Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
ruach10

Server

14 posts in this topic

I just bought a new computer and so i now have an 2.0ghz celron box just siting around. I was thinking mabe make it into an server and was wondering what was the best free distro do use.

Edited by ruach10
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, that could take a while, the best free one. For a server I personally go with Debian. I use it for my server, stable, tried and true. A lot of people use the BSD's for servers. OpenBSD prides itself on security, and FreeBSD is a very robust server OS as well. Prepare for 15 answers to that question.

Not to be a spelling nazi, but since you misspelled it twice, maybe you don't know or I am way off base...It is "server", not "sever". I only point it out because it helps to research if you search with the right query. Heh.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, everyone has a different answer for this because everyone is looking for different things. I use debian on my desktop but it seems like a *bsd would be more suitable for server use.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yeah, everyone has a different answer for this because everyone is looking for different things. I use debian on my desktop but it seems like a *bsd would be more suitable for server use.

i agree with evolve in the fact that you will get mupitle different but good answers from different indivudals we all have our own prefrences when it comes to what distros we use but just to add my two cents i have always been a fan of CentOS it's a striped down verison of Red Hat Enterprise and works really well for my home file/ftp/web server

-eth0enigma

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've got it narrowed down to open suse, openbsd, and debian.

Those are all good. Here's my $0.02US:

If you are new to UNIX, go with Suse, because (I presume) a big commercial distro like Suse will come with more hand-holding in the form of documentation and GUI configuration tools than the others. I haven't run Suse, so perhaps I'm wrong here. Also, as you become more expert at UNIX, you'll probably want to move away from GUI configuration tools.

If you're reasonably comfortable with UNIX, then I'd go with openBSD or Debian. If you like to brag about the security of your systems, go with openBSD. I think a reasonably careful admin could make a respectably locked-down system using either distro, but security is openBSD's primary reason for existence. Debian, on the other hand, has a larger community of users, so I suspect it would be easier to find answers to Debian questions by fishing around in your favorite web search engine.

For what it's worth, my only remaining server runs Debian.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a bit of a unix n00b, so I think a am going to with open suse for now mabe down the road when I get better I will switch to debian or open bsd. I have ubuntu installed but I cant get it online for some reason it does not seem to lik emy wireless card.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you want to use the server for? If it's going on a public network (Internet) then I'd definatly recommend OpenBSD. If not then Debian I've always prefered for a server system just because it's very stable and very easy to keep up to date (apt-get update && apt-get upgrade). I've never used BSD, but from what I understand it's a lot harder for newcomers than most linux distros are.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a complete n00b, but it is going to be a internet sever. So should I go with open bsd?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am a complete n00b, but it is going to be a internet sever. So should I go with open bsd?

Alright, so you want a web server I take it. Everyone is going to tell you to go with _____ distro or * bsd. There is no best choice for what you want to do, until you learn and figure out what you want. No matter what it'll be a good learning experience for you. Just pick one, download the ISOs and get started. You'll probably run into snags along the way, but with a little research you'll figure things out. Don't worry about what you start with because over time you'll realize what you like and what you don't like. It is at that time you can decide what flavor of *nix you like the best.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Installing a distro that claims to be secure isn't just going to make you magically invulnerable, don't let the myth of security for openbsd make you think you are safe, install anything, an then LEARN how to secure it

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know I know, you know reading the art of intrusion desipated any illusions I had about me being secure. I am going to say fuck it and dive in head first by using open bsd. What way to you recommend for installing it? Oh and thanks for all the help.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can not get the flexibility of Gentoo from anywhere else.

Let me put it this way I have a server that is split up into 4 different servers via Xen. All of which only have as much software as they need. Gentoo was the only distro that I could find that let me do this (it lets you go from a very minimal install to as bloated as you want it).

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0