ThoughtPhreaker

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About ThoughtPhreaker

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  • Birthday 11/02/1991

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  1. Whenever it's ready, I can provide a phone line and modem for this; just say the word. This might actually be a good test case for the Tracfone forwards.
  2. That would make sense, yeah. For whatever it's worth, the Qwest 5ESS you're calling passes the not in service message back over an out of band channel. Some routes might just be responding to that their own way. I tried checking a few cheap carriers, but didn't have any luck. For whatever it's worth, I think Google Voice uses bandwidth.com or Level 3 for outbound stuff.
  3. So some years ago, someone pointed out to me that Tracfone billing is done on the actual phone itself; not the network. So with that in mind, I gave something a try, had some decent luck with it, and figured I'd pass it on. At least on phones using AT&T's UMTS network (though I assume this applies to the CDMA phones too), general call forwarding is blocked as it should be, but call forward unavailable/busy/no answer has to be active for voicemail to properly work. So sure enough, using standard GSM call forward codes, you can send those calls elsewhere, and it won't deduct any minutes on the account. At this point, you can ditch the phone in a suitably shady manner, like sliding it under a vending machine at the airport. One caveat with this is that the AT&T mobile network's toll trunks _suck_ (you may have better luck with some of the other carriers. I'd try Verizon if it's convenient/CDMA turns out to work). Compared to just straight 1+, these trunks are ridden with discomfort noise and latency. If you're willing to deal with this, at the very least, it will not be transcoded like normal cell calls are. I don't know for sure, but both of these may very well be avoidable anyway if you choose to forward to a number local to, or otherwise within range of direct trunks to the mobile switching center you're assigned a number on. Keep that in mind when you give Tracfone your zip code.
  4. Their toll network is purely DMS-250s and 300s, yeah. Their hardon for Nortel is pretty pronounced, though; a lot of the ex-Sprint Local territories are almost entirely Nortel switches. Their mobile network is a bit of a different story, though.
  5. I'll look into bringing up the Audix instance again this week and testing this. I don't seem to remember this being a serious problem though, for whatever it's worth. I could give you a valid R11 translations file, but the problem with that is it has a license file on it that's been paired with the processor's serial number. I can still get it if you want it, but I don't think it'll do you much good until more effort is done to reverse engineer it.
  6. I've been using a toll-free scan to test a few different methods of doing faster, but still manually reviewed stuff. Here's the results so far: EDIT: Heh, forgot the prefix. It's 800-488. 0000 - Sex line 0001 - Ringout 0002 - Ringout 0003 - Ringout 0004 - Ringout 0005 - NWN recording, Insight - responds to DTMF 0006 - Annoying queue rec 0007 - Ringout 0008 - Ad 0009 - Call center w/Cisco doohickey 0010 - Easyreach NWN rec, 713-01SG 0011 - Business w/wrbly sounding hosted Broadsoft 0012 - Ad 0013 - Business w/Nortel PBX 0014 - Ad 0015 - IVR, Sketchy debt relief service 0016 - Reorder via SS7 0017 - Ringout 0018 - Reorder via distant end 0019 - Business w/Definity PBX, Audix 0020 - NIS via SS7 0021 - Sketchy order line? 0022 - Reorder via distant end 0023 - Ad 0024 - Ad 0025 - Sex line 0026 - Order line, goes straight to rep 0027 - Business, Enterprise Rent-a-Car, individual location 0028 - Fax 0029 - Business, "Financial Services Organization", Nortel