jeremy

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Everything posted by jeremy

  1. I am working on some services that will only be available over Tor's hidden services. I've documented on my Onionland article on what hidden services are and how to access these sites. Here are some of the projects I'm working on: Onionland mirror of Area51 ArchivesOnionland search engine based off of YacyMutli-lingual starter kits for onionland browsingIf you are interested in my progress or would like to help, feel free to contact me.
  2. A power supply unit doesn't have firmware. Your friend lost the competition because he was an idiot.
  3. First OS: Windows 3.1 First encounter w/ Linux: Red Hat 9, then Fedora, then Ubuntu. I will most likely change distros soon as GNOME 3 and Unity suck horribly and both have ruined Ubuntu for me.
  4. When you start a project, there are a lot of demands. You might have a lot of help, too. As time goes on, however, help fades away. Sometimes your personal life has to take priority over your hobbies. Sometimes, you just get tired of your hobbies. The demands don't go away though, so you're left with a project that is too big for the time that people had to pour into it. That, my friends, was the tale of DocDroppers. The idea of DocDroppers is simple- a library for hacking-related articles. With having an open registration system, you would think the content would pour in, and it did. At the same time, the spam poured in. This was annoying, but then it because so much to manage that everyone dropped the ball on the site, and you can't blame anyone for it. So, because of this, the site has been scrapped, and a completely new wiki and site has replaced it. Most of the non-spam articles have been migrated, but not all (manually going through over 7,000 pages of spam is no easy task). Go ahead and visit docdroppers.org yourself and check it all out! During this process of migrating the remaining articles, the entire old site is now hosted at legacy.docdroppers.org. If you wish to find articles that haven't been migrated, just create an account on the new wiki, and copy and paste the source from the old wiki article. Feel free to leave your complaints, questions and suggestions as a reply here.
  5. Any time there is a normal service outage, he has some kind of conspiracy behind it. So fucking stupid.
  6. Get a better thumbdrive, a 4gb costs $10 now. http://www.geteasypeasy.com/ was designed for Eeepc's.
  7. Torchat's gotcha covered. http://code.google.com/p/torchat/ Also, look at the Tor Browser Instant Messaging Bundle for use with traditional IM networks. http://www.torprojec...ownload.html.en
  8. Welcome to sarcasm. LOL
  9. Joining random forums around the web and posting links without contributing to the forum at all is a good start. Also, using the name of the site as your username is a good idea, so that people establish a sense of legitimacy when you talk about your product. Posting links in comments of YouTube videos that are very popular help as well. Add animated gifs to your site, it's a fun way of establishing your brand. Instead of having everything anonymous, you should sell your user's information to 3rd parties and include traffic monitoring cookies. Remember, the key to a successful website isn't about treating your users well or making a functional website, it's about making money as quickly and unethically as possible!!
  10. Truecrypt is really fast. The files will be decrypted in a matter of seconds.
  11. I would suggest using a Truecrypt file container of 4.5gb for each disk with the Serpant/Twofish/AES encryption algorithm and the Whirlpool hash algorithm. Choose a very random password and keyfiles. Keyfiles are files that have to be present at the time of encryption and decryption that act as keys to unlock the files. I highly suggest keyfiles because even if someone could arrest both parties and get the password somehow, they would need to know which keyfiles were used, which would be even more impossible than guessing the password. With a complex password alone and using the algorithms posted, even the US government would not be able to crack the encryption. An example of a good password: 567E8B9CCC23D7519C10AAA4C4AE4D060EA1348E98DA4D068FE5E6C9E04FAD21ya8DQ0qt3Bc3Z80FdnUX6AhTLnEmUERLvdx4pjxDI83sMRPYQncIWwzFMtTR22i Links: http://truecrypt.org More information on keyfiles: http://www.truecrypt...chnical-details A very good password generator: https://www.grc.com/passwords.htm
