Exvitel

Hardware Hacking Toolkit

38 posts in this topic

Ratchet Crimps, both for normal crimps and for networking

Ratchet with various sockets

Soldering Iron

Suction Pump

Tweezers for putting SMD components onto boards

Various screwdrivers, I have the VDE ones for working with high voltages

I also use something called plastidip to coat my tool handles, it's liquid plastic so I get a good grip and no one can steal my tools and claim it as there own also I'd get some heat shrink or liquid electrical tape

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One tool I find very helpful are hemostats... plus the usual soldering iron and stuff... but I ain't into it as deep as ya'll are.

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One tool I find very helpful are hemostats... plus the usual soldering iron and stuff... but I ain't into it as deep as ya'll are.

Most of the techs in my shop keep a couple pairs in their toolbox. You can sometimes find them real cheap at oddlot/joblot stores in the fishing/sporting goods section, gun shows, and hamfests/electronic fleas.

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Don't buy the Coldheat. I picked it up on sale at Costco a few weeks back, paid $13 and it wasn't worth even that. It doesn't get hot enough nor focused enough to do very well with electronics :(

I got one as a gift and I got one solder done and tried to start the second when half of the tip chipped off and you have to buy a new one for $19... Coldheats are horrible

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This company is good if you’re looking to get into hardware hacking. The USB logic analyzer works great and is a nice little tool to carry around with your laptop. The USB oscilloscope / Data Logger / Meter / Spectrum Analyzer is also very good for the price.

http://cnb-host4.clickandbuild.com/cnb/sho...categories-null

The tools are cheap for what you get, but are a little out of the price range.

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Don't buy the Coldheat. I picked it up on sale at Costco a few weeks back, paid $13 and it wasn't worth even that. It doesn't get hot enough nor focused enough to do very well with electronics :(

I got one as a gift and I got one solder done and tried to start the second when half of the tip chipped off and you have to buy a new one for $19... Coldheats are horrible

Forget the Coldheat Soldering Iron. They suck. For the same price you can go to Home Depot and get a Butane powered Weller Iron that works 100% better.

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Don't buy the Coldheat. I picked it up on sale at Costco a few weeks back, paid $13 and it wasn't worth even that. It doesn't get hot enough nor focused enough to do very well with electronics :(

I got one as a gift and I got one solder done and tried to start the second when half of the tip chipped off and you have to buy a new one for $19... Coldheats are horrible

Forget the Coldheat Soldering Iron. They suck. For the same price you can go to Home Depot and get a Butane powered Weller Iron that works 100% better.

I also heard that those Coldheat soldering irons spark too. Really bad for electronic related stuff.

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Don't buy the Coldheat. I picked it up on sale at Costco a few weeks back, paid $13 and it wasn't worth even that. It doesn't get hot enough nor focused enough to do very well with electronics :(

I got one as a gift and I got one solder done and tried to start the second when half of the tip chipped off and you have to buy a new one for $19... Coldheats are horrible

Forget the Coldheat Soldering Iron. They suck. For the same price you can go to Home Depot and get a Butane powered Weller Iron that works 100% better.

I also heard that those Coldheat soldering irons spark too. Really bad for electronic related stuff.

Mine not only sparks, it spits flames and sings the blues.

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Good Lord, what are you guys trying to do, bypass security in a bank vault or art gallery.

Seriously though, keep you soldering iron tips clean and tinned at all time. They will work much better that way

Small plastic zip lock baggies, to keep misc parts and screws in if you take something apart. nothing worse than losing screw or nuts and washers.

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depends of what would you like to do... i mean... some stuff is must have ... but many ppl dont need 3 iron solders, or dunno how big sets of screwdrivers, you can do most things with very limited tools.. i have a small kit to carry around... tho i have shitload of tools... most of them arent used often.

This small toolkit is extremly usefull and uber cheap:

crap.jpg

It lacks a knice, but with a knife it would be perfect. Sure its good to have shitload of tools.... but when you need to be remote, small set as this is kickin ass

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I got a set of jewelers glasses for when I'm working. Those are the glasses that jewelers will use, the ones with multiple levels of magnification that can be changed on the fly. They come in handy for checking circuit boards.

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