PBX? 0030 - Reorder via SS7 0031 - Business w/Nortel PBX (Lenovo?), same PBX as 0029 (AT&T TF) 0032 - Order line, goes straight to rep 0033 - Ad 0034 - Ringout to VMB, Nortel PBX 0035 - Ad 0036 - NIS via SS7 0037 - IVR, Bi-Lo/Winn Dixie Reporting System? Prompts for project # for event 0038 - Ad 0039 - 5ESS line, fax (Cincinatti Bell Anydistance TF) 0040 - Immediately disconnects 0041 - Business w/PBX, number changed rec. Responds to DTMF. 0042 - Ad 0043 - Ad 0044 - Ad 0045 - Business w/wrbly sounding PBX 0046 - # cannot be reached from calling area rec 0047 - Tech support call center 0048 - Ad? Forward to 800-FREE-411 0049 - Ad 0050 - Wrbly IVR, Kraft-Heinz consumer center 0051 - Ad 0052 - Ad 0053 - Call center, goes straight to rep - customer service 0054 - Order line w/IVR, won't pull docs 0055 - Global Crossing invalid rec 0056 - Ad 0057 - Ad 0058 - Busy signal 0059 - Easyreach 800 0060 - Ringout 0061 - Business w/wrbly sounding Cisco PBX 0062 - Call center, customer service 0063 - Ad 0064 - Ad 0065 - Ad 0066 - Business w/wrbly Panasonic PBX 0067 - Reorder via SS7 0068 - Business 0069 - Ringout 0070 - Ad ?0071 - Qwest UM VMS? 0072 - Ad 0073 - Business 0074 - Business w/unknown PBX 0075 - Wrbly sounding IVR 0076 - Business 0077 - Ad 0078 - Ad 0079 - Business 0080 - Ad 0081 - Ad 0082 - Business 0083 - Busy 0084 - Ad 0085 - Business w/Cisco VMS 0086 - Fax 0087 - Ad 0088 - IVR, National telemarketting company 0089 - Business 0090 - Shitty sounding customer service IVR 0091 - Weird, recorded busy signal via distant end 0092 - Ad 0093 - Ad? Forward to 800-FREE-411 0094 - Ad 0095 - Sex line 0096 - NIS via SS7 0097 - MCI CBCAD 0098 - Weird NWN rec 0099 - NIS via SS7 0100 - Ad 0101 - Ad 0102 - IVR, order line, won't pull docs, spits out 1021 when rep comes on the phone 0103 - Singles line 0104 - NIS via SS7 0105 - IVR, <TTS engine> "Phone number restricted" 0106 - Singles line 0107 - Ad 0108 - IVR, PCCW calling card, terminates in foreign country 0109 - Promoworks IVR rec, "This number is not yet active. It has been reserved for project <individual digit readback> 8-3-8-8" 0110 - Business 0111 - Business VMB? 0112 - Singles line 0113 - Ad 0114 - Ad 0115 - Business w/unknown PBX 0116 - Ad 0117 - Mobile satellite NIS rec 0118 - Weird NIS rec, "Error 201" 0119 - Weird service unavailable rec 0120 - Ad 0121 - Global Crossing invalid rec 0122 - Ringout to other ringout 0123 - 4ESS toll-free DISCO rec 0124 - 4ESS toll-free DISCO rec 0125 - Ad 0126 - T-Mobile sub, 415-802-8282 0127 - Same as 0037 0128 - AT&T disconnected number directory assistance thing 0129 - Ring x2 to busy signal via distant end 0130 - Ringout 0131 - Global Crossing invalid rec 0132 - Ad 0133 - Ad 0134 - Caresource IVR 0135 - Worldcom NIS rec 0136 - AT&T toll 5E/DMS CBCAD rec 0137 - Ad 0138 - IVR, Order line, doesn't pull docs 0139 - Ad? Forwards to 800-FREE-411 0140 - Order line, goes straight to rep 0141 - Ad 0142 - Order line, goes straight to rep 0143 - Ad 0144 - IVR, order line, doesn't pull docs 0145 - Ad 0146 - "Thank you for calling. Goodbye." 0147 - Ad? Forwards to 800-FREE-411 0148 - IVR, order line, doesn't pull docs 0149 - Ad 0150 - Ad 0151 - Business 0152 - IVR? Too much packet loss to tell 0153 - "This number has been reserved for Promoworks, but it has not currently been assigned to a project." 0154 - Business w/Broadworks hosted PBX 0155 - Really sketchy survey 0156 - Ringout 0157 - Ad 0158 - IVR, Harris Teeter reporting system, prompts for project number for event 0159 - Business w/Asterisk 0160 - Ad 0161 - "Please transmit your AMCON order now" <2100 hertz tone, 1 in DTMF> (Qwest TF) 0162 - Ad 0163 - Ad 0164 - Ad 0165 - Sprint DMS-250 CBCAE 0166 - Ad? Forwards to 800-FREE-411 0167 - Mutual of Omaha NWN rec 0168 - NIS via SS7 0169 - Ad 0170 - Order line, IVR 0171 - Wrbly sounding Cisco PBX 0172 - CBCAD via SS7 0173 - Global Crossing invalid rec 0174 - IVR, voicemail check-in line, prompts for account # (Paetec TF) 0175 - NIS via SS7 0176 - Ad 0177 - Business w/wrbly sounding PBX 0178 - IVR, real estate property line 0179 - Southwestern Bell NIS rec 0180 - Ad 0181 - Morgan Stanley IVR 0182 - Qwest UM VMS? "The room number is still not valid. You are going to be disconnected." 