages

38 posts in this topic

which one is easiest or was easiest for you to learn?

i cant decide which one to start with

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Most people start with python. http://www.python.org/download/ and theres tons of documentation on it online.

Then most go to C then to C++, then perl. Start where you like in the chain or go for another not on my list, but a bit of advice. The more you try to skip ahead the harder it is to learn, and the more confused you get. Eventually you end up back at square one with python.

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I started out using the command line and writing batch files for nearly everything. Then I started using vb6. I've been using vb6 for a few years and now i am slowly going towards c++

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I would start with Ruby, and that's not just because I'm a Rubyist. It's a good alternative to Python, which can be inconsistent at times. There's no shortage of books on how to program with Ruby, so that's not a problem. The only hurdle there really is to learning Ruby or Python is object oriented concepts. In addition to books on your chosen language, you should seek out a book that teaches object oriented concepts well. I recommend Bruce Eckel's "thinking in" series, which are free dowloads on mindview.net. Strive to understand all concepts, don't get hung up on memorizing syntax and method names. Concepts is the most important part in the beginning.

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VB is the easiest.

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VB6 is dead easy to learn, but it teaches rather bad habits when moving into another language, even though i got started on C++ I took two years to do vb6 and get involved in a few big VB projects, now it is very hard for me to move back to C++ ( I'm slowly breaking the habits i've acquired through vb )

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There's just no reason to learn VB anymore either, so you can avoid the whole thing altogether. I've never coded anything seriously with VB, but from the little I've seen, it's something to avoid. For example, VB does a number of things to prevent people from getting "confused" like starting array indecies (indexes?) at 1 instead of 0. All this does is confuse the hell out of anyone else reading the code. To make matters worse, you can start arrays from 1 or 0, it's configurable. In short, you just never really know where your arrays start.

The entire philosophy behind VB is broken. You don't conform the language to the programmer's misconcetions and lack of understanding. If you do that, you're doomed from the getgo.

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I would actually recommend starting with a more difficult language. I'd say to start with C++ because C/C++ is somewhat of a standard and once you are able to code well in C++ everything else you learn (besides assembly) seems a easier. I originally learned C and when I learned a second language (python) it came very easily to me after coding in C for about a year. I would say C++ instead of C because C++ will get you working with object oriented programming.

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I probably wouldn't start with C++. It's not the easiest language to learn, especially if you're just staring on OO concepts at the same time. The dynamic languages (Python, Ruby) are much more forgiving and easier to learn (just plain easier to code with), if you're going to start with a high-level language, you might as well start as high as you can go.

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To make matters worse, you can start arrays from 1 or 0, it's configurable.

Actually they can start with whatever you want

Public MyArray(4 To 8) As Integer

defines an int array with indexes 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 :P

Don't Learn VB6 first! if at all!

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which one is easiest or was easiest for you to learn?

i cant decide which one to start with

all depens what you want to do. I taught myself the basics of html with microsopht frontpage and a sit that closed down call funky chicked. Now there is a student site called web monkey. I am still learning C++ and q basic. VB is really fun cause you can do it in work. I like to use programming languages that you dont need a program for. Try html for you basic web design then moove to java, then you can use programs or learn xml which is alot like html and learn dhtml all the same thing in a way thought.

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I started with batch files, then MS-DOS Qbasic, then assembly language (yes, I know, big skip ahead...shoulda done C first...)

But don't do that

I think a natural progression is:

1) Start with a very high level language, like Python or Ruby (dare I say a traditional BASIC? [not visual]), just to get yourself acquainted with the logic

2) Move onto something like Java or dare I say Pascal

3) Finally, explore things like C, C++, etc. If you feel daring, go with Assembly language.

-512

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I started to program is c initially before I knew what a kernel and linux was all about. I found it a little too difficult for my taste, because of the semantics. I spent time learning about what different languages were out there, and what was their primary purpose(if any). There's a radio show out of the UK that is very useful in distinguishing the usefulness of most languages, high-level & low-level explaining why they are called so, etc.

My advice is that you start with PERL. If you run linux, you have perl most likely and if not, then go to activestate.com and download activeperl for windows. At search.cpan.org you can search for modules that extend the functionality of the language to fit your particular need. Another plus with perl is that you do not have to explicitly define variables as perl distinguishes numbers from strings transparently.

check out lifeinhex - Programming Rails http://lifeinhex.com/episodes/lifeinhex013.mp3

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I started out with C++ and it was abit much at first, but it gets easier. I then moved on to Python. If I could start over I would have done it the other way around, so that my advice; python then C++. After you have mastered them, any language should be quite easy.

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My advice is that you start with PERL. *snip* Another plus with perl is that you do not have to explicitly define variables as perl distinguishes numbers from strings transparently.

Perl is really not really a beginner's language. It would be OK, but there are some big reasons to stay away from it in the beginning (or at all). It's so easily abused (and it is regularly abused which seems to be acceptable behavior in the Perl community, in fact it's encouraged), that it's difficult to tell the good code from the bad. Newbies that learn from code can pick up some pretty bad habits brought on by lazy (or "clever" as it's called in the Perl community) Perl programmers. Also, "there's more than one way to do ti" is not terribly useful to someone just learning their first paradigm, and neither is CPAN.

And the thing about declaring variables is really not an issue. Learning to declare your variables is such a small hurdle, it shouldn't be a deciding factor in choosing a language.

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In the beginning, efficient code is the result of fine-tuned logic, just try and master one language, then pick up some books about coding in a secure but efficient manner.

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I'd suggest Python. I started with C++, and was baffled. Python is easy to read, and if you are having trouble, you can psuedocode and ask someone for help. (Psuedocoding is writing out the basic functions of your program in plain English then translating. Very easy to do in Python, due to the readability.)

Also, get a book on the language you choose. There's nothing better than having a hard copy of the info you need, available without switching windows on your computer to check how to print "Hello world."

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I actually prefer electronic reference documentation. Alt-tab is just not that difficult. For a lot of reading though, hard copy is a lot easier on the eyes.

Edit: 2 monitors really helps with that as well.

Edited by Ohm
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I learnt java first. reason being its a clean straight forward high level language that involves all OO concepts and a wealth of API. i then learnt vb so i could develop quick and dirty apps.

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I actually prefer electronic reference documentation. Alt-tab is just not that difficult. For a lot of reading though, hard copy is a lot easier on the eyes.

Edit: 2 monitors really helps with that as well.

or laptop and desktop running together is what i use

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