Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/14/2016 in all areas

  1. 5 points
    Here's the complete collection of recordings I grabbed of the Odessa 1AESS switch before the cutover. The recordings were made during late may, with the last batch (A-D recordings) made on June 2, 2017 -- days before the cutover. The most interesting recordings I found during the calls to the switch: 1AESS-A.wav - Highest quality recording/best example I have of what a normal call to the 1AESS intercept sounded like. Allows you to hear the background SIT-tone noise before recordings. 1AESS-D.wav - Highest quality recording/best example I have of what a normal call to the 1AESS supervision test sounded like. 1AESS-3.wav - Bizarre because the switch cut to busy after intercept, instead of cutting over to reorder like normal. 1AESS-11.wav - Bizarre because the call, without ring, goes to the 1AESS intercept recording for one cycle, then stops for 20 seconds, and returns the Hillsboro 4ESS '121-T!' recording. 1AESS-14.wav - Bizarre because the call, rings once, goes silent for 30 seconds, then returns the Hillsboro 4ESS '121-T!' recording. 1AESS-15.wav - Bizarre because the call, rings once, goes silent for 40 seconds, then returns a reorder. More descriptions on the other calls are available on the 1A_desc.txt file on the dropbox drive. https://www.dropbox.com/sh/xca3wwskn1mzwzt/AABJMpTS0XDL9NQQgiz4LVI4a?dl=0 Enjoy.
  2. 4 points
    There's another number to that; 3438. If you're hitting a route that gives you g.729 (sorta ruins that catchy song), it's not a bad idea to try both a few times. Interestingly, the transcoding seems to come on after the C5 chirps; those (and sometimes some Australian sounding ring) are always clear as day. So now when I found this - I actually think I found it with radio_phreak, but when I did, I was about as excited as you can expect. But something wasn't quite right. If you do a RESPORG lookup on 3438/7, it comes back as using the MCI/0222 network. If you call the number directly terminating to the Malaysian destination (you'll find it with a bit of searching) over MCI though, it's end to end SS7. After trying a bunch of carriers with no success, the theory we wound up with is that they were re-originating via a third party country; likely Australia, to shave a few cents off termination charges. Interestingly, when you hop on a conference on that access number, it'll allow you the option to contact customer service for the company, which is based out of Denver. The route you get is _definitely_ not C5. For whatever it's worth, there was another number until semi-recently; 3439 that routed a little differently. Usually it was more likely to get a transcoded route, or other weird things - one route had 450 hertz ringback before the call went offhook quite a lot . But anyway, for whatever it's worth, during Hurricane Sandy it gave you an error recording from a Santera OCX. If I remember right, the other numbers worked fine though. One thing I've noticed is during that song they play for hold music, sometimes it likes to disconnect you in weird ways. The hold music in question passes some notes a few times that definitely sound like 2400 hertz, so I wonder if that has anything to do with it (maybe we should pay attention to the supervision status), or if it's just an apathetic operator hanging up on you. Incidentally, when the call tears down with 2600, you'll hear this curious reorder tone from the international gateway that sorta fades in and out. Based on this, I wonder if it's a type 1 EWSD: https://pastebin.com/q1dvEcVw . So this isn't exactly C5, but a while ago, I found some Axtel DMS logs on Scribd. No, seriously. You can see from there they have quite a few R2 trunks provisioned for end users: 142785363-switch-a.pdf . We were playing with this on the bridge a few months ago - something I sorta want to get into again at some point; a few people seemed pretty excited about it. There's one particular number, +52-818-114-1500 (on the AX2P42 trunk group; labeled STA_CATARINA_CALL_CENTER_PBX_R2. If you look at page 224, you'll see the trunk group type configuration for this and many others; there's a bunch of R2 trunks with generic labels) that will send a backwards 4 in MFC (780 + 1140 hertz)to the switch - indicating a network error when it messes up. Which it occasionally does. Dunno how or if these can be seized, but it seemed worth mentioning. Speaking of which, I don't have the number for this; I had the bright idea of putting it on the speed dial for a calling card and then letting it expire, but Russia has some sort of strange signaling - perhaps another R2 variant floating about in their network. This particular call I remember being to Siberia: weirdmfs.flac . A lot of their switches use whatever this is. It enables them to send vacant number conditions