0183 - Ad 0184 - Ad 0185 - Business w/PBX, unknown type. Mitel? (MCI TF) 0186 - Ad 0187 - Sprint DMS-250 CBCAE 0188 - Ringout 0189 - Ad 0190 - Ad 0191 - Business w/Cisco PBX 0192 - CBCAD via SS7 0193 - Ad 0194 - # cannot be reached from calling area rec 0195 - Reorder via distant end 0196 - Ring x1 to busy signal 0197 - Ad 0198 - Wrbly Anypath VMB for mobile phone, 917-515-5643 0199 - Ad 0200 - Business w/IVR 0201 - NIS via SS7 0202 - Ad 0203 - Wrbly sounding ringout to Panasonic AM 0204 - Business w/Comcast line, VMB 0205 - Ad 0206 - Forward to wireless Anypath VMB for order line? 0207 - Ad 0208 - Reorder 0209 - Wrbly sounding queue 0210 - Sprint DMS-250 CBCAE 0211 - Ad? Forward to 800-FREE-411 0212 - Reorder via distant end 0213 - Ad 0214 - Ad 0215 - Ringout to wrbly sounding queue 0216 - Call queue 0217 - IVR, order line, won't pull docs 0218 - Ad 0219 - NIS via SS7 0220 - Ad 0221 - IVR, order line, won't pull docs 0222 - Ad 0223 - Weird rec, "You have reached a number that is no longer active." 0224 - ACB via SS7 0225 - Business w/Cisco PBX, 10 digit extensions? 0226 - Ad 0227 - "This number has been reserved for Promoworks, but it has not currently been assigned to a project." 0228 - Ad 0229 - Call center/sales for sketchy old person thing 0230 - Business w/wrbly sounding PBX 0231 - Ringout 0232 - CBCAD via SS7 0233 - Ad 0234 - Ad 0235 - ACB via SS7 0236 - Ad 0237 - Ringout 0238 - Ad 0239 - Ad 0240 - Ad 0241 - Ringout 0242 - IVR, "Welcome to the Safeway Canada reporting system. Please remember to press the # key after each response. Enter the project number of the program you executed." 0243 - Ad 0244 - Ad 0245 - Ringout 0246 - Ad? Sketchy order line? 0247 - Busy signal 0248 - 4ESS toll-free DISCO rec 0249 - NIS via SS7 0250 - Ad 0251 - Global Crossing invalid rec 0252 - Call center w/analog lines 0253 - rec, "The offer for which you are calling is not yet available." 0254 - Qwest UM VMS?, "The room number is still not valid. You are going to be disconnected." 0255 - Sales/support IVR 0256 - Ad 0257 - Ad 0258 - Business w/PBX on DMS-100 line (Frontier TF) 0259 - Call center queue w/loud recorded ring 0260 - NIS via SS7 0261 - Psychic line? Gives free five minute reading (BH Telecom TF) 0262 - Ad 0263 - Ad 0264 - Ad? Forwards to 800-FREE-411 0265 - Ad 0266 - Ad 0267 - Call center IVR 0268 - Ad 0269 - Asterisk MOH for a second, routes to ad? 0270 - Busy signal 0271 - Ad 0272 - Ring + NIS via SS7 0273 - Asterisk NIS rec + weird readback + ringout 0274 - Reorder via distant end 0275 - Ad 0276 - Pat Fleet NIS, trailer '5E1' (GCI Communications TF) 0277 - Ad 0278 - Guy on cell 0279 - Woman on cell? "Call I help you?" 0280 - Ad 0281 - Ad 0282 - Ad 0283 - Ad 0284 - IVR, "Welcome to the Wakefern (sp?) reporting system. Please remember to press the pound key after each response. Enter the project number of the program you executed." 