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zraith

Amatuer -> Amatuer Radio

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I have just gotten into the Amatuer radio scene, so far I have purchased two books and am studying vigorously.

I have two questions:

1) The first thing I want to do is buy a hand-held transviever. Does anyone have any recommendations for a hand-held transciever(possibly dual-band) for under 300 US dallars?

2) I know Citizens Band(CB) radio operates on Shortwave(HF), so could one operate on CB channels via a shortwave radio in voice mode?

I am going for a Amatuer General Class(Element 2) with Morse Code.

If there is any other information you think I will need, or just want to give me some advice, you are more than welcome. I look forward to your advice and the HAM experience.

Thank you,

Zraith

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I have just gotten into the Amatuer radio scene, so far I have purchased two books and am studying vigorously.

I have two questions:

1) The first thing I want to do is buy a hand-held transviever. Does anyone have any recommendations for a hand-held transciever(possibly dual-band) for under 300 US dallars?

2) I know Citizens Band(CB) radio operates on Shortwave(HF), so could one operate on CB channels via a shortwave radio in voice mode?

I am going for a Amatuer General Class(Element 2) with Morse Code.

If there is any other information you think I will need, or just want to give me some advice, you are more than welcome. I look forward to your advice and the HAM experience.

Thank you,

Zraith

Great questions! Lets get some answers:

1) Hand held xcievers (HTs) are all usually <300$. Almost all radios are dual band, some even go triple (144 and 440 being standard, 6m, 220mhz, or even 1.2 ghz being the 3rd band option). I do some satelite work, and you want to hear yourself on the other side of the satelite (kind of like a repeater, with 2 frequences, but with the satelite you want to make sure you are actually talking to it ;) ) so you want to get 2 radios or get one radio that is full duplex (talk and hear at the same time, needs headphones of course). Some radios say full-dup, but they lie. Icom w32a is a true full duplex(which i own). I had a Icom t7h, and a kenwood f6a for a week till it was stolen. All great radios. Check out www.hamradio.com or www.gigaparts.com , and dont forget ebay.com or even the message boards at qrz.com . The latter two have great prices.

2) Im sure it is possible. Some all band multimode (fancy way of saying all HF ham bands on voice, CW, data) rigs have tx/rx mods which would open this up. mods.dk is the place to be for that.

Good luck on your tests! The morse code part of the test is quite easy, so dont sweat of that part!

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I have just gotten into the Amatuer radio scene, so far I have purchased two books and am studying vigorously.

I have two questions:

1) The first thing I want to do is buy a hand-held transviever. Does anyone have any recommendations for a hand-held transciever(possibly dual-band) for under 300 US dallars?

2) I know Citizens Band(CB) radio operates on Shortwave(HF), so could one operate on CB channels via a shortwave radio in voice mode?

I am going for a Amatuer General Class(Element 2) with Morse Code.

If there is any other information you think I will need, or just want to give me some advice, you are more than welcome. I look forward to your advice and the HAM experience.

Thank you,

Zraith

Great questions! Lets get some answers:

1) Hand held xcievers (HTs) are all usually <300$. Almost all radios are dual band, some even go triple (144 and 440 being standard, 6m, 220mhz, or even 1.2 ghz being the 3rd band option). I do some satelite work, and you want to hear yourself on the other side of the satelite (kind of like a repeater, with 2 frequences, but with the satelite you want to make sure you are actually talking to it ;) ) so you want to get 2 radios or get one radio that is full duplex (talk and hear at the same time, needs headphones of course). Some radios say full-dup, but they lie. Icom w32a is a true full duplex(which i own). I had a Icom t7h, and a kenwood f6a for a week till it was stolen. All great radios. Check out www.hamradio.com or www.gigaparts.com , and dont forget ebay.com or even the message boards at qrz.com . The latter two have great prices.

2) Im sure it is possible. Some all band multimode (fancy way of saying all HF ham bands on voice, CW, data) rigs have tx/rx mods which would open this up. mods.dk is the place to be for that.