and such over their signaling network. All I do here besides try and hit some DTMF is whistle 2600 twice; once to seize the trunk, and another time to make the switch get all angry. The tones you hear are the standard R1 frequency set, but obviously an R1 trunk never barks MFs back at you. EDIT: Crap, I forgot about the Cuba stuff. From what I understand, Havana if no other place has a reasonably modern network of Alcatel gear. As for the fixed GSM terminals, there's some older documents on Cuban telecom infrastructure lying around. All of them seem to point towards the Cuban fixed network being very over capacity. That could have something to do with that particular addition. As for Paraguay, radio_phreak mentioned to me a while back a particular set of numbers that would route to C5 trunks over some carriers. I believe it was +595-528-222-xxx. Back to the C5 stuff though, does anybody know where we can find a protocol spec document for it? That'll probably help us with some of the oddities we've found on some of these trunk groups. Another EDIT: http://www.itu.int/rec/T-REC-Q.140-Q.180/en Holy shit, another EDIT: http://www.binrev.com/forums/index.php?/topic/47028-portugal/#comment-364799 portugal_c5.flac One (hopefully) last thing - for anybody looking for international credit, I've found http://www.call2.com to be pretty good for the most part. Most of their routes look to be resold MCI, the rates are reasonable, and it tends to be decent quality. It is a callback service though, so it can be a little clunky for a large number of calls like in a scan. DMS-10 loops can be a good way to make this a little less painful. I feel kinda gross giving out a plug like that, but given the relative obscurity of the service and the content of the thread, it seems appropriate.
  3. 4 points
    0800 890 595 is now a (quite rare) example of the equipment engaged tone. I haven't done much looking for interesting switching/signalling since the early 2000s. It's got more difficult now because most people and businesses in poor countries have jumped straight to GSM (+successors). Back then, it would (as radio_phreak notes) be much more productive to look in the provincial towns and cities of poor countries than in their main cities. My preferred method was to look online for hotels or businesses in those backwater areas, ideally finding their fax numbers, and call those. Much prefer bothering a fax machine than disturbing a person. Now-a-days you need to do this armed with the country's dialling plan (wikipedia usually has these) - and most of the numbers you find will be mobiles. Re Cuba, I can't reach the supposed second dialtone for the US base via +53 99. The state telco is marketing the "fija alternativa" service - ie a GSM-based fixed service - suggesting aged and interesting POTS equipment exists. Calling from here, it's evident that their international gateway is something not outrageously ancient, because it promptly returns an appropriate SS7 code for incorrect prefixes - eg +53 41 000000 returns the usual SIT+"the number you have dialled has not been recognised" from my local exchange. +53 xx 300000 returns a Cuban intercept - in Spanish then English - after about 5 seconds of delay, where XX is any of the 2-digit areacodes listed at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telephone_numbers_in_Cuba. Sadly no signalling sounds are evident during the delays - I think I've tried all of them. I had a quick look for hotels in Panama and all the phone numbers I found were +507 6xxx xxxxx - ie mobiles. However, again, I'm hopeful that downstream of the international gateway is something elderly and interesting. +507 900 0000 sometimes gives an intercept - Spanish only - mentioning C&W Panama, again with a significant post-dial delay. +507 800 0000 gives my local telco's equipment engaged tone. +507 811 1111 was answered by a human +507 700 0000 is a different Spanish intercept, with a longer post-dial delay. +507 600 0000 or 500 0000 give my local telco's SIT+number not recognised intercept. +507 400 0000 is the same intercept-after-delay as 900 0000. +507 300 0000 is yet another Spanish intercept, with delay. +507 200 0000 has a very long delay then something times out any my local telco plays SIT+"sorry, there is a fault". +507 210 0000 has a long delay then the 900 0000 intercept +507 220 0000 rings, again after a delay, and is answered by some sort of automated service - in Spanish. No signalling sounds or evident, for me, in any of the above :-(
  4. 3 points