0285 - AT&T Easyreach 800 NIS rec, trailer 713-01SG 0286 - Ad 0287 - Ad 0288 - Business, ringout to AP or APMax VMB (ANPI TF) 0289 - Business w/NEC PBX 0290 - IVR, wrbly sounding pharmacy call center 0291 - ACB via SS7 0292 - Ringout 0293 - Business w/Cisco Callmanager 0294 - Ad 0295 - Ad 0296 - NIS via SS7 0297 - Weird reorder via distant end 0298 - Business w/IVR 0299 - CBCAD via SS7 0300 - Ad 0301 - DMS-100 ringout to Qwest UM VMB 0302 - Ad 0303 - NIS via SS7 0304 - Wrbly sounding call center 0305 - Call center 0306 - IVR, # reserved for client 0307 - Call center 0308 - Business w/DMS-100 line, Nortel key system 0309 - CBCAD via SS7 0310 - Ad? Forward to 800-FREE-411 0311 - Ad 0312 - Ad 0313 - CBCAD via SS7 0314 - Ad 0315 - Reorder via SS7 0316 - Ad 0317 - Ad? 0318 - Ad? Forward to 800-FREE-411 0319 - NIS via SS7 0320 - Business w/Cisco Callmanager 0321 - Ad 0322 - Ad 0323 - Business w/Avaya Partner PBX (Marchex TF) 0324 - Weird # not available from calling area rec (Intelemedia TF) 0325 - Ad 0326 - AT&T Easyreach 800 NIS rec, trailer 713-01SG 0327 - NIS via SS7 0328 - MCI tandem CBCAD 0329 - Reorder via distant end 0330 - Ad 0331 - Ad 0332 - Ad 0333 - Busy 0334 - Ad 0335 - Ad 0336 - Ad? Forward to 800-FREE-411 0337 - Ringout 0338 - Business w/wrbly PBX 0339 - Business w/IVR 0340 - Ad 0341 - Ad 0342 - Ad 0343 - Ad 0344 - Subscriber 0345 - Ad 0346 - Ad 0347 - Reorder via SS7 0348 - # cannot be reached from calling area rec 0349 - Global Crossing invalid rec 0350 - Ad 0351 - Reorder 0352 - Ring x2 + hangup 0353 - Callsource NIS 0354 - rec, "The offer for which you are calling is not yet available." 0355 - Ad 0356 - rec, "The offer for which you are calling is not yet available." 0357 - CBCAD via SS7 0358 - IVR, Qwest Update Center voice, "Welcome to the MeetingOne conferencing service. If you are the host, please enter your PIN and the pound key. Otherwise, please wait for the host's arrival." (MOH plays) 0359 - Call center IVR 0360 - Ringout 0361 - Business 0362 - Qwest UM VMS?, "The room number is still not valid. You are going to be disconnected." 0363 - Business w/PBX 0364 - Ad 0365 - Business w/PBX 0366 - Ad 0367 - Reorder via SS7 0368 - Ad 0369 - Cellular subscriber 0370 - Call center 0371 - Order line, IVR 0372 - Wrbly sounding debt collector 0373 - Ad? Forwards to 800-FREE-411 0374 - rec, "The offer for which you are calling is not yet available." 0375 - Ad 0376 - Ad 0377 - IVR, call center 0378 - Asterisk MOH to ad 0379 - Ad 0380 - Reorder via distant end 0381 - Qwest UM VMS?, "The room number is still not valid. You are going to be disconnected." 0382 - Ad? Forwards to 800-FREE-411 0383 - # cannot be reached from calling area rec 0384 - AT&T Easyreach 800 0385 - Ad 0386 - Weird sounding NIS rec, trailer MIA-8 0387 - Ad 0388 - Ad 0389 - Ad 0390 - NIS via SS7 0391 - Scammy vacation survey 0392 - Ad 0393 - Ad 0394 - Worldcom DMS-250 NIS rec 0395 - Weird sounding NIS rec 0396 - Order line, IVR 0397 - NIS via SS7 0398 - NIS via SS7 0399 - Ad 0400 - Ad 0401 - Qwest UM VMS?, "The room number is still not valid. You are going to be disconnected." 0402 - rec, "The offer for which you are calling is not yet available" 0403 - Reorder 0404 - Ad 0405 - Ad 0406 - Ad 0407 - Busy 0408 - TTS rec, "Phone service on this number has been suspended. You call is now being disconnected." 0409 - Ringout 0410 - Business w/Avaya Definity, Audix 0411 - Morgan Stanley office IVR 0412 - rec, "The offer for which you are calling is not yet available" 0413 - Ad 0414 - Wrbly sounding call center 0415 - Call center 0416 - Order line, IVR 0417 - Ad 0418 - Disconnects immediately 0419 - Ad 0420 - Ad 0421 - Weird FSK modem thingie for alarm systems 0422 - Ad 0423 - Ad 0424 - MCI tandem CBCAD 0425 - Reorder via SS7 0426 - Ring to wrbly sounding MOH 0427 - Ad? Forwards to 800-FREE-411 0428 - Business w/Cisco Callmanager 0429 - Order line, WOW Computer (lol) 0430 - Ad 0431 - Ad 0432 - Call center 0433 - # cannot be reached from calling area rec 0434 - Ad 0435 - AT&T toll 5E/DMS CBCAD 0436 - Business w/wrbly sounding Cisco Callmanager 0437 - Global Crossing invalid rec 0438 - Ad 0439 - Ad 0440 - Busy signal 0441 - NIS via SS7 0442 - Business w/Audix VMB, Definity PBX? 0443 - Ad ?0444 - Business w/PBX 0445 - Call center 0446 - Reorder via distant end 0447 - Ringout 0448 - Ringout 0449 - # cannot be reached from calling area rec 0450 - Ad 0451 - Business