mungewell

Agents of the Revolution
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Posts posted by mungewell


  1. A handy hint for testing whether the insulation will attenuate the WiFi signal is to place it in a microwave (without the conductor!!!) along with a glass of water. If it gets warm, then it antennuates at around 2.4GHz which means it will effect your signal strength to some degree.

    There are some antenna designs in this free book:

    http://wndw.net/

    ---

    Wireless Networking in the Developing World is a free book about designing, implementing, and maintaining low-cost wireless networks.

    ---

    Munge.

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  2. There are a couple of FTP server packages in the Debian repo's, have a look and choose the one you think is the cutest.

    http://packages.debian.org/search?keywords...amp;section=all

    You should also think about:

    1). Do yo want local user(names) used for login, or are you going to authenticate against another user list (ie. a user file, databse or via Radius or the like).

    2). Are you going to chroot the ftp server. This is a good idea to prevent it from being able to access other parts of the file system.

    Spoon Fed article:

    http://www.debuntu.org/how-to-ftp-virtual-...h-proftpd-mysql

    Cheers,

    Munge.

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  3. Normally an X client application will terminate if it loses connection to it's X server, you'll need to find a way of keeping a server active on the target machine where the apps are running and then cloaning that to the remote screen.

    I don't know what your objections to VNC are, this would probably be the easiest solution. You can use SSH to securely tunnel into the box to connect to the VNC server. Other possibilties are NX (http://www.nomachine.com/) or running a virtual framebuffer X session and use X2X.

    Other suggestions here:

    http://blog.lxpages.com/2007/03/25/remote-...linux-reloaded/

    Cheers,

    Mungewell.

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  4. Take your pick:

    http://distrowatch.com/search.php?category...p;status=Active

    DistroWatch podcast had a big segment on a new-kid-on-the-block 'SliTaz':

    http://distrowatch.com/weekly.php?issue=20080331

    I agree with the comment about LiveCD's, these usually attempt to use a whole load of memory to speed up the CD access and overlay the user filesystems. I ran XFCE/Debian on some underpowered laptops for a while, for Xubuntu get the alternate install (ie. not the liveCD).

    Cheers,

    Mungewell.

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  5. The server edition is the way to go if you're running on real hardware. Ubuntu JeOS (Juice) is intended for VMWare installations and has a cut down kernel with only support for the bare minimum drivers that VMWare uses.

    The beauty of '.deb' systems is that the package management system is extremely robust, so you could start with desktop (or alternate) and remove the xlibs packages. (Hint you can see what packages are installed with 'dpkg --list'.)

    Cheers,

    Munge.

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  6. Hi,

    Firstly backup up '/home' and '/etc', if you've got those on CD/DVD you should be able to rebuild your system should anything goes wrong.

    Did you mean 'gparted' or 'qparted', either way they are basically the same. You would be able to use either to shrink the existing partition (assuming you have only 1 containing both the OS and /home), and then create another one in the now-available space. If you have run out of primary partitions or need to swap over partitions, it all gets a little more complicated.

    Once the new partition is created, you can format it and mount it at some other location on the system. 'Tar' is a good way of copying a whole load of files across without altering their permissions, or you could use 'cp -rPd <source> <dest>'.

    Once the copy is done, you will need to alter '/etc/fstab' so that there is an entry for home pointing at the newly created partition. You will need to create an empty directory '/home' on which to mount the new partition, for safety's sake I would rename/move the old home to (say) '/home_old' so that it will be still available once the system is rebooted.

    Hope this helps.

    Mungewell.

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  7. So I actually wish people stop saying no one is informed about how OpenID works since they themselves are ill informed on how it works

    Without wanting to get into a flame war, what exactly did I say that was incorrect? We're all here to discuss technology and learn new stuff, I stated that the login is actually done with the OpenID provider not the site that you are logging into (meaning that they don't get plaintext of your password).

    If there is a flaw where the password (or token containing a hash of it) can be grabbed via another means then I'm sure that we'd all like to here about it. It may be that a vunerability such as this is down to other problems (such as choice of browser or OS) and is not a specific problem with OpenID.

    Please educate me,

    Mungewell.

    PS. 'trust me' is a good phrase for selling snake oil, proof is what we want!!

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  8. I setup a website to get the openid username and password of one site and instant access to any openid site there is. can be pretty bad if you look at it from a point of IS.

    I think that you are mis-understanding the way it works. The site you are logging into does not get the password, only your OpenID. It then connects the user to the OpenID server for that OpenID, which validates the user. If the user enters a correct password, the OpenID server returns a token confirming that the user is correctly identified.

    It is up to the original website which decides which OpenID servers it wants to work with, they do not have to accept any old OpenID server.

    Mungewell.

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  9. In addition to the other positive comments above:

    1) When you authenticate with your open ID provider, this should occur via an htttps session so sniffing will not get your password.

    2) If you have a machine on the internet, you can become your own open ID server, providing you can convince the sites you wish to log into to accept your machine as valid.

    The SecurityNow podcast did an episode on it a while back:

    http://media.grc.com/sn/SN-111.mp3

    http://media.grc.com/sn/SN-095.mp3

    I did ask about this in the context of BinRev a while ago (like 9 months or so), however the comment at that time was that the admins prefered to have members join (rather than let any OpenID user post) and that it was probably too much work to implement anyhow.

    It might be possible to have a member join and have the option to specify an OpenID server rather than a username/password for future logins. If someone has an idea on how to code this up, step up to the plate....

    Mungewell.

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  10. Hi,

    From what I can see the problem you have is broken down into two parts.

    1). A database of the 'observed' positions of Wifi Nodes, probably in lat/long locations with a range indicator.

