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Dr. Z2A

BSD vs. Linux

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ok so I'm thinking about installing BSD. Before I do I want to see what other people think of it. Can any of you people that are opinionated on this tell my why you like one better than the other? Also how does BSD do with hardware detection and dual booting?

I also can't decide what type of BSD to install. Can anyone share the pros and cons of each? I'm thinking of doing OpenBSD because its so secure, but does this security cost the usability of it at all? And does anyone know where I can find a live cd of any of them to try them out? I have a freeBSD live cd so I'm just looking for lives of Net and Open BSD.

I also need to know how to partition. I know that BSD partitions are on one partition that is just "sliced" up, but how would I slice the partition?

Also, although II'm not really considering using it, just curious, how does Plan 9 compare to both linux and BSD?

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ok so I'm thinking about installing BSD.  Before I do I want to see what other people think of it.  Can any of you people that are opinionated on this tell my why you like one better than the other?  Also how does BSD do with hardware detection and dual booting?

I also can't decide what type of BSD to install.  Can anyone share the pros and cons of each?  I'm thinking of doing OpenBSD because its so secure, but does this security cost the usability of it at all?  And does anyone know where I can find a live cd of any of them to try them out?  I have a freeBSD live cd so I'm just looking for lives of Net and Open BSD.

I also need to know how to partition.  I know that BSD partitions are on one partition that is just "sliced" up, but how would I slice the partition?

Also, although II'm not really considering using it, just curious, how does Plan 9 compare to both linux and BSD?

It does well detecting hardware it has drivers for. Its driver focus, though, is more on the server side than on the desktop side. Of course, the driver coverage varies depending on the BSD. For newish hardware, you might need to run -current or a different BSD. For example, I upgraded openbsd from release in order to support my laptops broadcom gig-e nic.

As for openbsd, I find it a decent desktop, I prefer it better as a desktop than FreeBSD, and it works better as a desktop than netbsd in my opinion (which may change in october when netbsd3 is released).

As for partitions, you just fdisk and disklabel, the installer will you walk you through this (with freebsd offering the easiest to use interface, openbsd and netbsd are slightly more complex.

All the BSDs can dual boot, in some form or other. FreeBSD is the only one with a built-in bootloader for it, but netbsd and openbsd are easily dual booted (indeed, my laptop dual boots netbsd 2.02, openbsd, and windows xp pro.

I'd recommend atleast trying openbsd, but then again i'm not much of a fan of freebsd. I'd recommend netbsd, but I have pretty frequent hardware issues with it, and unless you wanna run current, it might not be the best choice (atleast, not 2.02).

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ok so I'm thinking about installing BSD.  Before I do I want to see what other people think of it.  Can any of you people that are opinionated on this tell my why you like one better than the other?  Also how does BSD do with hardware detection and dual booting?

I also can't decide what type of BSD to install.  Can anyone share the pros and cons of each?  I'm thinking of doing OpenBSD because its so secure, but does this security cost the usability of it at all?  And does anyone know where I can find a live cd of any of them to try them out?  I have a freeBSD live cd so I'm just looking for lives of Net and Open BSD.

I also need to know how to partition.  I know that BSD partitions are on one partition that is just "sliced" up, but how would I slice the partition?

Also, although II'm not really considering using it, just curious, how does Plan 9 compare to both linux and BSD?

OpenBSD / FreeBSD / BSDNet / BDSI ($) are all good but really more for the servers.

Start out simple.

What is it you want to run and what is it you want to run.

What architecture best supports that type of application.

What OS supports that application best.

What OS has better support for that application.

How hard is it to secure the platform (architecture / application / OS) from those poeple who would like to turn your machine into a SPAM box?

If you are using the computer for just email, get Winders. You might be happier.

If you are going to do some serious programming or need applications up 24/7/52 then you would want a Linux / FreeBDS / Solaris (Also Free) systems.

By the way, those little script kiddies work best againt Winders, and Solaris then Linux. If you want to make it hard for the kiddies, choose something off the wall like BSDI or BSDNet.

Tom

UNIX since 86!

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I'm using FreeBSD now and I like it. There are annoyances, though. The major annoyance is that ctrl-alt-space sends my machine into a kernel panic.

I'd go with OpenBSD. It just seems like a better system.

Edited by Fubster
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BSDNet? Do you mean NetBSD?

An operating system is only as good as its user. FreeBSD's package is convenient, and it fits my needs. But, then again, I've been a UNIX guy since my initiation into the world of computers. Many people use Windows and Linux, and some use them quite well. Just get something and stick with it; otherwise you'll never get anything done.