w/unknown PBX 0452 - Ad 0453 - Ring x1, disconnects 0454 - # cannot be reached from calling area rec 0455 - Order line, IVR 0456 - Business 0457 - Ringout 0458 - Ringout 0459 - NIS via SS7 0460 - Ad 0461 - Ad 0462 - Ad 0463 - DMS-100 ringout 0464 - Ad 0465 - AP NIS rec 0466 - Reorder via SS7 0467 - Ad 0468 - Ringout 0469 - Ad 0470 - Weird sounding NIS rec 0471 - Ad 0472 - Ad 0473 - Business w/Cisco Callmanager 0474 - Ad 0475 - AT&T Easyreach 800 0476 - Fax 0477 - Ad 0478 - Glenayre/Skytel VMS, prompts for PIN 0479 - AT&T Easyreach NIS rec, trailer 203-01SG 0480 - Morgan Stanley after-hours IVR 0481 - Business w/Ringcentral account 0482 - AT&T Easyreach NIS rec, trailer 713-01SG 0483 - Ad 0484 - Ad 0485 - Busy signal 0486 - Ad 0487 - Ad 0488 - Business w/NEC PBX 0489 - Ad 0490 - AT&T Easyreach 800 0491 - Ad 0492 - Ringout 0493 - Ad 0494 - Ad 0495 - Business w/Cisco Callmanager 0496 - McLeodUSA CBCAD 0497 - Business, ringout to Meatwitch VMB 0498 - Business w/PBX 0499 - Ad? Forwards to 800-FREE-411
  7. Thanks for dropping by and talking about this . I don't know why the DMS-100 will only read back a translated destination like this in only this one context; things like 611 (which translates to a toll-free if I understand right) are still just 611 no matter what you put in front of or behind it. Ramsaso was able to get it to work for local calls from his 5ESS, but -0 went to a local operator instead of resetting back to dialtone. For whatever it's worth, my switch will allow you to dial toll numbers from 9017, but only if they're something that doesn't hit a toll tandem. 0+ to these numbers is also available. A friend (without selective call forwarding, sadly) who works at a place with some Windstream/ex-Florida Digital Network DMS-500 POTS lines says the CAC will work a little more normally from there; -0 will get you the 0 op, so it doesn't appear to be just an AT&T thing. My theory is this is a workaround CAC, like 101-0110; this is used by some switches - most frequently EWSDs as a feature group D workaround to send local calls out. Some places, for example ex-Bell System DMS-100s, never seem to have this, though. Presumably because they have this CAC. ex-SBC 5ESSes specifically seem to have both. One other thing; my DMS-100, when you try entering 101-9017-0 as a destination at the selective call forwarding prompt, will freak out, exit that routine, and reset back to dialtone. I thought it was pretty funny when we found this on the bridge. Enough so that I got all excited and accidentally reached one of my speed dial numbers via talkoff. Whoops . EDIT: I almost forgot; as a reminder, the lab 5ESS from that other thread a while back has selective call forwarding. Not the DMS-100 I'm very disappointed to say, though. http://www.binrev.com/forums/index.php?/topic/48551-us-west-lab-switches/
  8. I made a few quick recordings of this switch over the Definity ADC/Dialogic card. Sharing the numbers themselves will be up to the person that found this switch, so uploading this is the least I can do. ukrainecalls.zip I think research into this exchange showed it was retrofitted in the late 90's with some digital gear - maybe new register senders (or whatever they call them here) and the like, for whatever that's worth.
  9. I was having trouble getting the service pack to run too. Apparently, you do this through the web UI: https://support.avaya.com/downloads/download-details.action?contentId=C2009071016344231500909&productId=P0058 Here's the RPM they talk about being required if you need it. The zipped version might be on the install CD: http://www95.zippyshare.com/v/5PhIkHTA/file.html Assuming there's no dependency issues with the latter, you can just upload it to the machine and type "rpm -i Z7043rf+b.rpm" and it'll install. Lemme know if there are; I don't think there should be.