Good luck on your tests! The morse code part of the test is quite easy, so dont sweat of that part!

1.) I totally agree with part one. It's all a matter of preference. I personally use a Yaesu FT-530 (precellban) which has a few unique abilities. Plus it's dual band and can work FM sats.

2.) Converting and using HAM (Part 97) equipment is ILLEGAL within the Citizen Band (Part 15) spectrum. All Part 15 equipment must be "Type Accepted" for use within this spectrum. However, one can convert Part 15 into Part 97 ONLY with a valid Amateur Radio Operators license.

Reasons being: 1.) Ham equipment does not have to meet emissions limitations for Part 15 (for CB it's 4 watts AM and 12 watts SSB). 2.) It has to meet different engineering requirements for spirious emissions (those noises that cause interefence with TV's and such) and 3. Manufactures have to spend more money for Part 15 type acceptance than Part 97 so when you see a Ranger 2910, you're seeing a legal version of a bootleg rig. It's not illegal for you to own as a HAM operator, but given how easy it is to mod (one jumper I believe) it's edges that line.

Remember, when bootlegging on CB frequencies with power, you become an alligator because it's likely your antenna system sucks. Even if you got a properly grounded and working antenna system, don't think they won't try to play hunt the fox. CB'ers do it too... it's not just a HAM sport ya know. ;)

73 de jf.

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Here's a quick quiz relating to:

If your neighbor complains about interference on their TV from your Cubical Quad standing 60 feet in the air, whose responsibility is it resolve said interference?

Answer: Theirs. Since a TV is Part 15 and you're a licensed Part 97 operator, the panel on the back of said TV states that "This is a Part 15 device and must accept any and all licensed radio interference which may affect the operation of this receiver" (or something to that effect).

Now the nice neighbor would try to resolve issues (including contacting the ARRL RFI desk) but you're under no obligation to do so.

Oh btw: I may be wrong on which part CB is.... I'm thinking Part 15 since it's unlicensed, Maybe under a different part however.

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Do you Americans still have the Morse Code license? We used to have the Morse Code license, but now we only have Basic and Advanced. Canada got smart, we dropped it like a stolen dead baby. :P

Since I'm poor, I still use Echolink. >_<

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General and Extra class requires a morse code test, but there's an ongoing debate about

possibly removing the code from General, or even both classes.

Echolink is pretty fun, I just recently got a sound card interface and played around with

setting up a link, but I still haven't fixed all the bugs with recognizing the DTMF commands.

Edited by stderr
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General and Extra class requires a morse code test, but there's an ongoing debate about

possibly removing the code from General, or even both classes.

Echolink is pretty fun, I just recently got a sound card interface and played around with

setting up a link, but I still haven't fixed all the bugs with recognizing the DTMF commands.

Personally I would like to see the code requirement remain. People still don't get that morse is one method of communication that can get through when other modes cannot (not withstanding some digital modes).

Plus it reduces the technical capabilities of stations because it means they won't be able to copy a transmission. And it reduces the number of LIDS on the air.

If the code requirement were totally lifted in the US, I'm not sure if I'd ever operate on the Phone bands again. Too much QRM. At least I still have my 25khzish per band I can operate where I won't have to fight over spectrum.

-jf

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thanks for the help guys.

Though I would like to get a pre-cell transciever, I figure that will most likely be out of the question(unless fate rears its(his or hers?) ugly head)...

As Radio Shack fudged(in placed of a more popular word) my order, I wont be recieving my book for another whole week.

Seeing as the next testing date is December 17, this may or may not be a problem.

I did end up buying A complete idiots guide to Ham Radio, but it about usless unless you already own a license, though i did learn a thing or two.

I really would like to study for the test, and if anyone could refer me free resources, i would me more than grateful.

Again, thanks for the help.

I look forward to Hammin' soon.

Regards,

Zraith

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thanks for the help guys.

Though I would like to get a pre-cell transciever, I figure that will most likely be out of the question(unless fate rears its(his or hers?) ugly head)...

