Zapperlink

Getting Started With Linux

72 posts in this topic

something to note, that is for 2.4 kernels, also some systems, /boot is not mounted, you have to mount it first, before you go backup stuff (you'd probably notice) and before you copy the image over to it.

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Thanks for posting this Zapperlink. And thanks for pinning it. Very newb friendly.

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k, I'm a total linux n00b. My only excuse is that I've never had a linux machine till now. I'm running Damn Small Linux off a live cd on my Toshiba Satellite Pro 465cdx. I'm planning to do an hd install asap.

Here are a few questions: Can anybody give a run down of fdisk? It's quite straight forward to use but I see all these file system options and stuff. Which one do you think I should use? Also how do I make 2 separate partitions into one partition?

Also, can anybody explain how to change permissions?

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Well, I'm having compiling problems... I thought this would be a good place to post it for others to read... Ok, so apparently I have no compiler, so I took the liberty of downloading Intel's c++ compiler. Ok, so I've got it installed and whatnot, here is where I'm having trouble.

Before you can use the icc command and the icc(1) manpage, execute

the following source command to set the appropriate environment

variables (such as PATH):

  prompt>source /opt/intel_cc_80/bin/iccvars.sh

When using the C shell, use iccvars.csh in place of iccvars.sh with

the source command.

I do that, and my icc command doesn't work... For those that don't know, with the Intel compiler I believe icc will be the command to compile something from what I understand. Correct me if I'm wrong because I'd rather not have people read that and get all confused because I'm stupid.

Help por favor.

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what if you add hardware, such as a Ethernet NIC card.... and you want to set up your connection... Can anyone explain how to do this?

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first mke sure the device exist

 ifconfig eth1

this is assuming that its your second nic. if not replace the number with the aproperate interger.

if it says

eth1: error fetching interface information: Device not found

then your kernel is not compiled to support that card

but if it says something like

eth1    Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:10:5A:03:93:57

          inet addr:192.168.2.5  Bcast:192.168.2.127  Mask:255.255.255.128

          UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1

          RX packets:256404 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0

          TX packets:176028 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0

          collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000

          RX bytes:272216332 (259.6 Mb)  TX bytes:16662825 (15.8 Mb)

          Interrupt:11 Base address:0x1000

then your device is installed properly

all you have to do is use ifconfig to set up the connection and/or edit /etc/conf.d/net.eth1 assuming your using gentoo. (I'm not sure what file it is in other distros)

hope I helped and didn't confuse you

Note this took me 2 minutes and is in no way detailed

ph34r my interface skillz :ninja:

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I have written this as a short helpful guide for people who want to use a Linux distro, but aren't sure which one to choose. It is neither all encompassing, or completely unbiased. I have taken pains to show a few distros strengths and weaknesses, not just my recommended newb distro. this way, you can choose, and no one shouts "Rightcoast is a walking Debian billboard".

I think there are probably a dozen distros I can think of that would work well for a new user. I am going to stick with the few I think would best serve noobs though. What distro you want, even with all the advice in the world, comes down to what you need it for, and personal taste. I have ranked these in order from lowest to highest, using my judgement and weighing things like ease of use vs. power vs. long term benefits like general *nix education.

5. Mandriva: Formerly known as Mandrake, this is one of the first distros that stressed ease of use. It is one of the top two or three in ease of use. That's also it's biggest drawback. You can't learn shit when you are clicking a button to administer every aspect of the machine. Believe it or not, when you get used to a couple commands, it is faster than a lot of GUI tools anyway. It's package management tool is urpmi. It uses rpm's, being based on Red-Hat and all.

New users will find it easier to configure urpmi with easy urpmi:

http://easyurpmi.zarb.org/

Mandriva homepage

http://www.mandrivalinux.com/

Mandriva forums

http://mandrivausers.org/

Mandriva community wiki

http://mandriva.vmlinuz.ca/bin/view/Main/WebHome

Main Wiki

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandriva_Linux

4. Debian: It has a graphical installer that is easy to use now, and apt-get, it's package manager. While ease of package management is this distro's primary strength IMO, it also makes an excellent server OS as well. Debian is not entirely suited to the new user, so Ubuntu gets the #1 spot.