    Long time lurker.... registered recently..... first post... I know this thread is a bit old, figured I could be of some assistance here: Auto-scanned the 630713XXXX exchange (Took about ~15 hours), then did some manual checking: Number Auto-Scan Result Manual Scan, Comments 6307130025 VOICE Voicemail 6307130027 VOICE Subscriber 6307130107 VOICE Voicemail 6307130138 VOICE Voicemail (Nokia) 6307130460 VOICE UMTS Operations Support Group (Nokia -- "Please try again in 15 minutes") 6307130484 VOICE "We're sorry, but the blackout period for the transtition of the 401k record keeper is in effect on January 6th, please call back on January 7th." Repeats, then hangs up. 6307130563 VOICE Subscriber 6307130760 VOICE "Thank you for calling the Nokia workplace resources call center." 6307130869 VOICE Voicemail 6307130990 VOICE Voicemail Access Number, with working directory. 6307130996 VOICE Voicemail Access Number, with working directory. 6307131006 VOICE Subscriber 6307131229 VOICE Subscriber 6307131265 VOICE "Sorry, this automated attendant number is not available at the moment, goodbye." 6307131292 VOICE Subscriber 6307131304 VOICE "The called extension is busy" >> Voicemail 6307131329 VOICE Subscriber 6307131335 VOICE Ring >> Reorder 6307131553 VOICE Voicemail 6307131984 FAX Fax tones 6307132349 FAX Fax tones 6307133200 VOICE Voicemail Access Number, with working directory. 6307133678 FAX Possibly a modem. 6307134150 VOICE Subscriber 6307134389 VOICE Subscriber 6307134433 VOICE Voicemail 6307134484 VOICE Subscriber 6307134633 VOICE Voicemail 6307134967 VOICE Voicemail 6307135012 VOICE Voicemail 6307135163 VOICE Voicemail (reads back extension number) 6307135305 FAX Possibly a modem. 6307135353 VOICE Voicemail 6307135400 VOICE Voicemail 6307136056 FAX Fax tones 6307136081 FAX Fax tones 6307136082 FAX Fax tones 6307136091 VOICE Possibly an elevator?? Buzzing/Static on line. Hangs up with #. 6307136153 VOICE Another elevator phone? Hangs up with # again. 6307137073 VOICE Subscriber 6307137163 VOICE Voicemail 6307137180 VOICE Voicemail 6307137339 VOICE Subscriber 6307138416 VOICE Subscriber 6307138507 VOICE Voicemail 6307138668 VOICE Voicemail 6307138761 VOICE Voicemail 6307139039 VOICE Voicemail 6307139328 VOICE Voicemail 6307139379 VOICE Subscriber 6307139650 VOICE Voicemail 6307139764 VOICE Voicemail 6307139885 VOICE Subscriber 6307139988 VOICE Voicemail If there's any interest I can run a scan on 630979XXXX.
  5. 3 points
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Debian
  6. 3 points
    This is just a beginning to get people started. Feel free to add onto more if you wish. The 'Threads' links you will see are from threads from these forums where the topic has been discussed before. I wrote this a few months ago so there may even be more threads about them if you search around. This list was made from numerous threads about the same topics; to stop the bitching from the Department of Redundancy Department. 1. How do I use exploits? ::Discussions - 1. ::Programs for assistance - Nmap and Nessus. ::Reference material - Security Focus, and Irongeek. 2. How do I get the admin password for Windows XP? ::Discussions - 1. ::Programs for assistance - Login recovery, and John the Ripper. ::Reference material - Password Recovery, Irongeek.com, and many others. I would suggest reading the discussion thread. 3. How do I hack a website? ::Discussions - 1 , 2, 3. 4. How do I get around web filtering like Websense? ::Discussions - 1, 2, 3. ::Programs for assistance - It is probally easier to use a proxy to get around web filtering software. ::Reference material - Babelfish, Proxy Blind, and Proxify. 5. What are proxies and how do they work? ::Discussions - 1, 2. ::Programs for assistance - There are tons of proxy server lists out there. Suggest doing a Google search for "Proxy", "Proxies", "Proxy Server", etc. ::Reference material - Wiki Proxy Info. 6. Where can I find more Hacker media like HackTV or BRR? For general Hacker Media information check out the Forums. ::Reference material - Hackermedia, Infonomicon, Old Skool Phreak, WhiteSword TV, Packet Sniffers, Hak5. 7. What are some good books to read that will teach me about hacking? This all depends on what you are interested in learning. ::Reference material - Cryptography, Programming, Networking, and Social Engineering. 8. Where can I find a meeting to attend, and what if no one is in my area? If no one is in your area then start up your own meeting, and let others know about it! ::Reference material - Bin Rev meetings - BRR listeners map, DefCon groups, 2600 meetings, and also search for a LUG (Linux User Group) in your area. 9. What Linux distro is the best? ::Discussions - 1. ::Reference material - Rundown on different distros, a test that may help you decide which is best for you, and you may also want to check out more distros' for yourself. 10. How do I learn how to hack? ::Discussions - 1, 2. 11. I want to program, where should I start? ::Discussions - 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22. C Book, Tutorial, Windows Compiler, *nix Compiler, *nix Compiler How-To. Python Website, Book, Tutorial, Compiler, Compiler How-To.