There are other BSDs, too. And you can always refer to the official guides/handbooks/whatever when you get stuck (or learn the wonders of man pages).

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My opinion of Plan9 should be well known right now. It's a pointless waste of time for anyone looking to get something out of an OS install. It's a hobby/pet project at best. Here's a little breakdown for you:

Freebsd: Strong, stable, robust and secure. Freebsd has the most third party packages (ports), and is normally on the cutting edge of any new versions (if you update ports). If there is something Linux can do FreeBSD can do it. Its not that FreeBSD is more insecure than Openbsd (well it is in a way), but FreeBSD's focus is not only on security, so the overall focus of the system shifts. Currently I have FreeBSD running on one of my servers doing an amazing job, howver I also have it running on my Centrino notebook. I get about 45 hours to a battery, all features including wireless are supported, and I'm running gnome 2.10.2. I don't see a downside personally to using FreeBSD, and have never had ANY stability issues.

OpenBSD: The sole focus of this flavour of Unix is security. This focus can be seen in every aspect of the system. OpenBSD is very similar to FreeBSD in it's use. In fact when switching one of my boxen to OpenBSD from FreeBSD I noticed very little difference. The MAIN difference is the install. OpenBSD's install is not friendly at all by any stretch of the imagination.If you are comfortable with this then jump right in. The security features that have been added to the system tho are remarkable. ProPolice for process control, systrace to control system calls, sudo to create finegrained rulesets for semi-admins, OpenBSD has awesome security features. The PF firewall is an incredible tool, and the quality of the projects that come out of the OpenBSD team is amazing. If you can put up with a pain in the ass install and a slower update cycle OpenBSD is for you.

NetBSD: Runs on everything. The main reason that I'd choose NetBSD is Xen. I haven't had the chance to try Xen out yet, but it's a virtual machine for Unix, sort of like a Unix only VMWARE machine. Given time and budget I will spend a lot of time with this operating system, and document all experiances.

A note on partitioning: You make one slice for freebsd, this the section of your drive you want to commit to FreeBSD. You think partition that slice as much as you want. In regards to partitioning schemes, just use a normal Unix paritioning scheme, but keep in mind that your ports tree compiles under /usr/, so give it alot of room, or give you root alot of room if /usr is on your root partition.

If you're just starting out stick with FreeBSD for now, learn the ropes, get used to it, then take the plung with openbsd. I started with FreeBSD on my server, then laptop, then built my firewalls with openbsd. Then I shifted a server over. Its a great OS, but all the BSD's are incredible choices for OS, so I can see why it's hard to choose.

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I would love to use FreeBSD, everything I have read says it's the better choice. The problem I have is when I install it and reboot its goes crazy. Also you have to install X after the install (I think). I am still trying to get it working, but if you can I would say to.

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I would love to use FreeBSD, everything I have read says it's the better choice. The problem I have is when I install it and reboot its goes crazy. Also you have to install X after the install (I think). I am still trying to get it working, but if you can I would say to.

If you run freebsd make sure you have pnp os disabled in bios, or you will regret it. This is prob true of any opensource os, but really vital in freebsd recently.

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well i have freebsd installed on my system now. My unfamiliarity with it is very apperent, so i have a few questions.

I installed both kde and gnome but when i type in startx it comes with this weird thing that looks like 3 command line terminals. I think that I need to specify my desktop environment and window manager and all still. Can anyone tell me how I would do this?

My other problem is that I am dual booting and when I boot my comp it goes into freebsd immediately. I selected the wrong option for the boot manager in the setup or something. I was able to use GRUB on the ultimate boot cd to dual boot right now. Of course I don't want to always have to do this, so can anyone tell me how I would install grub or w/e boot manager freebsd uses to the mbr?

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well i have freebsd installed on my system now.  My unfamiliarity with it is very apperent, so i have a few questions.

I installed both kde and gnome but when i type in startx it comes with this weird thing that looks like 3 command line terminals.  I think that I need to specify my desktop environment and window manager and all still.  Can anyone tell me how I would do this?

My other problem is that I am dual booting and when I boot my comp it goes into freebsd immediately.  I selected the wrong option for the boot manager in the setup or something.  I was able to use GRUB on the ultimate boot cd to dual boot right now.  Of course I don't want to always have to do this, so can anyone tell me how I would install grub or w/e boot manager freebsd uses to the mbr?

Question 1: edt your $HOME/.xinitrc file (which prob does not exist). Put something like exec startkde in it, or whatever.

Question 2: I believe boot0cfg -Bv ad0 is what you want

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well i have freebsd installed on my system now.  My unfamiliarity with it is very apperent, so i have a few questions.