The Debian homepage

http://www.debian.org/

Offical Documentation:

http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/installmanual

http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/referenc...ference.en.html

This is a site with extensive Debian guides, install walkthroughs, and how-to's. You can use this page alone and get up and running with any type of machine you want, from plain regular desktop, to networked fileserver or webserver.

http://www.aboutdebian.com/

A more technical, but essential page for some more intermediate/advanced Debian topics:

http://qref.sourceforge.net/

"News for Debian, Stuff that Matters" :)

http://www.debianplanet.org/

Wiki page

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Debian

3. Slackware: A very powerful Linux distro. Many experienced users will even call it the *most* powerful. Combine that with the fact a new user can actually pull off an install, unlike other very powerful distros like Gentoo and Linux From Scratch (which isn't really a distro at all, just some docs, but that's another discussion), and you see the main reasons Slackware gets a number three on my list.

It will require you read documentation, and have previous computer experience. At least be able to read and understand technical documentation and you will be fine.

http://www.slackware.com/

2. Knoppix: Awesome hardware detection. What this means for you is that in almost every case, you put the disk in, and everything runs. Ubuntu has worked better for some Wi-Fi equipment for me in the past, but knoppix is at least it's equal in hardware detection anyway. It's good, it's powerful, and if it weren't for Ubuntu, it's waht you would want. :)

http://www.knoppix.net/

http://www.knoppix.net/forum

The main issue I see new Linux users have with knoppix is some slight confusion about the root password. This thread will clear everything up.

http://www.knoppix.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=11500

1. Ubuntu: It is as powerful as any other distro, it's fast and it's clean. It is also nearly idiot proof (not saying anything bad at all, it's just made to be idiot proof). Easy hardware detection and configuration (#1 on any newbs list), and a top notch support community. This is the ultimate balanced distro.

http://ubuntulinux.org/

http://ubuntuforums.org/

And... for a new user, this guide is a very easy to navigate guide to using your new ubuntu system. All you old pros, if you haven't seen this, read it. Hopefully learn from it, and carry it's greatness over your distro's docs. This is what gives it the one up on any distro for a new user. Chua Wen Kiat is an open source hero...this guide is assisting the transfer to a Linux OS for many, many, many, many^ users. Kudos!

http://ubuntuguide.org/

On a final note, I think that Ubuntu is the only distro that will mail you free CD's via USPS. This makes Ubuntu Linux free-as-in-beer for dial up users as well.

Of course, when at all possible try to test a distro out with a LiveCD version. You can run these directly from the CD drive and not have to install a single thing on your hard drive. This means you can try different Linux versions at no risk to your computer.

Here's a complete comparison of distros you can look at as well.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of...x_distributions

Bring your questions on linux over to the guys and girls at Linux Questions. This should be in every new users bookmarks. You can get help with pretty much anything there. Just find your distro's form, and ask away!

http://www.linuxquestions.org

Edit: Hopefully this one can help some people out, add your thoughts too.

Edited by droops
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these books have been very helpful in learning the guts of linux...I had been using linux for a few years before I read these...but I feel I got better after reading these

howlinuxworks_big.jpg

0131478230_500.gif

Edited by doomtroll
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I used to be a Win XP fan until I was told about the power of the command line. I was trying to get by with only cmd.exe in Windoze and found it to be very limited. I didnt want to jump straight into a fresh Linux install so I looked for alternatives. Here is what I found:

http://colinux.org/

Cooperative Linux is a great way to get used to the command line and help decide which distro you want. It just requires a lot of reading and patience. I found it very helpful and worth the while as I didn't want to get stuck with an OS install I didnt peticularily care for. You just have to understand a little bit about networking and ask questions to get coLinux running.

