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freq finding

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yooo guys, whats going on...i re-found my scanner after moving, and im pretty much in the boonies now. so how would i go about finding freqs out here?ive searched the interweb trying to find frequencies and i cant find crap.

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yooo guys, whats going on...i re-found my scanner after moving, and im pretty much in the boonies now.  so how would i go about finding freqs out here?ive searched the interweb trying to find frequencies and i cant find crap.

try www.radioreference.com

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yooo guys, whats going on...i re-found my scanner after moving, and im pretty much in the boonies now.  so how would i go about finding freqs out here?ive searched the interweb trying to find frequencies and i cant find crap.

Everything that's licensed by the FCC can have its frequency data looked up by visiting the General Menu Reports web page. I find that lat/long frequency range request to be the most useful.

As far as technical how-to info is concerned, your best (and free!) source is Ticom 'Zine issue #3.

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yooo guys, whats going on...i re-found my scanner after moving, and im pretty much in the boonies now. so how would i go about finding freqs out here?ive searched the interweb trying to find frequencies and i cant find crap.

Everything that's licensed by the FCC can have its frequency data looked up by visiting the General Menu Reports web page. I find that lat/long frequency range request to be the most useful.

As far as technical how-to info is concerned, your best (and free!) source is Ticom 'Zine issue #3.

Get something with a Signal stalker like feature (Radio Shack Pro 94 has it for sure)

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frequency counters! these little guys are mostly used for figuring out what signals are in circuits, but attach an antenna and you find out whose talking around you! optoelectronics makes a bunch, from simple ones to high end ones with memories and extra features. Their Cub, a simple but tough guy that I own, can be had for <100 bucks if you keep an eye out.

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frequency counters! these little guys are mostly used for figuring out what signals are in circuits, but attach an antenna and you find out whose talking around you! optoelectronics makes a bunch, from simple ones to high end ones with memories and extra features. Their Cub, a simple but tough guy that I own, can be had for <100 bucks if you keep an eye out.

For electronic interception, I would recommend one of the scanners with the Signal Stalker/Close Call feature instead of a frequency counter these days. You can buy a Uniden BC-92 for $100 from Wal-Mart, and its Radio Shack equivilant, the PRO-83, was being sold on clearance for $60-$80.

- Signal Stalkers have shown to be more sensitive than a frequency counter for signal acquisition.

- You are able to lock-out unwanted frequencies.

- They won't constantly hit on continious high-power transmitters such as pagers and broadcasters.

I've used everything over the past 10+ years from the old Radio Shack 1.3 GHz. freq counter to an Optoelectronics Scout Freq. Counter with an Icom R-10 receiver. For the money, one of the Signal Stalker/Close Call police scanners is your best bet if you want to do near-field signal interception.

"Signal Stalker" is Radio Shack's trade name, and "Close Call" is Uniden's (Bearcat). From a functional standpoint they are the same.

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I found the SCOUT Frequency recorder with antenna at the last Dayton Hamvention for $150...not too shabby...

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A lot of indy publications list area by area frequency finds. Search ebay for your area and see if anything shows up. I was extremely surprised to find that some guy was selling old crystals for a bearcat scanner I found in my girlfriend's grandmother's basement which I brought back from the technologically dead.

If your scanner is digital, you might consider connecting a voice recorder to it, setting it to monitor frequencies, and setting the voice recorder to voice activated. Leave this running for a while and you'll get an idea of what sort of freqs you can find.

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A few things that came to mind...

http://www.radioreference.com/ - probably the best site out there for public safety frequency data besides the FCC.

Also, Wal-Mart in this neck of the woods (CT) has the Uniden BC-92 "Close Call" scanner on clearance for $80. The "Close Call" scanners have that near-field frequency detector feature that works extremely well for sleuthing out nearby signals.

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