BINREV SPYD3R

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  1. The boot process is a very particular system for taking a dead hunk of metal and silicon and turning it into an active computer. It is kind of remarkable, and in the DOS environment you really needed to know how it worked. Links: http://webopedia.com/TERM/B/BIOS.html http://webopedia.com/TERM/R/ROM.html http://webopedia.com/TERM/C/CMOS.html http://webopedia.com/TERM/p/power_on_self_test.html http://webopedia.com/TERM/M/MBR.html http://webopedia.com/TERM/k/kernel.html http://webopedia.com/TERM/s/shell.html http://webopedia.com/TERM/i/internal_command.html http://webopedia.com/TERM/b/batch_file.html https://www.ahuka.com/dos-lessons-for-self-study-purposes/dos-lesson-2-booting/ View the full article
  2. In this episode, our two hosts host Rhys Davies, a developer advocate from Canonical. So all beans will be spilled on one of the most popular Linux distros out there. Like its past, present and future. Never mind how Canonical makes its moolah and where this goes... Plus an interesting infomercial on old big iron (IBM, if you're listening: the mail address is sponsor@linuxinlaws.eu). Links: Canonical: https://canonical.com Ubuntu: https://ubuntu.com Manjaro: https://manjaro.org WSL: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/WSL Snapcraft: https://snapcraft.io Ubuntu community reboot: https://ubuntu.com/blog/reintroducing-the-community-team Chromium as a snap: https://snapcraft.io/blog/chromium-in-ubuntu-deb-to-snap-transition Ubuntu podcast episode on this issue: https://ubuntupodcast.org/2020/06/04/s13e11-inside-out-clothes Canonical's transition from upstart to systemd: https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/ubuntu-devel/2016-July/039465.html LinuxONE and Ubuntu: https://ubuntu.com/blog/tag/linuxone Rhys' presentation at the Linux App Summit: https://conf.linuxappsummit.org/event/3/contributions/65 Critical Role: https://critrole.com Hazy Jane: https://www.brewdog.com/eu_de/hazy-jane-440-eu View the full article
  3. NEW 'Off The Wall' ONLINE Posted 22 Sep, 2021 0:47:08 UTC The new edition of Off The Wall from 09/21/2021 has been archived and is now available online. "Off The Wall" - 09/21/2021 Download the torrent here View the full article
  4. Here I tell the tale of a bad disk rescue. Is the rescue bad or just the disk? Well the disk is most certainly bad but please listen and tell me if the rescue was good or bad or could have been done better. Guest stars in this show include: dd ddrescue losetup mount badblocks smartctl The System rescue distro View the full article
  5. Programs referenced in this episode ranger caca-utils poppler-utils atool highlight trash-cli xlsx2csv docs2txt catdoc (for doc2txt and xls2csv) ods2tsv View the full article
  6. Talking Points What is Rust? " Garbage Collection " - Resource Acquisition Is Initialization (RAII) Strict Typing with Type Inference Reference pointers Immutable by default Unsafe Mode Why use Rust over Python? Speed Compiled Help from compiler Smaller binary size Useful in high throughput/embedded applications Logically consistent Why use Rust over C? Safe by default Easier to read Forces you to write good code Arrays without stupidity++ and built in vectors Option<T> and Result<T> or a match {} made in heaven Show Notes Strict Typing fn main() { // Type declared with var: <T> syntax let penguin_one: &str = "gentoo"; // Type &str is inherited from "gentoo" let penguin_two = "gentoo"; // Will not panic if they are the same assert_eq!(penguin_one, penguin_two); } Reference Pointers Wrong Way: fn print_u8_vector(vec: Vec<u8>) { println!("{:?}", vec); } fn main() { let penguin_ages: Vec<u8> = vec!(2, 4, 6); print_u8_vector(penguin_ages); // This line will throw an error println!("{}", penguin_ages[0]); } Correct Way: fn print_u8_vector(vec: &Vec<u8>) { println!("{:?}", vec); } fn main() { let penguin_ages: Vec<u8> = vec!(2, 4, 6); print_u8_vector(&penguin_ages); // This line will print '2' println!("{}", penguin_ages[0]); } Immutable By Default Wrong Way: fn main() { let my_num = 2; // This line will throw an error my_num = my_num + 1; println!("{}", my_num); } Correct Way: fn main() { let mut my_num = 2; my_num = my_num + 1; // This line will print '3' println!("{}", my_num); } Unsafe Code Hello World Program in C in Rust: extern "C" { fn printf(input: &str); } fn main() { unsafe { printf("Hello, World!"); } } Important Links: Rust Programming Language Homepage Rust Playground Ben Eater: Comparing C to machine language <WARNING: YouTube Hosted> Wikipedia Pages: Rust Programming Language Wikipedia article Resource Acquisition Is Initialization (RAII) Contact Me Email: izzyleibowitz at pm dot me Mastodon: at blackernel at nixnet dot social View the full article