Once you decide you really DO like Linux figure out your distribution. Personally I found the best beginner distribution to be Debian. It has great support and a large userbase. With the apt command you can get A LOT of the programs you need. It is a fairly straightforward distro.

Here is the coLinux Wiki that has almost all of the help you will need:

http://wiki.colinux.org/mediawiki/index.php/Main_Page

Alk3

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Well, I'm having compiling problems... I thought this would be a good place to post it for others to read... Ok, so apparently I have no compiler, so I took the liberty of downloading Intel's c++ compiler. Ok, so I've got it installed and whatnot, here is where I'm having trouble.

Before you can use the icc command and the icc(1) manpage, execute

the following source command to set the appropriate environment

variables (such as PATH):

prompt>source /opt/intel_cc_80/bin/iccvars.sh

When using the C shell, use iccvars.csh in place of iccvars.sh with

the source command.

I do that, and my icc command doesn't work... For those that don't know, with the Intel compiler I believe icc will be the command to compile something from what I understand. Correct me if I'm wrong because I'd rather not have people read that and get all confused because I'm stupid.

Help por favor.

Oh dear. Using icc as a newbie might not quite be what you want...What's wrong with gcc? There's a package for it on every distro on the planet and you don't have to worry about making the shell aware of any special features/linking libraries etc., which is something that Intel's compiler AFAIK still has trouble with. It's a very special, optimized compiler, but not absolutely compatible with a lot a *nix programs/libs.

Anyway, I assume you typed in "source /opt/intel_cc_80/bin/iccvars.sh". What happened? Do you have "/opt/intel_cc_80/bin" in your PATH? What does iccvars.sh do exactly?

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Hmm, the slackware site gives you the source and what not of slackware, but how would you go about uploading it to a computer? So, the operating system would be slackware?

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Hmm, the slackware site gives you the source and what not of slackware, but how would you go about uploading it to a computer? So, the operating system would be slackware?

You need to look a bit harder. All/most distros will have the scr and the bin disk. the bin is what you want (PPC. x86 x86_64) those are precomiled src code.

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Hmm, the slackware site gives you the source and what not of slackware, but how would you go about uploading it to a computer? So, the operating system would be slackware?

You need to look a bit harder. All/most distros will have the scr and the bin disk. the bin is what you want (PPC. x86 x86_64) those are precomiled src code.

Sorry if this is a bit stupid, but what the fuck?

I have tried a few times, and I can't seem to do this. Any guides for installing slackware? I am not getting anywhere installing it to a cd.

Should I just order it off of cheap bytes?

Edited by Octal
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http://www.slackware.com/getslack/

I would use the torrents

http://www.slackware.com/getslack/torrents.php

have you ever installed linux, slackware is one of the more harder distros to install if you don't know what you're doing.

and you only need to download the first two disks.

If you can type cfdisk, and you have the ability to hit the enter key many times. You can install slackware.

I hear Slackware Handbook Project can be quite useful.

Also: You do not need two cds. You only need one. ( Depending. )

Edit: Oh, they dont know how to install nero and open the iso with it and burn it to a cd. Didn't see that.

Edited by |cfh|
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http://www.slackware.com/getslack/

I would use the torrents

http://www.slackware.com/getslack/torrents.php

have you ever installed linux, slackware is one of the more harder distros to install if you don't know what you're doing.

and you only need to download the first two disks.

Would it hurt to install the other two? It seems like it might give you extra things.

I tried booting up with the cd in the drive, but nothing happened, it started with windows.

Edited by Octal
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http://www.slackware.com/getslack/

I would use the torrents

http://www.slackware.com/getslack/torrents.php

have you ever installed linux, slackware is one of the more harder distros to install if you don't know what you're doing.

and you only need to download the first two disks.

Would it hurt to install the other two? It seems like it might give you extra things.

I tried booting up with the cd in the drive, but nothing happened, it started with windows.

