Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Phreak'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • General
    • General.Rules, Guidelines and Announcements
    • Nubie HQ
    • General Hacking
    • Old Skool Phreaking
    • LinkZ
    • Hacker Media
    • Hacker Meetings
    • Programming/Code
    • HAM Radio/Hardware Hacking
    • Retail Hacking
    • Urban Exploration And Social Engineering
    • *NIX
    • Graphic Designs
  • BinRev members section
    • Assorted Projects
  • Off-Topic
    • General Chat
    • Scratchytcarrier's Joke-A-Thon

Calendars

  • Community Calendar

Blogs

  • StankDawg: Howling@the.moon
  • Brokennode
  • RedAnthrax the BLOG!!!
  • CETX_var_log
  • The Hillbilly Hacker
  • Exit Status One
  • Bit Bucket
  • 1337_snic's Blog
  • Kotrin's Blog
  • LibbsSecurity E|Hacker Network Security Blog
  • R4p1d's Blog
  • Ohm's Blog
  • Letting the smoke out
  • 1337_snic's Blog
  • 1337_snic's Blog
  • jeremy_.html
  • tekio's blog
  • lattera's Blog
  • The Microwave Rider

Categories

  • Audio
    • Internet Radio shows
    • Miscellaneous
  • Zines
    • Phrack
    • BR Magazine
    • PoC||GTFO
  • Video
    • HackTV