As Radio Shack fudged(in placed of a more popular word) my order, I wont be recieving my book for another whole week.

Seeing as the next testing date is December 17, this may or may not be a problem.

I did end up buying A complete idiots guide to Ham Radio, but it about usless unless you already own a license, though i did learn a thing or two.

I really would like to study for the test, and if anyone could refer me free resources, i would me more than grateful.

Again, thanks for the help.

I look forward to Hammin' soon.

Regards,

Zraith

There are a few models of radio that has are pre-cell and have the capabilities. One is the Yaesu FT-530. Another is a Alinco DJ-580 (both dual banders). Look around the radio modification databases to find how to "unlock" particular radios. Make sure it does state that it's FULL coverage. Tho, I do admit, unless your area is pretty sparse on cell towers, you're not going to hear much due to everyone going digital. But when it wasn't, many interesting conversations. They do come around... just watch eBay.

As for resources. Since you're going to have to learn everything up to General, you'll need the following:

Complete understanding of Part 97 (search google for the entire text of FCC Part 97). You'll also need to know what license is allowed to transmit on what bands so get a copy of the Amateur Band Plan (available from ARRL or ICOM makes a nice color version in PDF). Then, study basic electronics. You'll need to know Ohm's law, what capacitance is, what resistance is and how it equates to Ohm's law. Also you might want to search around for practice test or even the answer pool for the tests you'll be taking. The test is roughly 25-50 questions selected randomly with different scoring based on different criteria (rules and regs, basic electronics, operations, propagation, etc.) but it will at least give you an idea.

The book I used was "Now You're Talking" available just about anywhere. It applies to Novice and Tech classes of license. General class is just a little more indepth on the previous classes with knowing the different bands and emission types (from memory... check the current q/a pool to verify).

You'll also want to learn how to calculate for wavelength. the equasion is 984/f where f is frequency and the 984 is for a full wavelength with the answer in meters. Based on this, you can calculate how long a 2 meter 1/4 wave vertical is (234/f = 234/146mhz=1.60meters=4.8feet).

Stuff like that. I'd say tho, that rules and regs are the largest portion of the test as a beginner (as you go up in class, the test lean more towards electronics and propagation/fields).

Good luck and hope to see you on the air in the future.

-jf

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Personally I would like to see the code requirement remain. People still don't get that morse is one method of communication that can get through when other modes cannot (not withstanding some digital modes).

Plus it reduces the technical capabilities of stations because it means they won't be able to copy a transmission. And it reduces the number of LIDS on the air.

I'm only a Technician licensee right now, but I will hopefully look into upgrading after

college. Even if they did remove the morse code requirement I would more than likely

still use CW on the air.

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Personally I would like to see the code requirement remain. People still don't get that morse is one method of communication that can get through when other modes cannot (not withstanding some digital modes).

Plus it reduces the technical capabilities of stations because it means they won't be able to copy a transmission. And it reduces the number of LIDS on the air.

I'm only a Technician licensee right now, but I will hopefully look into upgrading after

college. Even if they did remove the morse code requirement I would more than likely

still use CW on the air.

I have an Advanced ticket so yeah... I'd probably stick with CW. One of these days I'll get my code speed back up so I can participate in a conversation. :)

Besides, there's less crowding on those portions of the band. And alot of shows still promote morse code because it's a very simple system that works. Removing the code requirement just allows OEM's to move more product.

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Do you guys use Q codes down there in USA Amateur land? I _hate_ Q codes. >:( Old HAMs come on the air, and they _say_ Q codes. So annoying. Either way, I'm only a Basic, I'm stoked to get my Advanced license. :)

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Do you guys use Q codes down there in USA Amateur land? I _hate_ Q codes. >:(  Old HAMs come on the air, and they _say_ Q codes. So annoying. Either way, I'm only a Basic, I'm stoked to get my Advanced license. :)

Totally. We use them UP here. :)

Yeah, it's kind of a throwback to 10 codes but people understand it right off the bat. It doesn't replace normal speech but I do hear QRZ on HF and QRM often enough.

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