  10. Did you upload these using dd on a Linux machine or something? I'm not familiar with the compression (or obfuscation, perhaps) format the Definity uses for ATA flash cards. If you want to get a readable output, do the following: * Boot the system with no card * Log in as inads/indspw . It should be valid without ASG in this state. * Insert the card * Type "upload translation" * Receive the translation file via xmodem The license file the system uses is only encrypted using DES-CBC, and resides as far as I can tell at the moment, in the pam process. Granted this a backburner project right now, but myself and other forum members have release 11 systems with valid licenses. I've got some sstepping to do one of these days. And of course, we have a copy of the orange card itself for that release. Forever generally isn't as long as anyone thinks. You should be able to get that D/4PCI card working with a bit of effort. The system comes preconfigured for the D/41JCT cards, but if you run the configuration scripts, there's no reason - at least on the stock Dialogic system releases, why it shouldn't just work. If it doesn't, if it's any consolation, I'm going to probably publicly release a thing or two I've written for Dialogic hardware. I have a port for Windows already made; an environment that's considerably easier to make this hardware behave in with any machine. It's already been tested; I'd just like to clean up the user interface a bit and port a few features that I only made work on Linux before giving it out. As a note to anyone who may be thinking about running Audix with these smaller cards, I recently learned there's two different kinds of D/4PCI cards; the UF and the U4S. If this'll work with anything, it'll work with the UF model - the U4S model, rather than supporting fax (which the Audix system will want to use), supports a feature Dialogic calls continuous speech processing. The D/41JCT card supports both as a consequence of it's massive size. As far as I know though, continuous speech processing isn't used in Audix. Anyway, if you look in /usr/dialogic/bin/ ( 'cd /usr/dialogic/bin' and then 'ls'), you'll see a large number of utilities that come with the system release. Make sure the voice system is stopped before running any of them, but the utilities that help you configure the system (mkcfg, config.sh, ConfigGen for starts) are all here as I mentioned earlier. Type ./ to run them, bearing in mind it will be case sensitive. If you're not using a D/41JCT card, you will have to mess around with these. It's worth repeating that any sort of configuration utility you run will likely generate something in /usr/dialogic/cfg/ . dialogic.cfg is probably the only file you'll need to worry about, but you'll want to move it to /usr/dialogic/avaya/cfg/ for it to be of any use. This would probably be a good time to mention that I know my help on this hasn't exactly been great. All I can really do is come clean and say I'm sorry; I'm not trying to be a dick or anything - when it became clear that you couldn't use anything except Avaya's weird linear predictive codec to record things with this release of Audix, I honestly started to lose interest pretty fast. I'll still help as best as I can. I just didn't expect there to be so many people asking about this when I repurposed the cards to do things that match more closely with what I like in telephony. You should be fine as far as licensing is concerned if the system can actually start. If I remember right, the system is supposed to start up an X environment with an old version of Netscape that you can do remote administration on. Can you tell me what running 'startx' does? The alternative option is to set up an ethernet interface and try going to the Apache server it gets up. To do this, type 'ifconfig -a | more'. If there's any interface besides lo0 (loopback) on there and it has an IP address, you can just go to that IP in your browser. If there's none, that would likely indicate a driver issue. If there's an interface (let's use eth0 for this example, since it's the most common) without an IP address, you may need to set up a network script. Type 'cd (slash)etc(slash)sysconfig(slash)network-scripts', (Readers, replace the "(slash)" with the proper forwardslash character. I had to do this to get around a bug in the forum software that prevents it from being rendered. Long story. Yet for some bizarre reason it didn't seem to care about all the paths thoughtphreaker listed a couple paragraphs up. Whatever. -scratchytcarrier) and then 'ls ifcfg*'. You'll probably see at least one script, like ifcfg-lo0. If there's none for your network adapter (for example ifcfg-eth0 for eth0), then type 'vi ifcfg-eth0' (or whatever your adapter's name is) at the command prompt. Press 'i', and then type these three lines: DEVICE=eth0 (or alternatively, your alternate device name) BOOTPROTO=dhcp ONBOOT=yes Press escape, type ':w', ':q', and then reboot. When the system comes up, type 'ifconfig', and the adapter we just configured should come up with an IP address. Go to that IP in a browser on a machine that uses the same router. Try the tsc account; that's one of the highest privileged accounts available on the GUI.
