sickreizin

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About sickreizin

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    I broke 10 posts and all I got was this lousy title!

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  1. Try putting the flash drive into the computer before you even boot up.
  2. Feds already focus on hackers. Every hacker board has a few feds lurking on it and this becomes more frequent the sketchier the site it. Once you get to board where people are packing and distributing trojans, packers, etc you can be sure that place is thick with 'em. Every 2600 meeting has a fed showing up to it if it's of any significant size, etc. Feds are always trying to get evidence to convict people. Sometimes those people actually did shit and sometimes they didn't. As long as feds exist, this problem will always exist especially for hackers. Will the lulzsec attacks make them start trolling around to investigate 'em? Yup. Will/has Wikileaks caused the same thing? Yup. Just because the cops are everywhere doesn't mean we're losing. It shows how scared they are of people with hacking skills and what they could do with them. Even for the white hat/infosec pro this is a good thing as it means people are taking security seriously. It seems like that is what lulzsec is all about anyways: making companies and governments take security seriously, fucking some people who royally deserve it, and getting some lulz in along the way. Go lulzsec. Sure they'll most likely get caught and most likely soon but if they play their cards right, they might not get much time. Look at this for an example of somebody who outsmarted the authorities and got off with insanely small time: https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Lucio_Urtubia With all the access lulzsec has to so many systems, they may indeed have all the cards in their hands when they get busted. Then again... judging on the history of things like Operation Sundevil and how many awesome hackers got caught up in that, they'll probably just end up copping to everything and rolling on all their friends.
  3. Hackbloc Releases HackThisZine #12! (from https://hackbloc.org/content/hackthiszine-12-released) Hackbloc is proud to announce the newest release of our zine, HackThisZine. You can grab copies pre-formatted for online reading and printing at https://hackbloc.org/zine. HackThisZine is an online and in-print periodical about hacking, hacktivism, social struggle, computer security, and anarchism. It's got a little content for everybody and a lot of content for that special someone. This issue has a ton of new tools, interviews, and more! Inside: Quick and Dirty Guide To a Fairly Secure Twitter Gateway FBI Makes Big Media Splash While Attempting to Prosecute Anonymous Court Documents in Case Against Goatse Hackers Reveal Unknown Snitches Anonymizing Logs with LogRotate Interview with TorrentFreak.com A Phone Home Script for Hostile Environments How to Use Electronic Dead Drops and Feel Like a KGB Agent Using Secure Pastebin Services to Beef Up Your Email Security How to Make a Network Tap .. and much more news, reportbacks, and tools from the front lines of hacktivism. Questions? Comments? Article Submissions? Get a hold of us at: staff [at] hackbloc [dot] org. We can get bulk copies for distro and for your infoshop/social center/space. Thanks to everyone who helps keep our bits flowing securely and to everyone who helped work on this issue of the zine: Ringo, Discordia, Anonymous, The Pirate Bay, 2600, the Bay Area Anarchist Bookfair, Bradley Manning, the Wikileaks Crew, alxciada, anders, flatline, evoltech, sally, sexy hexy, frenzy, AnarchistNews.org (good work with the /ban trolls), postmodern modulus III, RiseUp.net, March-Hare Collective and everyone else who we forgot that is working to protect and support the struggle. Thanks to all of those resisting police violence in their communities, all those facing state oppression, and those engaged in the struggle everywhere.
  4. "Tor is getting more attacks every year; I2P is lacking a formal review by knowledgeable security guru's. So, you have Freenet or some custom protocol to work with." More FUD about Tor, where is all this coming from? You could say the same thing about Firefox. People finding holes is good, it means the system is being made more secure. There's a lot of active security developers looking at the code, the design etc of Tor and the same can't be said for Freenet or especially I2P. This doesn't mean Tor is better, just that it's not any less trustable than anything else because security flaws were found it. Of those found, almost all of them have been fixed. A few remain, which Tor reminds you of when you download it and requires a very sophisticated adversaries to successfully pull off.