  7. 2 points
    "I spent three hours last year convincing the AT&T call center that they needed to get their line back on a replaced pole. They refused to believe that a line labeled Western Electric was theirs. Kept saying it was the electric company's line." (jackalope48; http://www.city-data.com/forum/texas/2772893-end-era.html#post48383373)
  8. 2 points
    Just found this photo and article, figured I'd leave it here. https://www.rcrwireless.com/20171109/network-infrastructure/switching-it-up-bidding-farewell-to-the-1aess-switch-tag6
  9. 2 points
    So today, I was thinking about a few people I'd talked to recently - they told me they were into the idea of scanning, but because of their lack of free time/direction, it was hard to find space in their lives for this sort of thing. So I was thinking; should I build a thing with my Dialogic box that automatically dials ranges that look potentially fun, and let people review the recordings/manually make a description of what's actually on the line? There could be a rough level of signal detection using the DSP; enough to let you search by what you'd like to see most; whether it be recordings, VMBs, modems or dialtones or whatever, and let you select by region or operating company. Maybe some more powerful signal detection could be tacked on at a later point that could recognize certain manufacturers or switch types. This would be a pretty significant undertaking, so I'd like to know if anybody is interested before I actually do this. If you don't actively scan and would like to, would this help turn the tide for you a little?
  10. 2 points
    Good thing I'm a girl.
  11. 2 points
    My understanding is the switch portion of the packet switch is called a call agent (typically -CA0 or whatever if you're looking at a CLLI). A media gateway is just something that takes analog or TDM trunks/lines or whatever and interfaces them with the call agent. Sorta like a huge ATA. What differentiates a packet switch from a circuit switch (as far as I know) is that a packet switch internally uses packetized transport, while a circuit switch uses a time slot interchange to connect traffic. Though this isn't always black and white; sometimes media gateways have time slot interchanges. I guess if you want to be all lawyerly about it, that's technically not part of the switch. Then there's the term softswitch. As far as equipment vendors are concerned, I honestly think that's just a bullshit marketing term. A softswitch, as they put it, is a switch that's based entirely in software. A lot of packet switches will consolidate some components from the design of a circuit switch into software, but they're sold as custom, proprietary blades; there's a snowball's chance in hell you're running CS-2000 or Metaswitch software on a vanilla PC. There are things like Freeswitch and Asterisk that are actually softswitches, but the line between what is and isn't called one has been blurred by marketing weasels.