  12. Dropping docs won't solve anything. What is happening to them is stupid, I agree. But snitching isn't going to change anything- a retaliation may actually make things worse. The guys knew they could potentially face charges for what they did, and they obviously didn't do enough to protect themselves from being found. I "hacked" into all of computer hosting company's websites by downloading a database file that was hosted in a publicly accessible directory. I knew that even though this wasn't much of a "hack", with current laws, I could find myself in a lot of trouble, even though I was 15. I emailed the company's owner and the next day talked to him over the phone and recorded the phone call. He thanked me and even offered me a job. Later, he threatened legal action against me for it, but I had the recording with him thanking me for it. He didn't pursue any actions but if he had, I would have still most likely been just as guilty as those guys. Since then, I never bothered disclosing vulnerabilities without taking overly-extreme measures to protect myself. Maybe the community should concentrate their energy on learning how to remain anonymous instead of trying to find someone for revenge.
  13. http://larryo.org/work/information/umouse/http://blog.makezine.com/archive/2008/11/hand_gesture_multitouch_u.html?CMP=OTC-0D6B48984890 http://hackaday.com/2007/11/09/wiimote-ir-finger-tracking/ ^All DIY gesture control solutions. It's not perfect, but in my experience, gesture controls work pretty well.
  14. http://en.wikipedia....ork)#Weaknesses Tor is actually pretty fast when compared to other darknets/anonymity networks. I use Tor everyday on my phone and desktops, and it's slow, but worth it. I don't bother using Tor for WWW sites, I use it to access Onionland. Tor is your only choice, other than a VPN (which can be easily traced back to you), to surf the Web. You can look at I2P and Freenet, but those aren't the same as Tor. They do not connect to the Web as an anonymous router, they are separate networks altogether. I just pretend it's dial-up and deal with it.
  15. QFT If you want to do a good senior prank, edit the registry and make all the computers boot into PROGMAN.EXE instead of Explorer.exe. The computers will boot into the shell that Windows 3.1 used, and will confuse everyone, I'm sure. I did it to my school the day before I got expelled (for other things) and they ended up buying all new computers. It should give you a few laughs.
  16. Truecrypt isn't made by the same people, but it does feature the same "scribble your mouse in a box" technique to generate a more random section of bits to create it's encryption key with. The true identities of the Truecrypt developers are unknown. Another difference between the two is that Flexcrypt is closed source and has a free (as in beer) home use license, but has paid commercial licenses, unlike Truecrypt, which is free (as in beer) and open source for all organizations. Truecrypt was also able to stand up against the FBI in a 12-month long brute forcing attack in a corporate fraud case in Brazil. I personally use an unencrypted installation of Ubuntu at home and Windows 7 at work. At home, I have an encrypted Ubuntu Home folder, which contains hardly anything, and the rest of my files are contained in a Trucerypt virtual drive encrypted using AES/Twofish/Serpant and SHA-512. To open the drive, it requires my password which is a randomly generated 63-character ASCII password and a SHA-512 key file. I have this virtual drive for all my normal files, and then a smaller virtual drive using the same encyption method for my USB stick.
  17. Setting a BIOS password is an option, but all it takes to remove the BIOS password is removing the battery on the motherboard. A lot of computer cases have the option to put a pad lock on the pack of the case, so that may be a good option for you. Whole disk encryption isn't going to slow your computer down like you think it will. You can encrypt your home folder in Linux relatively easy, and if you use Windows, you can use EFS to encrypt your file system. http://en.wikipedia....ing_File_System But if you do not want to encrypt your hard drive or use a BIOS password, and want very light security (security by obscurity) by requiring a password to boot your OS, you could install the GRUB bootloader and password protect that. http://www.makeuseof...-entries-linux/. This virtually protects you from nothing, though. If anyone can get on your computer, they can bypass this easily. I'd highly recommend a whole disk encryption system, even if it's not fail proof.
  18. There are plenty of programs for this. PGP and Truecrypt are a couple. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Full_disk_encryption#Security_concerns explains some issues with non-hardware based encryption schemes.
  19. can't wait to switch from iPhone to Droid X!

  20. It's kinda like The Da Vinci Code, or National Treasure... taking real places and events to make a work of fiction. HAARP does have the power to manipulate weather, search for underground oil/gas/bases/submarines, and a very slight form of mind control, which affects people's mood. http://tehhaxtv.com/2009/12/14/conspiracy-theory-haarp/
  21. For Windows, Free Music Zilla works very well.