  7. I talk about some old old old pentesting stories from days old! View the full article
  8. NEW 'Off The Hook' ONLINE Posted 16 Sep, 2021 1:27:28 UTC The new edition of Off The Hook from 09/15/2021 has been archived and is now available online. A brief history of the turbulence at WBAI, NYC subway disruption caused by someone accidentally pressing the "power off" button, Texas GOP website hacked in response to anti abortion law, new Texas and Australian social media laws, historical 9/11 coverage broken by deprecation of Adobe Flash. "Off The Hook" - 09/15/2021 Download the torrent here View the full article
  9. Inoffensive in every region of the world. Thank you to everyone who has listened to my previous episodes. This is the final episode in the Infosec Podcasts series. I listen to many, MANY podcasts. The vast majority of these are related to information security. Because there are so many podcasts to list, I have broken them down into 6 different episodes based on topics: Part 1 - News & Current Events - Episode 3324 Part 2 - General Information Security - Episode 3334 Part 3 - Career & Personal Development - Episode 3344 Part 4 - Social Engineering - Episode 3368 Part 5 - Episode 3387 Hacks & Attacks Technical Information & Learning Infosec Community / Social / History Part 6 - Infosec Leadership Preamble Term: CISO Pronounced SEE-so or SAI-so Chief Information Security Officer Sounds like executive leadership position, similar to Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Chief Financial Officer (CFO), etc but this is often not the case Security leadership is changing Old way: Experienced technologists (Usually old white guys) worked way up ranks Usually reported through IT (CIO/CTO) Department of "No" - Block everything bad Slows down business New way: Experienced business professionals with leadership skills and security understanding Can report through: IT (CIO/CTO) Legal (For compliance reasons) Finance (CFO) for governance or compliance reasons Financial impacts of attacks Direct costs Fines CEO - Seat at the table with other C-level execs Direct to board Empowers the business to succeed in a secure way Can still slow down the business, but only when needed Brakes on a race car Infosec Leadership Podcasts CISO Tradecraft - G Mark Hardy (Weekly) Discussion of topics related to becoming a CISO or maturing as a CISO https://www.cisotradecraft.com/ CISO Vendor Relationship Podcast - David Spark & Guests (Weekly) Weekly podcast addressing the challenges experienced by both security professionals and the vendors with whom they interact. https://cisoseries.com/subscribe-podcast/ CISO Talks (Weekly) The talk show series with discussions of current trends in the world of information security with CISOs on the front line. https://www.lepide.com/ciso-talks.html CISO Talk - James Azar (Weekly) Presents the CISO view on cybersecurity, talent development, technology, leadership and much more. https://cisotalk.podbean.com/ The Cyber Ranch Podcast - Allan Alford & Hacker Valley Studios (Weekly) Interviews with security leaders discussing relevant topics https://hackervalley.com/cyberranch/ CISO's Secrets - Currently hosted by Grant Asplund and sponsored by Checkpoint Interviews with security leaders across a wide range of industries Addresses real issues facing security professionals and businesses https://cp.buzzsprout.com/ CISO Stories - Hosted by Todd Fitzgerald and Sam Curry and part of the Security Weekly family of podcasts Based originally on interviews with security leaders who contributed to the book "CISO COMPASS: Navigating Cybersecurity Leadership Challenges with Insights from Pioneers" Episodes are usually only about 20 minutes https://securityweekly.com/category-shows/the-ciso-stories-podcast/ The New CISO - Hosted by Exabeam's Chief Security Strategist, Steve Moore and Sponsored by Exabeam Interviews with industry leading and visionary security leaders How do lead security teams and business Interacting with business leaders https://www.exabeam.com/fr/library-by-type/ciso-podcasts/ That wraps up this series. I welcome any feedback you might have in the comments section for this episode on the HPR site. Thank you very much for listening. View the full article