  12. 2 points
    Imagine if the Internet regressed back to 24.4, 33.6, or 56K for 24 hours? Will never happen, but made the start up sound on meh Windows to a 56K modem connecting. The memories. :-)
  13. 2 points
    I was pretty active back in 2009/2010 with exploration and scanning, this is to the best of my recollection In the UK there was some widely shared numbers that in the 90s were C5 directs as well as being free to call (0800 numbers), by 2009-2010 time only two remained: Bahamas on 0800 890 135 (it had some kind of filter on and you wasn't able to seize at any point during the call) and Paraguay on 0800 890 595, outside of the capital city sometimes numbers in Paraguay would travel over C5 routes too. In addition to this pre-earthquake calls to certain parts of Haiti would travel over C5 lines when you called numbers outside of Port-au-Prince, post earthquake in 2011 they for obvious reasons no longer worked. As far as numbers I'd have to dig through my old notes which are put away goodness knows where. Cuba was a place that I was planning on scanning before I became too busy with life and dropped out, I believe they have (had?) a mixture of the latest Chinese stuff in Havana and some of the older Soviet era crossbar stuff.
  14. 2 points
    Interesting. That's one of the tandems in Houston, TX. Mind if I ask you what you dialed to reach it?
  15. 2 points
    I just googled that and guess what: https://int3.cc/products/usbcondoms haha It doesn't say in the description that it prevents your phone from frying, but logically that's the first device to fry...
  16. 2 points
    Yeah, there are USB isolators you can get from industrial suppliers that will protect your machine, too (used to prevent a catastrophic failure on a machine tool from blowing up the control system). I would probably just grab the cheapest throwaway laptop in the parts heap/thrift store/whatever and use it, if I were going to check these out. Another thing to look at is local geocaches. I've found a few on hikes that had USB drives in them.
  17. 2 points
    This might be the last time I get to hear a US West TOPS switch hassling me for money, so I thought I might record it. I didn't have a pickup coil with me at the time - still don't actually, I should probably find my way to one. But anyway, sorry about the automatic gain control. Next time I do this, I'm going to use something a little cleaner. All I had at the time was my Dialogic box, though. In case you were wondering, this switch is indeed the sort of thing you can redbox, but it typically doesn't ask you for money retroactively. It's doing this (it actually never cut me off if you're wondering; I sat there for like twenty minutes. The tops_2.wav stuff is the last thing it said) because Qwest doesn't use TOPS for operator services anymore. It's not programmed to automatically cut you off and there's no person it can call to intervene, so, well, it just lets the call go on forever. And probably raised an alarm on the console. I've never heard it myself, but the TOPS manual says it can actually get pretty aggressive; it'll call you back to try and get you to pay if you let it. I was really disappointed when it didn't. If you listen to the way it says "past", you can hear this subtle looping sound on the end of the T syllable. This is a characteristic thing the Nortel EDRAM card does - the closest we'll get to proof here that the tandem is a DMS. Funny enough, we actually do have the original files the switch is playing back; it's some form of 32k ADPCM. It's all in some sort of strange container format that nobody could ever figure out, though. If you'd like to try your luck with it though, this is the archive with all the stock EDRAM stuff. eacts0ae.bin44 has all the ACTS stuff in it: http://www71.zippyshare.com/v/1XzPMAeZ/file.html . I'll post a manual for the card at some point. The .bin44 extension implies that it's binary as per usual, but the 44 after indicates the logical record length of the file is, well, 44 bytes. tops_1.wav tops_2.wav
  18. 2 points
    Yes and no, AMPS was narrowband (+-30 kHz (15 kHz deviation)) FM when TV audio was wideband FM (~200 kHz IIRC) (mono baseband was around 20 kHz BW/10 kHz dev, then stereo difference and SAP was above that, similar to an FM radio station except the subcarrier offsets were different). The frequencies were in former TV channels 70-83 but those were reassigned for telephone and 2-way radio usage back in the mid or late 1980s. This is why many older TV sets and VCRs could monitor AMPS transmissions by playing with the fine-tuning controls when on those channels. (Somebody please feel free to correct me on those bandwidths and deviations!)
  19. 2 points
    Carriers couldn't wait to get rid of AMPS. It was a spectrum hog. They could compress a lot more GSM and CDMA calls in the same channel space. In fact, AT&T finally got rid of 2G (TDMA) in January 2017. Again, lack of market share, spectrum hog, and everyone had finally moved on to GSM or LTE. In fact, 5G (actually not really a consumer standard) is on its way soon. More signals, less need for the older crap. It was pretty amazing. In 2008 AMPS went away, in 2009 NTSC (analog) television went away. And in a few years, the current digital ATSC will go away (ATSC 1.0) because ATSC 3.0 is around the corner. And that will use even less spectrum because the FCC is giving that away to the cell companies. ATSC 3.0 uses more compression than the current ATSC 1.0 does. And don't get me started on the landline side of things. I see huge changes in the next 5 to 10 years. Ain't technology grand?
