Coder(365)

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About Coder(365)

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  1. First things are first: Stank, lattera, random-moderator-who-I-don't-know: Feel free to move this to the 'Hacker Media' portion. I didn't bother putting this there due to the sheer amount of clutter caused by those automated posts. Anyway... I'm asking, on behalf of wget and bash users everywhere - can we PLEASE get the BRR episodes into a single, public, directory? I understand why they were tacked onto the forums. Hell, during the rebuild (If you're 15 and don't know what the hell I'm talking about when I say 'rebuild', just ignore that and keep reading) you guys started from pretty much the ground up. I also know these shows aren't in production any longer. That shouldn't matter. "But.. but... but... you can just go over to Jason Scott and get them all!" Wrong. Jason only archived through episode 186 (at least, that he's made available for download). So, attempts to finally complete the collection go from something like... $ for episode in $(seq 100 200); do wget http://binrev.com/brr/brr$episode.mp3; done Instantly becomes an exercise in pulling teeth and frustration because it's a giant pain in the fucking dick to automate things when they're attached to a forum! Sorry if I'm ranting, or if I piss off folks in the process. Really though, as a System Administrator, I pride myself on making things easier, not more difficult. I can remember a time when this discussion wouldn't have ever happened. What changed?
  2. Tech License, loosely studying for the General. Licensed since 2004
  3. When setting up my router for OpenWRT, I used Shorewall as the front-end for iptables. It makes things so much easier to configure.
  4. Actually it helped out a lot. If I change the code to this (below) it works great! Thanks NotTheory! rec -t wav -q - silence 1 1 10% -1 7 2% | lame -S --resample 11025 -b 24 - /hamradio/audio/$file_prefix-$date.mp3 cat /dev/dsp1 | rec -t wav -q - |lame -S --resample 11025 -b 24 - - | ezstream -c /hamradio/scripts/stream.xml I took the "sleep 2" out because it wasn't needed. Edit: I removed the ampersand from the end of each command so the forum would parse it correctly. For those that don't know the ampersand ( & ) puts the command into the background.
  5. I'm building a streaming and recording server for a local volunteer group. I've been trying to find a way to either... ... record audio from the sound card, process it and stream it OR ... record audio on one card, process and save. and use the other sound card for streaming (2 cards needed). I've come to the conclusion that option 2 is the best route, and I've began to tailor my shell script towards that. But... I've run into a snag. Here's the issue. I can't find a way to specify the device for SoX to use when recording. Any Ideas? rec -t wav -q - silence 1 1 10% -1 7 2% | lame -S --resample 11025 -b 24 $file_prefix-$date.mp3 & sleep 2 rec -t wav -q - | lame -S --resample 11025 -b 24 - - | ezstream -c /hamradio/scripts/stream.xml &
  6. Speaking of April Fools jokes, anyone remember 4/1/05?
  7. Torpark = The bomb. My friends at school are trying to find decent web proxies, which probably log passwords, while I just throw my key on the computer. thats the great thing about it. you arent even using the web browser on that computer youre running the portable firefox off of your thumb drive and its all encrypted and runs through tor. so its all good. This only works if the admins are brain-dead enough to let you run a binary off of another device or run a binary (asside from IE, MS office stuff, and other "essentials") at all. This would most likely send off of a shit load of red-flags and make the firewall go ape shit on the logs. Sure nobody can see what you are doing, but you will most likely attract allot of attention, I know if I was an admin and I saw shit like that pass through my logs I would investigate. Hell, with a cryptic user name like that it could be a rootkit. Again, it is not a question of the admin's knowing what exactly you are doing, but just the fact that they know you are doing something out of the ordinary will cause scrutiny. Try and do something that will not leave such a big footprint, network wise. I have a feeling that a 5 day suspension is an exaggeration. If the suspension piece is true, you really need to talk to your school. Alternatively you could be more proactive rather than subversive and protest: get kids to sign a petition, try and get parents involved. I would do all that first, and even if you do not get MySpace back you should at least be able to remove some of the penalties for viewing it... if it is a 5 day suspension. As a Network Administrator for a school district I'd like to shed some light on this subject. Now, before I begin I would like to remind everyone that I have been on the opposite side of the fence, I know it sucks. I've been there. That being said... Your IT Department is just covering their ass by using extensive content filtering. They're required to under the Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA). I'm not going to quote it word-for-word, but it basically says that if your IT Dept. knowingly allows students to get to stuff like pornography they can be thrown in jail. Personally, I don't have a problem with pornography, but school is not the time or the place to be viewing it. And... I'm not going to jail because you need to jack off in your English 101 class. Also, (at least in the district I work for) myspace is considered a legal liability for various reasons. we simply cannot allow access to it. Thus the strict penalties. We will revoke internet access if students are caught circumventing our content filtering. That's all there is to it. I'm going to agree with both Alk3 and baby-hackribus here by saying this... While Alk3's method of circumvention will work under most circumstances, B.H. is correct in stating that alarms are going to be going off all over the place once someone looks at the logs. It has happened before..... 1.2GB of traffic to a Comcast Residental DSL line really raises eyebrows... Bottom Line: Don't test your luck, you're most likely going to get caught.
  8. I hope you don't expect a real answer to that question, especially on a public forum. However the fact that OreoX stated Middle Tennessee (931) should be enough to let you know he's willing to travel. I'll talk with him and see if this is still an interest, this thread is going on 2 years old...
  9. I don't necessarily think a specific distro is the key to building something like that. However, I do think that the tools you use make a huge difference. Oh, as for forgetting the root password... grab a live cd like knoppix or others and clear the root pw in /etc/shadow.
  10. kazoo is fine with me. its still a drive but better than GH/GR. *shrugs*
  11. Thanks for the clarification Ohm, I didn't notice that very important point. I was under the assumption that it was an existing ssh server and had been in place for a length of time.
  12. It really depends on the topographical layout of the network. If someone is ARP spoofing, then you'll need to sniff the traffic yourself and look for ARP packets that 'say' that more than one host is at a given IP address. Example... Host1 (01020304) 192.168.1.2 Host2 (04050607) 192.168.1.3 Attacker (aabbccdd) 192.168.1.10 The ARP traffic would look something like this. "Who has 192.168.1.2, tell 192.168.1.3" "AA:BB:CC:DD has 192.168.1.2" (Attacker's MAC address) "Who has 192.168.1.3, tell 192.168.1.2" "AA:BB:CC:DD has 192.168.1.3" (Attacker's MAC address) [Edit: Wrong IP was here, fixed. ] That's the basic concept of ARP spoofing, if I recall correctly. All of this is a moot point if the attacker has split a cable and inserted a hub inbetween and is sniffing off of the hub. You probably won't be able to detect that unless you physically trace the network. This is especially true if the Attacker doesn't assign an IP address to their machine.
  13. I concur, I feel this special episode picks up where it was left off. I really like the community involvement this generates, and I know it was one of the goals. I hope we have many more episodes of Default to come. Cheers.
  14. That doesn't rule out it being infected...
  15. This may be off topic, so mods, feel free to move where needed. Anyway... It seems textfiles.com is down. At least part of it. I have not been able to get to any subdomains except ascii.textfiles.com, it should also be noted that cow.net, another Jason Scott website is currently up and running, along with his BBS Documentary. Anyone know why? Could it be a network issue? Or did someone run their car into his satellite dish... Thoughts?