  10. NEW 'Off The Wall' ONLINE Posted 15 Sep, 2021 1:11:35 UTC The new edition of Off The Wall from 09/14/2021 has been archived and is now available online. "Off The Wall" - 09/14/2021 Download the torrent here View the full article
  11. upg.sh my dump.txt to note.md SYNOPSIS: upg.sh Upgrade your system and store stdout into a markdown file. #!/bin/bash # upg.sh FILENAME=sys-upgrade$(date +%m-%d-%Y).md DIRECTORY="${HOME}/Documents/" # step 1: formatting. echo -e "# **System Upgrade:** $(date)\n" \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "**Command:** \`sudo apt-get update; sudo apt-get upgrade --yes\`\n" \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "**Command Breakdown:**" \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "- \`sudo\`, Admin Privilages." \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "- \`apt-get\`, Package Manager." \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "- \`update;\`, Package Manager's task; update the system software repositories." \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "- \`sudo apt-get upgrade\`, Perform system upgrade with updated repositories." \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "- \`--yes\`, Answers yes to the prompt." \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} # step 2: run commands with formatting. echo -e "\n**Command std-output:**\n" \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "\`\`\`" \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo $(date) \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} sudo apt-get update \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "\n# System update completed.\n" \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} sudo apt-get upgrade --yes \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "\n# System upgrade completed.\n" \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "\`\`\`\n" \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} # step 3: additional details with more formatting. echo -e "**Upgraded Package Details:**\n" \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "\`\`\`" \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} PKGLIST=$(sed -n "/The following packages will be upgraded:/,/^.. upgraded/p" ${FILENAME} \ | sed '1d;$d' | xargs -n 1 | sed '/:i386$/d') \ PKGCACHE=$(echo -e "${PKGLIST}\n" \ | xargs -n1 -I _ apt-cache search _) echo "${PKGCACHE}" > ${DIRECTORY}delete.txt echo "${PKGLIST}" \ | xargs -n 1 -I _ echo "sed -n '/^_ /p'" "${DIRECTORY}delete.txt" \ | bash | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME}; echo -e "\`\`\`" \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} rm -v ${DIRECTORY}delete.txt; PKGLIST= PKGCACHE= # step 4: place EOF (end of file). sed -i '/EOF/d' ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo "EOF" >> ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} #EOF Script breakdown: upg.sh First, we declare bash as our shell with #!/bin/bash. We could also use #!/bin/sh for a more portable script. I like to paste the name of the script we're working on into the script itself # upg.sh. Setup a couple of variables to shorten the syntax. FILENAME=sys-upgrade$(date +%m-%d-%Y).md DIRECTORY="${HOME}/Documents/" # step 1: formatting. Build labels and a short breakdown of the update/upgrade commands used. echo -e "# **System Upgrade:** $(date)\n" \ <-- formatting: label with date. | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} <-- path/to/file echo -e "**Command:** \`sudo apt-get update; sudo apt-get upgrade --yes\`\n" \ <-- formatting: command label. | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} <-- path/to/file echo -e "**Command Breakdown:**" \ <-- formatting: label. | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} <-- path/to/file echo -e "- \`sudo\`, Admin Privilages." \ <-- formatting: label. | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} <-- path/to/file echo -e "- \`apt-get\`, Package Manager." \ <-- formatting: label. | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} <-- path/to/file echo -e "- \`update;\`, Package Manager's task; update the system software repositories." \ <-- formatting: label. | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} <-- path/to/file echo -e "- \`sudo apt-get upgrade\`, Perform system upgrade with updated repositories." \ <-- formatting: label. | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} <-- path/to/file echo -e "- \`--yes\`, Answers yes to the prompt." \ <-- formatting: label. | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} <-- path/to/file # step 2: run commands with formatting., Setup labels and an area for the stdout to be store with markdown formatting. We place the time and date into the stdout area then run the commands. echo -e "\n**Command std-output:**\n" \ <-- formatting: label. | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "\`\`\`" \ <-- formatting: markdown. | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo $(date) \ <-- command: date. | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} sudo apt-get update \ <-- command: update. | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "\n# System update completed.\n" \ <-- formatting: label. | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} sudo apt-get upgrade --yes \ <-- command: upgrade with "--yes" option. | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "\n# System upgrade completed.\n" \ <-- formatting: label. | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "\`\`\`\n" \ <-- formatting: markdown. | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} # step 3: additional details with more formatting., List the packages that were upgraded with details from system cache. echo -e "**Upgraded Package Details:**\n" \ <-- formatting: label. | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "\`\`\`" \ <-- formatting: markdown. | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} PKGLIST=$(sed -n "/The following packages will be upgraded:/,/^.. upgraded/p" ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} \ <--| variable with list of packages within it. | sed '1d;$d' | xargs -n 1 | sed '/:i386$/d') \ <--| sed: filter the first and last lines then remove the :i386 duplicate packages. PKGCACHE=$(echo -e "${PKGLIST}\n" \ <--| variable with massive apt-cache search results. | xargs -n1 -I _ apt-cache search _) <--| xargs runs the PKGLIST (the _ is the value of PKGLIST) into the apt-cache search. echo "${PKGCACHE}" > ${DIRECTORY}delete.txt <--| I had to put the PKGCACHE in a file. I couldn't get sed to filter a variable (yet). echo "${PKGLIST}" \ <--| use that PKGLIST to create a few sed commands to filter the file called "delete.txt". | xargs -n 1 -I _ echo "sed -n '/^_ /p'" "${DIRECTORY}delete.txt" \ ^--| xargs is used to create the sed commands. | bash | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME}; <--| run the sed commands through bash then store them. echo -e "\`\`\`" \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} rm -v ${DIRECTORY}delete.txt; <--| use rm to delete the file called "delete.txt" it has the apt-cache search results in it. PKGLIST= <--| empty the variable. why? why not! PKGCACHE= <--| empty the variable. why? why not! # step 4: place EOF (end of file)., Add EOF (END OF FILE) to the end of the file. If one is already there, - it's removed then replaced in the correct position. sed -i '/EOF/d' ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} <--| search for EOF then remove it. we don't want multiple EOF if we run the script multiple times in the same day. echo "EOF" >> ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} ^--| adds the EOF (End Of File) at the end of the file. I read it was a nice thing to do. #EOF <--| Yep. it's there. SYNOPSIS: note.sh "command" "filename" example: note.sh "ls -lhA" "basic-list" make markdown notes of your commands. #!