  20. 2 points
    Changes of FCC regulation, lack of market demand and general obsolescence. In 2008 when the FCC modified rules to make AMPS carriage optional, most telcos were really quick to get rid of their AMPS services. There wasn't as much money to be had in SCPC AMPS services as there is in multiplex digital services. Funny thing though, depending where you are, if you are lucky enough you can sometimes find very small private (corporate?) AMPS base stations still in place. Usually corporate internal PBX patches I think. A friend and I came across one on a Moto brick fone a couple years ago that we believe was either at Boeing (Gresham, Ore.) or Wafertech (Camas, Wash.). What you can do with it (if anything) depends how the host PBX is configured, how big the company is and how far abandoned-in-place the base is. You'd probably stand a better chance of finding one at a huge multi/national headquarters or field office than a smaller local or regional-based company.
  21. 2 points
    Thank you @tekio These are all helpful
  22. 2 points
    Yeah, if you're looking at old scan textfiles then a carrier is a modem carrier. You can identify them by their metal screeching though you should find recordings to differentiate between a fax carrier and a modem carrier signal. You could connect to them over voip, I think, using a terminal program like Term90 or HyperTerminal. Okay, okay, I don't know offhand of any modern dial-up terminal programs. Guess I should research that. Might be a ton of BBSes under my nose and me without a trusty US Robotics.
  23. 2 points
    Likely going to be my first miss. I am just so out of the scene that I really do not have much desire to go to these anymore. They are just scenes now... or I turned into a jaded old man. Possibly both.
  24. 2 points
    not sure, again probably depends on os/raid, but objectively don't see a reason why you couldn't repair a 1 in a live setting, other than sever performance degradation during the period its repairing, the read being 1/2 speed the whole time, and having to use read to fill up the other drive, which in 5 or 6 the performance would still degrade but not as much or for as long as they have the data spread among all of the drives. if you were really worried about it there is always the option of more drives, you could have some backup script or something, backup the 1 to a third drive once a week or something, and entirely unuse/power it otherwise, and then in the event of failure would just be to do the file changes from within that week and youd have a working pair again. or the obvious just a triplet used at all times, in which all 3 would have to fail to lose anything. where with 5 just 2 and you would probably lose a significant portion of the pot, depending on how the stripping is set up
  25. 2 points
    Since you can't easily do MF, why not modify the code to pulse out 2600 when you push the digit keys, like the old pre-MF step tandems used? Timing should be 66 milliseconds of 2600 Hz, followed by 34 milliseconds of silence for each pulse, with about 500 milliseconds between each digit: Digit zero would be 10 sequences of 66ms/34ms 2600, with a 500ms pause before the next digit, for example. You still need to define a key to play 2600 for about 1.5 seconds for trunk seizure. You could also write the code to accept a number, then outpulse the entire number with the correct timings. There is a number on CNET that this can be used to dial with. This is essentially the method used by Cap'n Crunch and Joe Engressia to phreak step tandems or switches that accepted older SF trunks from step tandems. Routes that used this method of tone signalling were already pretty rare back in the late 60's and early 70s when they used this technique. You had to discover a number that routed through a step tandem from your dialing location, usually by trial and error. Vancouver, BC in Canada had one such switch. D.
  26. 2 points
    800-877-3542 - Older IVR of some kind. JCSwishMan33 and Ramsaso helped narrow down that it belongs to some large gas company. Listen to those crunchy recordings! Oh, also there's hidden options. The golden rule seems to be * goes back, and #/0 will hang up.