  5. In the United States, they're legally protected as Online Service Providers. If somebody does something illegal and stupid with a proxy, they hold the legal responsibility not the proxy provider. This is how networks like Tor are allowed to operate legally even when most Tor servers publicly don't keep logs. Luckily, some people are smarter than to just roll over when some suits come knocking. Anonymity has a purpose and there's ways to catch people aside from proxy logs called good investigative work.
  6. Also keep in mind that Torchat, as of around six months ago was unmaintained and the person who wrote the code went AWOL. Could be that this is full of holes and there doesn't seem to be any peer review on it, as opposed to the Tor IM Bundle.
  7. Thought I'd post this community announcement here. Snitching has hurt many of the people in the hacking community, let's change that. Taken from https://hackbloc.org/content/court-documents-case-against-goatse-hackers-reveal-use-confidential-informants Do you know who the informant was? Contact Hackbloc Staff at staff@hackbloc.org For those who haven't been following the story, Daniel Spitler and Andrew Auernheimer, alleged members of the computer security group Goatse have been charged with Conspiracy to Access a Computer Without Authorization and Fraud in Connection with Personal Information for their alleged role in exposing a major flaw in the way AT&T was storing the personal information of iPad users. The email addresses of many in rich and powerful circles was open to exposure including members of the White House Staff. While the Department of Justice claims these two "hacked into" AT&T databases, the reality is that they simply queried them a number of times. On a public-facing web page, you could ask the database who was associated with which hardware ID and it would tell you. In a court document posted on Cryptome, it's revealed that a confidential informant provided IRC chat logs to the FBI. According to the affidavit, "Approximately one month after the search of defendant Auernheimer's home, a confidential source (the "CS") contacted federal law enforcement officers and stated, among other things, that the CS routinely monitored "#dominion," one of the IRC channels used by Goatse Security members to communicate with one another. The CS also provided law enforcement officers with chat logs from the "#dominion" channel from on or about June 2, 2010 through on or about June 11, 201 O. Extending over 150 pages, those chat logs conclusively demonstrate that defendants Spitler and Auernheimer were responsible for the data breach and conducted the breach to simultaneously damage AT&T and promote themselves and Goatse Security. Excerpts from the chat logs are provided below." While there was a snitch within IRC channel, it appears that Goatse members have also offered to work with the Department of Justice "hand in hand for a stronger country" which is all somebody would need to not trust the goatse folks. Future informants against other "malicious hackers"? The idea unfortunately isn't that far-fetched. It shouldn't be hard to figure out who this snitch was in this case given that they were idling in an IRC room for extensive periods of time. We must protect our communities against snitches who will sell their friends down the river in exchange for legal immunity, status, nationalism, or anything else. Snitching only weakens our community, divides it, and sows distrust into our relationships. Find snitches, publicly out them, and excommunicate them from our community! A statement was posted on the goatse site which is copied below: "On the heels of the arrest of two of Goatse Security’s researchers, I felt compelled to write a statement reiterating a few points regarding last year’s AT&T breach which I believe are important: 1. The only data gathered was a list of e-mail addresses. No real names, mailing addresses, or any associated data was breached. 2. The data gathered was PUBLICLY AVAILABLE on AT&T’s web server. Any person could say “What is the e-mail address associated with ID XXXXXXXX” and the server would happily reply “johndoe@yahoo.com” or “invalid ID”. The process of doing so was simply automated using random IDs. There was no “real” hacking involved. 3. Through intermediary channels, Goatse Security notified AT&T of the hole in their system and waited until it had been patched before we made our disclosure. 4. Under no circumstances was the data EVER made public. It was only given to Gawker Media under the condition that it would be redacted, just as proof that the data *HAD* been leaked and this was not a fictitious claim. 5. AT&T has pressured the USDoJ and the FBI into building and prosecuting a baseless case because they care more about their own share price than their customers. Stated another way: the American government works at the behest of private corporations. AT&T, the FBI, and the prosecution have labelled this as a “malicious” attack, directly against AT&T’s interests and their customers. This could not be farther from the truth. The flaw was quite literally stumbled upon; AT&T was never targeted, and upon gathering the data, it was not sold, distributed, or used otherwise (although it certainly had the potential to be used quite maliciously) – it was only disseminated to a single media outlet because we believed it was important enough to share. Were the hole discovered by a malicious party, the data could have been easily sold to the RBN at a very high price, could have been used to target iPad owners with AT&T phishing e-mails, the e-mails could have been sent iPad trojans, or otherwise. The private discussions we had to determine the extent of the flaw will undoubtedly be twisted and redacted by the prosecution to create an appearance of malice, as these were all topics touched upon. This can be damning even though the discussion itself is not a crime. The case is based entirely upon IRC logs, anonymously submitted, which could be completely fabricated with no method of verification. The transcripts of these logs are solely being used to create an image of malicious intent. The fact of the matter is quite simple: AT&T put their own customers at risk through negligence, their share price dropped when this fact was exposed, and they have now co-opted the USDoJ and the FBI to attempt to shift the blame from themselves to individuals who were looking out for the public good. In the end, regardless of how the chat logs are made to appear, the facts do not change: GoatSec researchers found a hole, made sure it was closed, and responsibly disclosed its existence."