/bin/bash # note.sh "command" "filename" no extentions. # variables FILENAME=$2$(date +%m-%d-%Y).md DIRECTORY="${HOME}/Documents/" # step 1: create file with formatting. echo -e "# **Command:** \` $1 \`\n" \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "**Command Breakdown:**" \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo "$1" | tr " " '\n' \ | awk '{ print "- `" $0 "`, info." }' \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} # step 2: run command with more formatting. echo -e "\n**Command std-output:**" \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "\`\`\`\n$(date)" \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo $1 | bash \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "\`\`\`" \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -ne "\n${FILENAME} has been updated $(date)." # step 3: insert EOF (End Of File). sed -i '/EOF/d' ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo EOF >> ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} Script breakdown: upg.sh First, we declare bash as our shell with #!/bin/bash. We could also use #!/bin/sh for a more portable script. I like to paste the name of the script we're working on into the script itself # upg.sh. Setup a couple of variables to shorten the syntax. FILENAME=$2$(date +%m-%d-%Y).md <--| the "$2" is the second user input (file name) from the commandline. DIRECTORY="${HOME}/Documents/" # step 1: create file with formatting. Build labels for Command Name with a short breakdown of the command(s) used. Note: the breakdown must be entered manually. echo -e "# **Command:** \` $1 \`\n" \ <--| the "$1" is the first user input (the command) from the commandline. | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "**Command Breakdown:**" \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo "$1" | tr " " '\n' \ <--| This just breaks the command into parts then adds some markdown formatting for use to add - | awk '{ print "- `" $0 "`, info." }' \ ^--| details to later. I just added the word info so you know to provide info about the command. - | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} ^--| the formatting gets a bit crazy if you use something like: awk {' print $1 $2 $3 '} path/to/file; each space becomes a newline with the markdown formatting. # step 2: run command with more formatting. Echo the Command into bash with markdown formatting for stdout. echo -e "\n**Command std-output:**" \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "\`\`\`\n$(date)" \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo $1 | bash \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -e "\`\`\`" \ | tee -a ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo -ne "\n${FILENAME} has been updated $(date)." # step 3: insert EOF (End Of File). Add EOF (END OF FILE) to the end of the file. If one is already there, - it's removed then replaced in the correct position. sed -i '/EOF/d' ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} echo EOF >> ${DIRECTORY}${FILENAME} Correspondent: Some Guy On The Internet. Host ID: 391 E-mail: Lyunpaw.nospam@nospam.gmail.com use "hpr391" as the subject line for all emails to avoid the junk filter. show notes markdown file This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. View the full article
  12. Small update about my new RedMi 10s and my new Monty Mint phone. https://www.gsmarena.com/xiaomi_redmi_note_10s-10769.php https://ogadget.com/x/mony View the full article
  13. Important Links GNU World Order Episode 379 Ben Eater's Website Wikipedia Pages Transistor Wikipedia article Logic Gates Wikipedia article Assembly Language Wikipedia article KidDesk Wikipedia article K9 Web Protection Wikipedia article View the full article
  14. Layer Modes, sometimes called Blending Modes, allow you to combine layers in a variety of ways. We'll begin with the Normal modes and work our way through many, but not all, of the Layer Modes available on the latest (at the time I write this) version of GIMP, 2.10.20. Links: https://fontlibrary.org/ https://www.ahuka.com/gimp/free-public-domain-and-cc-assets/ https://fontlibrary.org/en/font/fivefoldornamentsetc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17Iivi0tmug https://www.gimp-forum.net/Forum-GIMP https://www.ahuka.com/gimp/normal-layer-modes-erase-merge-and-split/ View the full article
  15. NEW 'Off The Hook' ONLINE Posted 09 Sep, 2021 1:43:30 UTC The new edition of Off The Hook from 09/08/2021 has been archived and is now available online. Hurricane Ida floods NYC, mandatory 10-digit dialing and new 3-digit codes, Butte Public Library training ethical hackers, repair shop owner at center of Hunter Biden saga loses lawsuit against Twitter, AI's can't file for patents. "Off The Hook" - 09/08/2021 Download the torrent here View the full article