  27. 2 points
    If you want to get the absolute lowest price for telephone service, you want "metered service" or "message rate service". This is not offered in all areas, and it might not be what you really want. In my area, it cannot be ordered (and is not offered) online, it must be ordered over the phone, and it comes out to about $14 after taxes. Essentially, that price only gives you a dial tone, and you are charged for every local call you make. Think of it like a pay phone. In my area, most local calls are also timed on message rate service, so you don't pay per-call, you pay for the amount of time you talk in 3 or 5 minute increments. If you make a lot of calls, the cost can get out of hand quickly. However, if you only make a few calls per month, or call lots of numbers that don't answer, it might be a good option. Metered service is sometimes available with or without an allowance. In my area, the service without an allowance is cheapest, but if you pay $3 extra, you get an allowence of about $5. It can save you money if you make more than $3 of calls. It makes sense if you want a line primarily to receive calls, but you really need to do the math to make sure it's a good option for placing lots of calls. Just to repeat, phone pricing is controlled by each state and as a result, pricing is not consistent nationwide. In my state, prices vary city-to-city, so the only way to find out what's available is to call the phone company and ask them. In PA, they are legally obligated to tell you all of your options starting with the lowest, but they tend to do so only if you say something like "please tell me the pricing options for telephone service starting with the cheapest". If money isn't an object, just get the bundle!
  28. 2 points
    I'd heard of things like that happening, both with new flash drives and with those purchased secondhand (mostly eBay stories). Mine are usually immediately reformatted with a UDF filesystem anyway.
  29. 1 point
    Anybody caught spamming for "dumps", "fullz", credit card lists, phone number lists, pay proxies, password lists or anything of that sort, for free or for profit, will meet their creator in /dev/null if they are found anywhere on this site! Such sercvices are not only 100% illegal but they have absolutely nothing to do with hacking. This site is not the place to be advertising for-profit illicit services. If you post these you can expect to have your ass permabanned. I really hope we're clear on this. Note that this warning does NOT extend to the legitimate research exchange scans/"jans" posted in Old Skool Phreaking. Here is an example of the type of material that will get you in deep shit if you post it here (typos left unedited, for perspective): And if one does get through and they have provided contact information, and I haven't removed the post yet, I encourage everybody able to do so to mailbomb them in the mean time with "hi, hello, how r u, dude, man etc etc etc". Why not, they're wasting our time and disk space, it's your duty to waste theirs. Turnabout is fair play.
  30. 1 point
    Hello Are there any countries, which still use CCITT 5? Sorry for my bad English
  31. 1 point
    From what I understand, Genband really, really doesn't like to do this, and will whine and drag their feet the whole way if you want to plug a C20 into old cards. As for the lifespan of the 5E/DMS/other TDM switches, the engineers running these things seem like they're ready to keep them in good condition for a long time, and big telcos freeze like deers in headlights whenever you ask them to invest money in anything. The real question is probably more regulatory than anything else; will the current crop of regulatory actors tell the local exchange carriers that they can walk away from their customers? And more importantly, will they be able to make that stick? I try not to dabble in politics too much here, but local exchange service would be caught up in the same legal battle as regulated trunking for CLECs, wholesale providers and other types. The lawyers from public interest groups, carriers with a lot of CLEC interests, etcetera would more than likely pile on quite fast. And this would be in addition to the cases accumulating from the net neutrality stuff. I think the economic incentive for that was a lot stronger because even ten years ago, there were only ~40 1AESSes, including three that belonged to Verizon. And that particularly project took them six years to complete. Phasing out the 1As probably gave AT&T legroom to stop paying Nokia for 1AESS support, let go of their specialized 1A staff (which is relative, I guess; I understand very few actually knew how they worked), and gave them the flexibility to not have to keep special practices ready for non-digital offices. Considering the much more readily available amount of knowledge, relative similarities between packet and digital circuit switches and sheer number of switches, it'd probably be of pretty limited financial - and certainly service benefits to start phasing circuit switched end offices out. If you want to save money on running a central office, there's probably much better ways to invest, like in solar power to offset the cost of powering everyone's phone line.
  32. 1 point
    Anyone Still using this ??? Is it still Up ???
  33. 1 point
    What do you mean? and is Opencache an alternative to Geocache for North Muricans?