  11. 904-266-9604 - Nortel key system owned by MCI/Verizon; Mister Rogers works here. +800-6669-5588 - China Telecom NIS rec, mildly weird stuff happens afterwards 416-591-0105 - One of many numbers that goes to a Octel VMS owned by Bell Canada, tells you you don't have access to the advanced intelligent network 800-483-0015 - Verizon office with Rolm PBX 603-746-0125 - Weird thingie on analog line, picks up with square wave beep 603-746-9911 - IVR, "Thank you for calling. Enter your user ID and press pound to continue." 480-792-3996 - PCAnywhere modem on Nortel PBX 307-782-9997 - "The number you have dialed is not authorized to receive incoming calls." <Nortel EDRAM digits> "085501" 307-782-0000 - <480 hertz beep in background> "Union Telephone operator, how can I help you?" - TOPS position, will dial local numbers for you. 360-985-1902 - Weird sounding dialtone
  12. Sure! https://openload.co/f/oQnm-Rx-i08/AUDIX_LX_app_soft.nrg https://openload.co/f/_Zs_lgNFWds/IALXR2.0.SP2.sp As I mentioned towards the beginning of the thread, it'll format your hard drive without asking when the installer boots. Once you boot it, aside from the steps I talked about a couple posts before this, it'll set everything up.
  13. I dunno. To be honest, I've mostly stopped associating the age of equipment with any sort of relative interest; it's more about uniqueness. Superficially speaking, I guess the DMS-10 and the 4E are the oldest switches in the network when you think about design age. But the hardware has gone through a lot of revisions since it was first put in; a DMS-10 from 1977 isn't going to use PowerPC processors, SDRAM, or DSPs. The trunk cards are bound to be a lot smaller, larger capacity, and all that. One of my current theories is that DMS-10s with an Expanded Network configuration (if I understand correctly, Nortel underwent a project to revise the DMS-10's internal TDM network in the nineties, and significantly expand it's capacity in the process) may generate it's tones in a different way from the classic configuration, so for example the offhook tone won't have that characteristic weird modulation, and the ring will be a bit different. At some point, I'd like to make an up close and personal visit to a phone line served off two switches I know for sure are/aren't using this new configuration; I've seen some DMS-10s do some weird things, like bring you right to reorder if you flash from a payphone (and then to permanent signal if you do it again) that I'd like to compare side by side. Getting back to my point though, there's some stuff like older code (albeit maybe ported to a more recent OS depending on the switch) you're probably never going to get away from, but it's a bit superficial to say a switch is more or less old just because it's a certain model. That's a good question; there's a guy in IRC who was looking into C5 trunking not too long ago. I haven't been making that many international calls recently to be honest. But IRC and the conference are where most of the goings on are these days. At least judging by the regulars we get there, that's partly why the forums have been a bit empty. To be honest, I feel like I've been stretched thin for content at the moment between the rising numbers in the other two and some sudden shifts in real life circumstances. Anyway, I'd be surprised if everybody there wouldn't be down to help you with this. I definitely would be . I'm not exactly sure what you mean by old fashioned here, but I'm going to take a wild guess and throw this your way: ais_xtalk.flac This came as a complete surprise to me calling the Onancock, Virginia 5ESS a while ago. I'm going to go out on a limb here, and guess the recording I'm trying to dial is one you've heard about a million times if you've called any place Verizon hasn't sold off to another company yet. But more importantly, it shows that wherever there's robbed bit trunking, some circuit switches, and a situation where you really don't need more than just a destination and possibly ANI associated with a call, some switch engineer not wanting to chew up STP resources will throw everything up over a trunk with MF. At one point, I talked to someone who worked at a tiny, middle of nowhere telco about this particular scenario. From what he said, it sounds like it's common to reuse older T-carrier equipment occasionally that breaks channels out to 4-wire E&M instead of offering any sort of digital interface. They had some really old Lenkurt carrier system for 911 that did just this. Anyway, at some point, he thought the transmit and receive leads on one of the channels must've shorted. If you're looking to play with trunks, a lot of this stuff is hiding in plain view; for example, I learned from a reliable source that a certain large company's private T-carrier network (hint: it's one with lots of Rolms, and it isn't Macys) uses DTMF for inter-office signaling. I know this is possibly getting away from the premise of being oldschool, but getting back to the whole thing about DMS-10s, someone I know is served out of one from an independent telco. Being the good sport that they are, they were nice enough to let me play with the dialout feature on their APMax voicemail, (why almost literally every independent DMS-10 has one of these boxes, I may never know. Though aside from that ridiculous voice they have, they're not bad) since they noticed it was a bit...off. Sure enough, there's a bunch of six digit codes that terminate straight to a 5ESS tandem - I think an operator service one a long ways away from the switch. Several seven digit