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Distro War

   48 members have voted

  1. 1. where do ya fit in?

    • White hat
      2
    • Black Hat
      5
    • Gray Hat
      17
    • I don't wear any fukking hats.
      20

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84 posts in this topic

I am interested in what everyone thinks of the major distrobutions. The major distobutions are going to be the top 10 at distrowatch.com

1. Ubuntu

2. Mandriva Linux

3. SUSE LINUX

4. Fedora Core

5. Debian GNU/Linux

6. Knoppix

7. MEPIS Linux

8. Gentoo Linux

9. Slackware Linux

10. Xandros Desktop

Whitch of these do you think are the best? And give a rational, logical reason why this distro is good, and why it isn't.

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I’m a Debian man but I also use Gentoo as for Xandros, Ubuntu, Knoppix, MEPIS there just the bastard children of Debian.

Slackware is OK and Fedora and SUSE are reasonable, as for Mandriva well that's a piece of shit.

Edited by m3747r0n
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Whitch of these do you think are the best? And give a rational, logical reason why this distro is good, and why it isn't.

I’m a Debian man but I also use Gentoo as for Xandros, Ubuntu, Knoppix, MEPIS there just the bastard children of Debian.

Slackware is OK and Fedora and SUSE are reasonable, as for Mandriva well that's a piece of shit.

Hmm...

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There is no best, just what you like, they all use the Linux kernel. I like Debian because I’ve been using it for years and I can do a minimal install and just apt-get the shit I need. Gentoo is great but unless your going to use distributed compiling, it takes a lot of time to install on old hardware.

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I like Slackware because I can make it as loaded or as slimmed down as I want. Internet-based package getting tools for it could use some work though (mostly slapt-get not resolving dependencies). Still, it's minimal, but not so minimal that it's a pain to get up and running.

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I have to agree with m3747r0n (I've noticed myself doing that a lot lately) about the fact that no distro is the best. It is definitely a matter of what is best for the person, application, hardware, or circumstance. When first trying to get in to linux I tried redhat and didn't like it, then I installed slack but never got it to network and had no help. Eventually I ended up in a bad situation with no computer and Nexis donated me an old box that had Debian on it. I had my crash course in debian at about 7am after a long night of drinking and then he headed home. With debian I was always learning, finding cool new things, and most of all coming to love the distro. Since then I've played with other stuff but I always am happiest with Debian. As I always say, for the beginner I suggest Ubuntu which is just debian's bastard little brother who cheats on all his exams (imho). If anything speaks for debians greatness it has to be that the bulk of the time when someone tells me that blah distro is better than debian, it's usually a debian based distro

I have a lot of respect for Slackware but I just don't think it is right for me on a personal level, it would make a great server and it works especially well on all the boxes at work. Since March when we moved in to this facility I can only think of maybe 3 out 100 boxes that have been rebooted and the only reason was because they were either moved or had to have hardware replaced. 97 boxes with 100% uptime for 7 months is a definite sign of a work horse OS to me. These boxes are also in use 24/7 as our facility never closes and is always staffed.

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I'm gonna put my opinion on Ubuntu in here...

The best thing about Ubuntu is the fact that Ubuntu compatable with may types of hardware. Ubuntu has a GUI tool for every CLI tool, which is a good thing, becuase you get an option, but it is also a bad thing, becuse you don't learn as much as if you had only CLI tools. The way Ubuntu detects hardware is amazing. I will plug a usb mouse into my laptop, and Ubuntu will know it is there. Though it isn't a good habit to learn. Ubuntu also has hunderds of packages located in thier Synaptic Package Manager. But the downfall to that is that you don't have to learn how to compile a package. It has exellent documentation, but that means you don't have to read a readme.txt file, or a man page.

Overall Ubuntu is too user freindly by defualt to learn something. Though you can make it so you do. And it does alot for you, so you don't learn too much.

I'll say stuff about other distros soon.

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slackware simply becuase while its small, it comes with everything u need, and it teaches u about linux like gentoo but without having to spend as much time getting it up

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lol I tried install gentoo on one pc and It took all night(left it on all night) to get half way done compiling and its an ok speed pc, where it took slackware about 1 and a half hours

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All distros are for n00bs! LFS 4 LYF! :P

If you are really 1337x0rz, LSF+customkernel

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All distros are for n00bs! LFS 4 LYF! :P

If you are really 1337x0rz, LSF+customkernel

Actually, I am currently slowly working on linux from scratch.

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Been using Slackware for about two years now. Am loving it more than anything I've tried before.

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Been using Slackware for about two years now. Am loving it more than anything I've tried before.