I installed both kde and gnome but when i type in startx it comes with this weird thing that looks like 3 command line terminals.  I think that I need to specify my desktop environment and window manager and all still.  Can anyone tell me how I would do this?

My other problem is that I am dual booting and when I boot my comp it goes into freebsd immediately.  I selected the wrong option for the boot manager in the setup or something.  I was able to use GRUB on the ultimate boot cd to dual boot right now.  Of course I don't want to always have to do this, so can anyone tell me how I would install grub or w/e boot manager freebsd uses to the mbr?

Question 1: edt your $HOME/.xinitrc file (which prob does not exist). Put something like exec startkde in it, or whatever.

Question 2: I believe boot0cfg -Bv ad0 is what you want

Ok so I got the second question fixed all good. And I kind of got the first one fixed.

I can get kde when in root but I can't get it as a normal user. When I do startx as a normal user it says:

(EE) Failed to load module "fbdev" (module does not exist, 0)

xinit: Permission denied (errno 13): no program named "/home/drz2a/.xinitrc" in PATH

Specify a program on the command line or make sure that /usr/X11R6/bin is in your path

I gather from this that I don't have the permissions to access .xinitrc. Its placed in /home/drz2a/.xinitrc and also a copy of the same file is in /root. But I'm probably wrong lol

Can anyone help me out with this?

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well i have freebsd installed on my system now.  My unfamiliarity with it is very apperent, so i have a few questions.

I installed both kde and gnome but when i type in startx it comes with this weird thing that looks like 3 command line terminals.  I think that I need to specify my desktop environment and window manager and all still.  Can anyone tell me how I would do this?

My other problem is that I am dual booting and when I boot my comp it goes into freebsd immediately.  I selected the wrong option for the boot manager in the setup or something.  I was able to use GRUB on the ultimate boot cd to dual boot right now.  Of course I don't want to always have to do this, so can anyone tell me how I would install grub or w/e boot manager freebsd uses to the mbr?

Question 1: edt your $HOME/.xinitrc file (which prob does not exist). Put something like exec startkde in it, or whatever.

Question 2: I believe boot0cfg -Bv ad0 is what you want

Ok so I got the second question fixed all good. And I kind of got the first one fixed.

I can get kde when in root but I can't get it as a normal user. When I do startx as a normal user it says:

(EE) Failed to load module "fbdev" (module does not exist, 0)

xinit: Permission denied (errno 13): no program named "/home/drz2a/.xinitrc" in PATH

Specify a program on the command line or make sure that /usr/X11R6/bin is in your path

I gather from this that I don't have the permissions to access .xinitrc. Its placed in /home/drz2a/.xinitrc and also a copy of the same file is in /root. But I'm probably wrong lol

Can anyone help me out with this?

Also, you probably misconfigured. Check your conf and try again.

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Check the ownership on .xinitrc. It sounds like its owned by root even though its in your home dir.

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Check the ownership on .xinitrc. It sounds like its owned by root even though its in your home dir.

How do I check ownership? I think youre right (cause when type ls in normal user it doesnt show up). So if this is the case how do I fix it?

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Check the ownership on .xinitrc. It sounds like its owned by root even though its in your home dir.

How do I check ownership? I think youre right (cause when type ls in normal user it doesnt show up). So if this is the case how do I fix it?

ls -l $HOME/.xinitrc

you'll prob need a chown youruser .xinitrc

ie: chown ztoa .xinitrc if your user was called ztoa

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I'd never tried BSD so i wanna try it out but i have question:

Do the programs made to run on Linux work on BSD as well ?

Edited by BloodCROSS
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I'd never tried BSD so i wanna try it out but i have question:

Do the programs made to run on Linux work on BSD as well ?

Some of them do. Depends on how (in)competent the developer was, though.

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In my humble opinion, *BSD is better than GNU/Linux in more than one way. Except ease of use. I'm trying as hard as fuck to install a *BSD system on my computer.

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Nobody said it would be easy d00d, it's just alot better. FreeBSD's friendly, OpenBSD, not so much. I'm shocked you got through the installer, but stumbled over the hardware, and artheros cards are suppose to be one of the easier cards. You can just you hostname.ath0 to set up your cards, but I guess it was just more of a pain. Try FreeBSD, and check for what module you need.

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FreeBSD is definately easier.

Honestly, if you don't feel like messing with a NIC problem, just use a different one. You can pick one up for super cheap, if you don't have a spare lying around. Once you get good with BSD, you can give your other NIC another go.

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There's something called PC-BSD which is run under FreeBSD, if your a novice.. pretty cool I hear.

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