  8. Some folks got arrested for allegedly using twitter during the G20 protests this past year. There's some good info about the raid at https://friendsoftortuga.wordpress.com/. These raids absolutely do still happen. Also, the guy who allegedly hacked Palin's email account had his house raided. The FBI is also doing raids in response to Anonymous's "Operation Payback".
  9. For those who have accounts on this site, they were kind enough to send a warning message to your email address. Just another reminder to not use the same password for everything ; ) For every database put online, theres another ten than were probably never put online and used for private exploits. Keep your bits secure!
  10. Hackbloc is proud to announce the newest release of our zine, HackThisZine. You can grab copies pre-formatted for online reading and printing at https://hackbloc.org/zine. This issue provides extensive coverage of Wikileaks, Cablegate, Operation Payback, and much much more. HackThisZine is an online and in-print periodical about hacking, hacktivism, social struggle, computer security, and anarchism. It's got a little content for everybody and a lot of content for that special someone. Analysis and Coverage of Operation Payback (the continuing campaign of Anonymous to target those who threaten freedom on the internet) Thoughts on Intelligence (how hackers should be building distributed intelligence networks) Maps That Matter - Considerations for Seccessful Cartographic Communication by the March Hare Communications Collective News from the Electronic Battlefront - Coverage of Wikileaks - Coverage of recent border detainment of Jake Appelbaum, Moxie Marlinspike, and others at international borders. - Facebook adds secret "delete account" option - Snitch Darren Thurston Offering "Computer Security" advice Action Reports - Carbon Trading Exchange Defaced - Wikileaks Releases - V for Vendetta Hacker Hits Washington State University - Send an Email, Save a Rioter Reportback from HOPE 2010 New Tools - Firesheep instant session-jacking (how to steal somebodie's Facebook accounts and more!) - How to get past the iPhones "lock" screen with a secret backdoor - Googlesharing Proxy - How to crack MasterLocks Questions? Comments? Article Submissions? Get a hold of us at: staff [at] hackbloc [dot] org. We can get bulk copies for distro and for your infoshop/social center/space. Thanks to everyone who helps keep our bits flowing securely and to everyone who helped work on this issue of the zine: Ringo, Discordia, Anonymous, The Pirate Bay, 2600, the Bay Area Anarchist Bookfair, Bradley Manning, the Wikileaks Crew, alxciada, anders, flatline, evoltech, sally, sexy hexy, frenzy, AnarchistNews.org (good work with the /ban trolls), postmodern modulus III, RiseUp.net, March-Hare Collective and everyone else who we forgot that is working to protect and support the struggle. Thanks to all of those resisting police violence in their communities, all those facing state oppression, and those engaged in the struggle everywhere. NOTE: Due to time and space constraints we were unable to include an article on the intricacies of the Assange rape case. A short summary of some thoughts is available on our site. Basically, just because he's Assange doesn't mean he isn't capable of sexual assault. In situations like this, it is important to take the allegations seriously and not silence alleged survivors simply because the truth is inconvenient for supporters of Assange and Wikileaks.