Slackware of course, you just can't beat it's simplicity.

Besides, it is the only distro which is trying to do things Unix way.

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Been using Slackware for about two years now. Am loving it more than anything I've tried before.

Slackware of course, you just can't beat it's simplicity.

Besides, it is the only distro which is trying to do things Unix way.

If you like UNIX use Solaris, HP-UX, AIX, IRIX or try Plan9, BSD, MINIX and OSX. I find it odd when people say they use Slackware because it’s very UNIX like.

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For a desktop distro I've been a heavy Ubuntu user for the last half year. I used to hate FC with a passion, because of Yum, but having played around with FC 5 & 6 a bit I'm turning into a bit of a fan. It just feels like a very mature and stable distro. I still hate Yum, with a passion.

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Been using Slackware for about two years now. Am loving it more than anything I've tried before.

Slackware of course, you just can't beat it's simplicity.

Besides, it is the only distro which is trying to do things Unix way.

If you like UNIX use Solaris, HP-UX, AIX, IRIX or try Plan9, BSD, MINIX and OSX. I find it odd when people say they use Slackware because it’s very UNIX like.

Slackware is the most Unix like Linux distro; that most know of. (A semi colon was supposed to go there, right?)

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If you like UNIX use Solaris, HP-UX, AIX, IRIX or try Plan9, BSD, MINIX and OSX. I find it odd when people say they use Slackware because it’s very UNIX like.

Well, I have Solaris on my Sun Ultra box and I was multibooting for some time with FreeBSD and OpenBSD.

Still I find Linux most satisfactory solution for my desktop needs.

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Debian (and derivatives) for one reason: apt-get! It definitely makes a better impression than anything else I have tried (not much I will admit). Ubuntu is ok for most users who don't want to learn, but if you want to learn Debian all the way!

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Debian (and derivatives) for one reason: apt-get! It definitely makes a better impression than anything else I have tried (not much I will admit). Ubuntu is ok for most users who don't want to learn, but if you want to learn Debian all the way!

But apt-get is more, let me do this for you, then compiling by sources. Though compiling by sources can be just be as easy. Just have to type a little more.

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I installed Ubuntu for my little brother on his computer yesterday. Gosh it did improve A LOT since I've installed it the first time. The first version of Ubuntu I installed was 5.4, at the time the installer was pretty much like the debian installer. I installed 6.10 for my little brother, and it was like just as easy as booting from CD, waiting for it to load, clicking the installer icon, answering a couple of questions and voila. I automatically detected Windows and added to grub. It even proposed to resize the ntfs partition and take the freed space to install itself!

I think we've reached a point where Linux can be very noob friendly. I'm surprised. I may have passed too much time away from "noob distros".

In my case, if slackware didn't have this lack of available packages, I'd say it rocks.

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I installed Ubuntu for my little brother on his computer yesterday. Gosh it did improve A LOT since I've installed it the first time. The first version of Ubuntu I installed was 5.4, at the time the installer was pretty much like the debian installer. I installed 6.10 for my little brother, and it was like just as easy as booting from CD, waiting for it to load, clicking the installer icon, answering a couple of questions and voila. I automatically detected Windows and added to grub. It even proposed to resize the ntfs partition and take the freed space to install itself!

I think we've reached a point where Linux can be very noob friendly. I'm surprised. I may have passed too much time away from "noob distros".

In my case, if slackware didn't have this lack of available packages, I'd say it rocks.

"Once they make someting idiot proof, they make a better idiot."

Funny, the installer has crased before on me. The cd was fine, it worked the next few tries.

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hi

er, how about the bsd variants? im a freebsd user at the moment, but as soon as i am competent enough i am moving onto open-bsd. i really think that freebsd is something different. i have used slackware, fedora core, SuSe, live distros. and i think freebsd is hard to migrate to, but after installing it onto my computer i found my learning and understanding of unix operating systems rocketed. before linux would sort everything out for my, install the gui, auto mount everything and install all the packages that come with it.

but as soon as i migrated to freebsd i learned to because i had to, mount everything manually in a command console, write my own xorg.conf, add packages manually. now if the system didnt do what it is supposed to do, then i can do it manually and find out if its the xserver or system not doing it properly and i can do it myself.

maybe im jus talking alot of gibberish cos im still abit tired when im writing this.

and also i saw nobody really mention the bsd variants so i thought id give bsd a mention cos i think it does deserve a mention atleast.

anyone agree? :roll:

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The reason I didn't put bsd on the list is becuase it wasn't in teh top 10 in distro watch. It was 11th.

I might actually look into bsd, it heard it is fast, stable, and secure. Do you agree?

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