codes leave you stuck on a completely different tandem switch - I think for local stuff. Anyway, one of my pseudo-long term projects has been trying to figure out what exactly this is going to, why, and if it can be used to make some odd things happen. I'm optimistic to say the least. I'm not going to tell you the phone network is extremely relevant to every part of everyone's life. With the FCC stuff going on right now (long story short, same culprits as the net neutrality mess, same characteristic 180 on previous policies/ignoring of all objecting input, even from the industry. PM me if you want more info on what's going on/who is challenging the decision; the forum really isn't the place for this), it could potentially be in problematic shape down the road. But what I will say is when you explain what phreaking is all about to anybody in any technical circle - even when you get into tiny dry details, people listen. You wouldn't necessarily know it by the forums, but the community is growing too; I routinely hear new voices on the conference, something we could barely pitch up for two hours with four people when it started. Now we're entering territory where five hours isn't unusual, and it occasionally gets too crowded to get a word in. Here's my personal take on it: as the decade progresses, we've been sliding into a period where the internet is increasingly compulsory for things like work, but also the platform for an increasingly narrow set of companies, an increasingly politicized medium, and increasingly less anonymous. When you tell people there's a worldwide network that's can still be anonymous, as challenging as it is detailed and unique, and free of much of the drama from current events, the ideas behind being an 31337 phr34kz0r start to make some sense. The more creating, the more exploring and above all, the more inspiring that can be done... well, it can't hurt.
  14. The old version of Redhat comes with the software; when you boot the Audix installer, it'll write that to the hard drive. All the software you need to get it going is on there.
  15. I know this is a little overdue, but for anybody not too familiar with Linux, installing Audix is pretty straightforward. Before you start whatever machine will be running this, make sure the rotary switch on the card is set to zero; this helps identify the card ID to the software. Apparently, this matters a little less with the Windows drivers. Anyway, after booting the install CD, it'll copy all the install packages and reboot the system. Once it's booted, you'll get a login prompt. Type root at it, and you should get a command line. At there, type: mkdir /mnt/cdrom mount /dev/cdrom /mnt/cdrom vi /vs/bin/start_vs_now (there will be a single line in this script that tries to verify the hard drive serial before allowing the system to start. Press 'i' to input data using the text editor, and then put a '#' in front of the command. This will comment out the command, making the system skip the step. Press escape when you're done, and then ':w'. It should say it wrote the file. ':q' will get you out of there. Finally, type: ./mnt/cdrom/autoinstall This should get everything off the ground. Once it's done installing, barring any Dialogic software conflicts, it should Just Work. Anything else can be administered from the web interface. As I said before though, keeping a machine like this exposed to anything near the open internet is likely an extreme liability. Anyway, typing 'dmesg | more' should give insight into any additional conflicts. Use space and enter to scroll down; all the Dialogic messages will be at the very end. Also, when the system boots, it'll attempt to check for loop current on the phone line. If it can't find it or just feels like being annoying, sometimes it'll put the line in a state where it's permanently offhook, and stop paying attention to it. To get it to behave, tell it to run a diagnostic on the line and it'll check again. To do this, you may have to busy it out (MANOOS) before testing, and release when you're through. One final note - for anybody thinking about a D/41EPCI (also called a D/41ESC-PCI) card - if you know you're only ever going to use it for Audix - and just this version, there's a slight chance you may be able to get it to work; the old Dialogic 5.x system releases support the card, and a lot of the other weird odds and ends like ISA cards. I found an E locally for like, five bucks, shrugged and picked it up. So far, the system seems to turn it's nose up at it (though it was a little beat up to be fair. There's definitely a component that'll have to be resoldered, and possibly a cut trace). The current releases, however, won't work with it, so the development potential (or just the not running it on a really old OS potential) for them is quite limited. According to random people on the internet, they're half duplex anyway, The long and the short of it though, is it's probably not worth the $3 or whatever you'll save. If you do have one however, you'll have to avoid the pre-written config files the Avaya people put on there. There'll be some utilities you can use in the /usr/dialogic/bin folder to write a new one for this specific card; I think mkcfg and config.sh . Make sure it writes it to the /usr/dialogic/avaya/cfg/ directory (the path may not be exact on that one; I'm not in front of Audix, and the system I ran it on for like, a day was quickly repurposed for ISDN things). EDIT: Sorry. The start_vs_now script is copied after the autoinstall script does it's thing. Do it after ./mnt/cdrom/autoinstall