CD2 and CD3? No. It wouldnt hurt. But CD3 I believe is source.

Change the boot order.

ie. floppy, cdrom, hard drive, rather than: hard drive, floppy, cdrom.

When you boot up your computer there should be a key you can hit ( ie. ESC, F10, DEL, etc. )

From there you need to poke around untill you find the section on changing the boot order.

If your boot order is correct though, your cd you burnt is bunk.

Edited by |cfh|
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If you can type cfdisk, and you have the ability to hit the enter key many times. You can install slackware.

I hear Slackware Handbook Project can be quite useful.

Also: You do not need two cds. You only need one. ( Depending. )

Edit: Oh, they dont know how to install nero and open the iso with it and burn it to a cd. Didn't see that.

i figured if he couldn't find where to download the cd images he wouldn't be able to install it.

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Redhat = MS of Linux. SuSE is way better (even has Novel server code built IN!)

Seriously though, if you want to starting using Linux, you may want to start with SuSE as it's got a pretty good GUI installation program, will partion your hard-drive for you, install a boot manager (grub rocks!) and sense what kind of equipment you have so that you can be up and rocking in no time!

Hey guys, I found this immensly helpful in my quest to learn linux. I even printed it all out for reference.

Question: I want to try fedora, (I've been using RedHat 6) but can't download the iso's. Can you reccomend a site where I can buy 'em? I (quickly) looked around on the fedora page, but didnt see anything.

thanx for helping out a linux newb.

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Redhat = MS of Linux. SuSE is way better (even has Novel server code built IN!)

Seriously though, if you want to starting using Linux, you may want to start with SuSE as it's got a pretty good GUI installation program, will partion your hard-drive for you, install a boot manager (grub rocks!) and sense what kind of equipment you have so that you can be up and rocking in no time!

*shudder* It's still a rpm-based distro. You should rather say: "Redhat/SuSE/Ubuntu/Fedora/mandr(iva|ake)/whatever simple distro = MS LINUX" If you are going to call things M$-like because of their simplicity and/or ease of use. I know its your distro of choice so you choose to ignore this. ( Or so it appears to be your distro of choice. ) -- What you said about SuSE can be said about many other distros. But lets not continue the flammage. :wub:

ReEdit: I really hope this was a joke.

Edited by |cfh|
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http://www.slackware.com/getslack/

I would use the torrents

http://www.slackware.com/getslack/torrents.php

have you ever installed linux, slackware is one of the more harder distros to install if you don't know what you're doing.

and you only need to download the first two disks.

Would it hurt to install the other two? It seems like it might give you extra things.

I tried booting up with the cd in the drive, but nothing happened, it started with windows.

CD2 and CD3? No. It wouldnt hurt. But CD3 I believe is source.

Change the boot order.

ie. floppy, cdrom, hard drive, rather than: hard drive, floppy, cdrom.

When you boot up your computer there should be a key you can hit ( ie. ESC, F10, DEL, etc. )

From there you need to poke around untill you find the section on changing the boot order.

If your boot order is correct though, your cd you burnt is bunk.

You mean junk right?

And, since my previous experiances(spelling?) with cd distros, I already checked that.

I'll try it again.

Fucken a, man, I am wasting so many cds on this. What am I doing wrong?

I download the first two torrents to the cd, and then write the files to the cd. I restart the computer, and then the screen goes black for a second, and a flashing underline on the top left hand corner of the screen keeps blinking. Then I wait for a second, and I start up with microsoft windows.

I checked to make sure the boot options where in the right order, and they where.

I honestly don't get this.

Well, I'm just gonna go with idiot proof ubuntu.

Edited by Octal
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I added a reply so people will see this faster, not to increase my post cont, just letting you know.

Alright, I got unbuntu installed and everything, but when I get on, I log in, type "help", and then I see a list, but nothing is of what I am looking for. You know how when you use an operating system, you get a desktop screen, with a background and such? How would you acess that?

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