arewhyainn

the apache of smtp servers.

15 posts in this topic

I looking on setting me up a SMTP server, for my box. What is the standard of it? Like apache is the standard for the web is there one for SMTP?

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i guess sendmail would be the equivelant of apache. I know some folks are violently opposed to it, but as far as I know it is still the most popular.

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In my opinion mailservers are a pain. I tried sendmail and it wasn't a good one to start off with. Qmail has a few good guides out there so you might wanna look in to that. I've never tried Exim though so I wont comment on that. I suggest Qmail if its your first time.

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I would highly suggest Postfix. Exim is OK, we use it at work. Sendmail is just a PITA to even set up let alone get working right with ESMTP specs.

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sendmail has many exploits to it the standard is postfix now instead of sendmail but apache is also losing ground in the http a bit it seems but most hosting companies use a default build of a distro for hosting.

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sendmail has many exploits to it the standard is postfix now instead of sendmail but apache is also losing ground in the http a bit it seems but most hosting companies use a default build of a distro for hosting.

First, Apache is number ONE, and will always be number one, If you think it's losing ground then your stupid. Most deflaults of any distro have apache in them. Apache is on over 90%+ of all web servers.

I like to say thanks for everyone's help like always, I'm going to use sendmail or postfix. It dose seem from what I gether that sendmail is the most popular, I'd find it very hard to believe that is has "many exploits" in it.

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You are right. Netcraft does not scan the entire internet. Polls don't poll every person in a given demographic, they never do. It's the closest we have to that though. I guess that is until I take your suggestion and scan the entire internet. I'll get right on that.

In addition to that survey, one was recently conducted on the Fortune 1000. The top 1000 companies in the world use IIS 54% of the time. Now, I can't believe I am saying this, since I use Apache exclusively. It's a fact though. I was addressing the comment "If you think apache is losing ground you are stupid", and only that. I like Apache, like pretty much all _good_ OSS choices, it is superior in every way. When Godaddy switched to IIS though, that alone cost apache 1.8 million hostnames IIRC. Apache is losing ground, and anyone who tells you otherwise is deluding themselves. Microsoft has anywhere from 20-35% of the server market, depending on who you ask. The question is how to get those hostnames back?

Before you say the godaddy stat is padded by parked hostnames, you can find many many more parked hostnames on apache servers. Not to mention the fact that 90% of the porn sites that make up most of the web running apache does not make it a superior product. It is superior for other reasons. That is, until you need to run an intranet and want to use things like Sharepoint, Email web access and MS Project. That is where IMO IIS shines. Of course it is a pain in the ass to make and keep secure, and costs a fortune.

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I was scanning as I always do, and I rescanned my subnet from my ISP and found no one using sendmail. I also scanned port 80 and 8080 for web and only found one computer using IIS and found ten servers running apache. Now when I scanne port 80 and 8080 I come across alot of people's routers, Now, on those routes is a small httpd running the configuration page for the router. Would I count those as web (http) servers? They are? Now I found around 86 router with the httpd running, and only found 13 server running a web site. Where do you drew line, because everyone and their dog has a router those days.

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Where do you drew line

Where would I drew a line? I wouldn't. Most routers don't use Apache as their web server, due to space requirements.

on those routes is a small httpd running the configuration page for the router. Would I count those as web (http) servers?

I don't see why not, it is a server serving content out to the web.

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well in that case I would say i made a mistake and apache (just guessing) is only 1% of all the web servers.

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Back on the topic of SMTP servers- I also vote for Postfix. From my personal point of view, Postfix config files are easier to understand (run this question by someone who uses Sendmail, they might object to that).

One important thing I have noticed though- if you're using precompiled packages (IE-rpms or .debs) of either Postfix or Sendmail on a Linux server, they don't seem to coexist happily. Sure, you can set one to run in your /etc/rc.<default runlevel> directory, and set the other to be killed upon start-up of said runlevel (or not start at all), but I've seen some weirdness occur.

I've seen a system with both packages installed insist on using "localhost.localdomain" for it's origin, even though you have Postfix set to be the SMTP server to run at boot with the appropriate origin (the myorigin field) set. Wish I hadn't been under some work constraints to figure out the real root of the problem (my guess is some apps insist on calling "sendmail", or somehow default to trying it for before postfix. Again, not 100% sure.)

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