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VanRude

"Old" power supply to run cold cathodes.

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I have a power supply(Mitac SPU-75) that came out of my grandfather's old computer. My room mate and I want to power three or four cold cathodes sets with it. My room mate knows more about electronic hardware than me, and could explain it better, but basically we know we have to trick it into thinking a motherboard is present, and we know which cables are supposed to connect to the motherboard. We know which wires have which signal, but we cant get the lights, or power supply fan, to stay on for more than 5 seconds at a time. We'v tries connecting the power ground to everything, we tried a bunch of stuff that wound up with some fun shocks, and a paperclip in the place of the fuse.

Can anyone help?

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It's a 1997 power supply from a Compaq, that ran 95. I consider 9 years old to be old. I probobally wouldn't be able to make sense of that link, but my room mate could, I'll ask him when he gets back from work.

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Sounds kinds cool. I would stick the light in a tower of CD's for a bitchen light.

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Sounds kinds cool. I would stick the light in a tower of CD's for a bitchen light.

We don't have that many CDs, and I fear we will never get this thing working.

You think there may be a minimum load required to keep it going?

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Hit up wal-mart a few times a week for those free AOL cd's. Get some use out of them.

Really though what's happening? If the PSU is 'faked' into thinking it has a MOBO attached and nothing happens the PSU may be dead.

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Sounds kinds cool. I would stick the light in a tower of CD's for a bitchen light.

We don't have that many CDs, and I fear we will never get this thing working.

You think there may be a minimum load required to keep it going?

If yuo do get it working post some pics up here.

In the mean time maybe a photo of the power supply could help us see a problem.

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Hit up wal-mart a few times a week for those free AOL cd's. Get some use out of them.

Really though what's happening? If the PSU is 'faked' into thinking it has a MOBO attached and nothing happens the PSU may be dead.

Our problem is that we don't know how to 'fake' a motherboard with this power supply.

We have 2 connections to the motherboard,

The first connector has; ground, ground, -12v, +12v, +5v, and power ground

on the second one we have; +5v, +5v, +5v, -5v, ground, ground

We found something online that said powerground turned to +5v when voltage stabilized, so we tried grounding it, and we tried connecting it to -5v. Before that we had read it wrong and connected it to +5v, which resulted in the fan turning on, and the lights turning on for about 5 seconds, then it just shut down.

I'll get pictures the next time my room mate is in, cause I aint gots no camera.

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Hit up wal-mart a few times a week for those free AOL cd's. Get some use out of them.

Really though what's happening? If the PSU is 'faked' into thinking it has a MOBO attached and nothing happens the PSU may be dead.

Our problem is that we don't know how to 'fake' a motherboard with this power supply.

We have 2 connections to the motherboard,

The first connector has; ground, ground, -12v, +12v, +5v, and power ground

on the second one we have; +5v, +5v, +5v, -5v, ground, ground

We found something online that said powerground turned to +5v when voltage stabilized, so we tried grounding it, and we tried connecting it to -5v. Before that we had read it wrong and connected it to +5v, which resulted in the fan turning on, and the lights turning on for about 5 seconds, then it just shut down.

I'll get pictures the next time my room mate is in, cause I aint gots no camera.

Here

Droops gave a good link too. As long as you know the wires that were connected to the board, you "trick" the supply by putting in a resistor. You DO need to double or triple check the wires though and that is why I posted the link. It goes into a little more depth on which wires you need to isolate. If you don't get the right ones, you can blow out the power ( since you don't have a fuse). Otherwise it will keep turning off automatically.

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i have done this, and it worked for me, i had a 12v cathode lamp that was sposed to go in a car adapter for 31337 looking pimp rides, but i have no car. I also power my Netgear 14 port switch from an old power supply, and a 5 port Linksys hub, the inner two are used to power the 5v hub, the outer two power the netgear switch. :)

heres pix

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m281/tr...06/DSC01280.jpg

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m281/tr...06/DSC01272.jpg

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m281/tr...06/DSC01279.jpg

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m281/tr...06/DSC01278.jpg

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m281/tr...06/DSC01277.jpg

heres the light

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m281/tr...06/DSC01525.jpg

Edited by trevelyn
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Well, we gave up on that power supply, and wound up finding another from a kid in the room below us. We currently have 2 UVs on the exterior of the fridge, 1 red in the fridge.

We have to get some speaker wire from ACE hardware or Radioshack so we can run power to blue and green, but I'll try to get pics up of our current setup.

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