    2). Some method of placing these onto a background map

    For 2) I would suggest that you have a look at OpenLayers (http://www.openlayers.org) which can be used to produce a slippy map (ie. like google maps). For complete 'Free'ness you can use OpenStreetMap (http://www.openstreetmap.org) as the background map.

    If you are looking to map just a small area (say your local town) then you may be able to just use a data file and have pointers/areas flaged on the map. For more extensive coverage it might be better to pre-render an overlay showing the node location/coverage.

    Some examples of what OpenLayers can do:

    http://openlayers.org/dev/doc/examples.html

    The applications used by OpenStreetMap are all open source, so you could start up your own servers. They claim to be a map of everything, but I'm not sure how they would like to host Wifi node data...

    Have fun,

    Mungewell.

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  11. In terms of firewall config I have recently been playing with Pyroman (http://pyroman.alioth.debian.org/).

    It has a config file arrangement with rules in clearer english/text. It can pre-parse the rule for correctness and backups the current state of IPtables before applying new rules - useful if you get something wrong as you can 'undo'.

    Cheers,

    Mungewell.

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  12. I often use my webcam on MSN. However, when using the webcam, the msn process starts eating up my memory until my computer dies of starvation.

    Does anybody know of a FAST way to use the webcam for a conversation over the internet? preferably with text chatting included.

    Anything not written by microsoft...?? Seriously though it depends on whom you are trying to chat to. Most Video phone services run on propriatory protocols, meaning that you are tied to whatever app they supply. There are some open ones (SIP and H323) which can be used for video chat.

    For a 'Free' (beer and liberity) you could use Ekiga which is a SIP/H323 endpoint, you will need to convince your other party to use the same propocol (and possibly application).

    The Ekiga wiki has an interopability table which might give you ideas for other apps to try:

    http://wiki.ekiga.org/index.php/Which_prog..._with_Ekiga_%3F

    Cheers,

    Mungewell.

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  13. Hi,

    I'm trying to put toget a scheme where a VPN is created between two machines, however the machines are mobile and may exist on the same or different networks, possibly with NAT/firewalled connections.

    I'm looking an application/router which would be able to inspect the situation and suggest the best route to the remote machine. This would be like ICE (as used in VoIP). I can control a 'referrer' machine to act as a central server visable to all, which could also packet forward as a last-resort connection.

    Anyone got suggestions?

    Mungewell

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  14. You may have considered this already... I believe a couple of 'push email' systems fake a 'reverse' direction by using long TCP/IP timeouts.

    You could get the client machine to request 'instructions' but with a really long TCP/IP timeout, the server would only reply when it had an action (or just before the timeout was about to occur). If there was no instruction the client would just ask again. With your FTP-like system it could be as simple as the client doing 'GET COMMANDS'

    Since you control both the client and server, once you have a two way dialogue going you can wrap anything up in the files/packets.

    Cheers,

    Mungewell.

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  15. Saying 'Linux from scratch' probably won't help you much, but it's the right approach.... from what you've said you want the absolute minimum installed (rather running) on your machine.

    Ubuntu Server would be a good start, however now days many applications has a huge amount of dependencies and are all written by geeks with vastly overpower machine so they don't see the issue related to slower machines.

    Ubuntu 'Juice' also looks quite interesting, minimal system intended for VM-Ware:

    http://www.ubuntu.com/products/whatisubunt...veredition/jeos

    Mungewell.

    PS for a fast light weight graphical system try Xubuntu/XFCE.

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  16. OR, if you don't have a spare partition, you could always use the zip command to password protect an archive, which you can sort of treat like a folder.

    Zip 'password protection' (cough cough) is trival to break, so don't use it. A better method would be to encrypt the zip archive with a proper encryption program, you could use GnuPG for this (either public/private or shared key).

    Cheers,

    Mungewell.

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  17. I should have mentioned that you don't need root permissions for Encfs, just have to be a member of the FUSE group. You don't need to pre-allocate space (partition or 'fixed' container file); each of the encrypted files is stored as a separate file, this has the disadvantage of meta data leaks but means you don't tie up 'unused' disk space.

    Another cool hack with EncFS is that it can be run in 'reverse' mode, where it presents an encrypted directory created 'on the fly' from a normal (unencrypted) directory, a neat/quick way to produce encrypted CDs/DVDs of non-encrypted data.

    Munge.

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  18. Also, with 20 GB of space, how much should I give each partition? I know swap should be twice your ram, but I have 2 GB, and am thinking 4 GB is a little much. I don't know how much I need to give root. So, any suggestions?

    Others have linked to suitable partition re-sizers.... you are probably right about the size of swap. Rule of thumb is 2x memory size, however with huge memory that is probably not required.

    A useful tip is that if you find a situation (such as compiling libopal) where you need more swap than you have, you can 'mount' a temporary swap _file_. Create a blank file of the appropriate file with 'dd if=/dev/zero of=swap_file ...', 'mkswap' to prepare the file and then enable/disable with 'swapon'/'swapoff'.

    Cheers,

    Mungewell.

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  19. I've never seen a router with a 'shutdown' option, many have 'reboot' options to make changes take effect or get around memory leaks or other bad coding.

    If the router is in close proximity to the computer you could use one of these fancy power-bars which kill the power when the PC is shut down:

    http://catalog.bitsltd.us/catalog/SMART/po.../lbgs/SCG4.html

    Or you could look into X-10 (or other remote) controls to remotely pull the power from it.

    Cheers,

    Mungewell.

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  20. I don't see any reason why the rest of the board wouldn't work OK without the DB25 fitted, however you'll have a job getting it out in one piece without knocking any other components off the board.

    If you really don't want it I'd suggest just taking some side-cutters to the individual pins and then (optionally) de-soldering the bits that are left.

    And you might want to check the height clearance on the DIMMs and processor heatsink as well ;-)

    Mungewell.

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