Found 9 results

  1. Back in 2007, I designed a blue box for use with my ProjectMF server, a telephone PBX switch that allows phone phreaking in a manner similar to the old days of in-band signalling - MF and SF audio tones. That blue box was based upon the PIC 12F683 8-pin DIP microcontroller. Phil Lapsley ("Exploding the Phone") designed a PCB board for it and many aspiring phreaks have built the circuit over the years. One issue with the original code was that it was written in PicBASIC Pro. PicBASIC had a "tone" command that could produce two simultaneous tones if a 20MHz oscillator was used. However, the tone generation never sounded quite right. David Griffith, a vintage telephony and computer buff, decided to re-write my code in C. He followed the same general design principles as I used in my 2007 box, but added some very impressive features and - most importantly - the tones sound great! The code now runs on a modern 8-bin ATTINY85 microcontroller. Dave has also designed circuit boards for the chip and circuit. However, I found the circuit is straightforward enough to build on protoboard, which allowed me to produce this replica of the blue box featured on the first page of the famous October, 1971 Esquire magazine article which popularized phone phreaking. Dave's code may be found at: https://gitlab.com/DavidGriffith/blue... Manual, schematic and and precompiled .hex files at: https://661.org/proj/bluebox/ df99
  2. These are just a few numbers that I've found, but cannot explain. If you know what these numbers do or what they are intended to do, please let me know. 1 800 354 2600 - This number doesn't sound like a modem to me but it does make a loud screechy noise. 1 800 423 2600 - This number plays a series of rhythmic beeps in a loop forever. 1 800 393 2600 - “We’re sorry. All circuits are busy now. Would you please try your call again later? And finally these numbers all play "End of call." before hanging up: 1 800 218 2600 1 800 399 2600 1 800 410 2600 1 800 418 2600 Thanks a bunch, Scoobydooble
  3. This is a little out of my depth but I work in reporting and this kind of fell in my lap. We have a SQL database where logs of all incoming phone calls are dumped. It's a fairly large call center that handles ~100k calls per year. Pretty basic tables such as date of call, DNIS, ANI, etc. One of our partners had projected a much higher volume of calls and because we haven't seen much activity associated with their campaign they have begun to question whether it's possible that calls are being made that we aren't receiving. Our telcom team looked into that and determined we were only at or around 60% of our total trunk capacity, at which point or partner requested to see the physical phone bill and to have it matched up against our call records. So this was kind of a mess and it took a bit of work in Excel to get the data cleaned up and comparable. Everything "seems" to match up just fine, except there are a couple of issues and I was hoping someone could give me some confirmation or information that would elucidate these abnormalities. These issues are: 1. Changing ANI's. Through an automated comparison the phone bill matches our logs 90.86% of the time, however our logs only match the phone bill 80% of the time. So I went through the remaining entries that don't match and noticed a fairly clear pattern. The phone bill might receive 3 calls in a row to the same DNIS and record an area code of 123, whereas our system records a different area code. Sometimes it's just the last 4 digits of the number that change. 2. Changing time zones. It "seems" that both the phone bill and our logs are on central time. Usually calls are 10-30 seconds off, or as much as a minute or two, but sometimes I'm noticing that the calls are offset by a full hour, however these calls typically form the same pattern described above. We'll receive 3 calls at 12pm noon from the same area code, to the same DNIS, and on the other report they're at 1PM, same DNIS, but again a different ANI. 3. Dates not present. I have had no communication with our provider, but I am under the impression that all records between a specific date range were requested and provided for all DNIS's associated. However, there are missing dates. Our records will show we received 10 calls to a DNIS, but on the phone bill there are only 8... and the 2 that are missing come after the last date provided for that DNIS. None of the missing calls appear within a series that is provided for, but always come before or after the first or last call on the phone bill provided for this campaign. I've been told that this is "normal" and that billing can be broken up in a variety of ways which prevent this 100% accuracy. I'm pretty certain that I remember that ANI's can change for a variety of reasons (VOIP, etc.), but I haven't had any direct experience with telephony in about a decade.
  4. need a phone number that is "untracable" without a warrant, as in no published exploits etc that can connect it back to my dox, needs to be a single number that I can pick up like a real cell phone and answer my question is does google voice work for that...? i registered it on an email not connected to my real one... theres an option on google voice to route calls to a different number, which you can then pick up and talk to people on, ive done that already but im not sure if theres some exploit people can use to find out my real number that gmail it routes to, cuz the routing number is my actual cell phone obviously with a warrant people would be able to get my real number and shit but it won't come to that, its nothing illegal, but i need a way to do this so it'd be impossible to find my real world information without police involvement is google voice good for that? if not what else should i use? thanks
  5. Hey everyone, I really need some help on this one. I just made a beige box a few days ago and I've been trying to hook it up in my TNI, but I have not been able to figure my TNI box out (pictures are attached). All of the searching online that I've done is no help. I can't find any screws that have a red wire attached in my TNI. I found a fat green wire, but that's actually the only wire that's even connected to a screw. Plus, all the TNI box pictures and videos online show two screws directly next to one another. I was thinking that maybe since my house has AT&T Uvese phone, that it is not able to be beige boxed. If this is the case, is there a way around it (a different version of a beige box that I can make)? Hopefully someone has run into this before. I would REALLY appreciate the help. If the TNI can be beige boxed, where do I put the allicator clips? If it can't be beige boxed, is there another option for this type of TNI? Also, what is that clear plastic piece in the middle of the right side of the box? It has two green wires running to it from the left side, two blue wires running to it from the right side and a big flat metal screw in the middle of it? Thanks for any help you can give me.
  6. A while ago i was gonna try my beige box in a TNI. I read a lot of files and saw a shitload of threads so i could do it properly once i was there. The one i read about was: But the one i found was: How do i phreak this one? Oh, there's another white box next to this one, but i didnt open it because there was this man who walked outside and he kinda scared me.. Any help would be great
  7. Name says it all. If you ever get bored, come on in! irc.efnet.org #telezonia
  8. Hello there, I am a headhunter/recruiter that was recently exposed to this world. Name collecting is something we continually need to do in order to have a potential candidate pool to draw from. We do this via social engineering. Calling into companies, pretending to be someone else, and trying to obtain names of people who have relevant skills for positions we are working on. This is very time consuming and inefficient, but necessary. This is done basically via exchange scanning. We also map out departments as we go as well. Sometimes we encounter dial by name directories on PBX's which are useful for obtaining transfers/extensions if you know a name, but I haven't discovered any other way to exploit this. I personally target about 15 asset management companies who have offices in Tokyo, all of which use various PBX systems like Audix and Cisco. Can anyone think of a way streamline the name collecting process? Is there a way to exploit a PBX for this information? Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. We currently have an entire office dedicated to this name collecting process. I would be happy to compensate anyone who can help to make this effort more efficient. In a perfect world, there would be a way to obtain entire company phone lists.
  9. Hello there, I am a headhunter/recruiter that was recently exposed to this world. Name collecting is something we continually need to do in order to have a potential candidate pool to draw from. We do this via social engineering. Calling into companies, pretending to be someone else, and trying to obtain names of people who have relevant skills for positions we are working on. This is very time consuming and inefficient, but necessary. This is done basically via exchange scanning. We also map out departments as we go as well. Sometimes we encounter dial by name directories on PBX's which are useful for obtaining transfers/extensions if you know a name, but I haven't discovered any other way to exploit this. I personally target about 15 asset management companies who have offices in Tokyo, all of which use various PBX systems like Audix and Cisco. Can anyone think of a way streamline the name collecting process? Is there a way to exploit a PBX for this information? Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. We currently have an entire office dedicated to this name collecting process. I would be happy to compensate anyone who can help to make this effort more efficient. In a perfect world, there would be a way to obtain entire company phone lists.