  34. 1 point
    If I have time before I leave on yet another business trip, I'll contact a friend of mine at iConetiv (the successor to Bellcore, Telcordia, etc. etc.) to see what 1As are still around. Sad when Lafayette Main goes away since that's where my friend Mark Cuccia lived. He was the one who always tracked the last 1AESS switches in the US. Sadly he passed away in 2014. That's why I'm keeping this thread alive in his memory. (TP knows who he is too.)
  35. 1 point
    I was digging through some ThoughtPhreaker numbers from back in 2012/2013 when I came across this entry: 503-654-9900 - Synthesized voice, "AM transmitter. Please enter access code" .... Now there is a little something "extra" at the end of the message...... I wonder if someone figured out the access code?? Hahaha AWW I see someone already discovered this in 2014
  36. 1 point
    TV Stereo used a different pilot for the L-R signal. Otherwise it was almost identical to FM Stereo. Yup, the 800 MHz band we know and love for cellular (the infamous "A" and "B" bands) were the old UHF channels 70 to 83. With the advent of ATSC (now known retroactively as ATSC 1.0), channels 52 to 69 were removed in 2009 and those are now known as the 700 MHz LTE band. With the upcoming ATSC 3.0 that's around the corner, UHF channels above 37 will be removed. That will become more bandwidth, probably for 5G wireless. In addition, TV stations are volunteering turning in their licenses, which will free up even more spectrum. With ATSC 3.0, the 6 MHz channels will handle up to 4K video and you can compress the living snot out of 1080, 720 and 480 (tons of sub-channels). So the now pretty much empty UHF band will shrink once again and will be littered with wireless. Yup, CED killed RCA. Sadly. Had they foreseen that lasers would come into play, they could have taken the market away from Sony and Philips. But that's another topic! As for upper cable bands - many people didn't realize that they co-existed with existing OTA stuff. Cable channels 14-22 were the infamous Air/Police band (and ITMS mobile phones back in the day!), and upper cable channels were mapped to UHF channels. Back in the 80s, I had an upconverter that converted cable channels 14-36 to upper UHF. Wonder if it can be repurposed in this day and age?
  37. 1 point
    Walking through Office with dick in hand.. We call Willy C. Trailer Park Man... Peeks in a stall? What did he see? Monica and Gennifer trying to take a pee...... Media started to talk, each intern described the same cock... The Clintons' career got impeached from the Pennsylvania block.... :-P Early 80's something: Old Mother Hubbard went to the cupboard to give her poor dog a bone. When Mother bent over, Rover took over and her a bone of his own. 1st Grade Reading Class: "Say <person's sister's name> may I", then spell cup. Most I will not post in respect to current racial tensions in the USA.
  38. 1 point
    That would be awesome if they can do it! Keep us posted.
  39. 1 point
    How come when the NSA does it, it's cyber intelligence and not Facebook Stalking?
  40. 1 point
    40 is the new 21, right? Then how come it feels like 100?
  41. 1 point
    Since getting the HP 420 squared away with a proper mirrored ZFS volume, I've been working on getting to the point where I can shut down my old workstation, which was still limping along running a few applications, like my Dynamic DNS widget. I needed somewhere to run things like the Dynamic DNS system, and leave a tmux running for persistent IRC. I don't have a server rack up yet, so my old VM hosting box is currently offline. It's really too loud to run out in the main workshop area (you can hear it upstairs, the workshop is in the basement). Until then, I dug into the junk bin and put together a server: The case is a massive Lian Li aluminum ATX server case. I picked it up at a local tech surplus auction for, I think $10, with a power supply and a DVD drive. It looks kinda silly with so little hardware in it: The motherboard is an Intel Desktop Board DP43TF from a machine I built in probably 2009 and dismantled in 2010 or 2011 -- it developed a RAM error and I stole the Xeon CPU out of it to use in something else. The CPU is an Intel Core 2 Duo E4300, 1.8 GHz LGA775, 2 MB cache, that came from a computer we found in the trash that had exploded motherboard caps, but a good CPU and RAM. Power supply came from a friend's junk PC that I was given when he replaced it. There's no onboard video on the DP43TF so I've got a GeForce 8800GT stuck in there for the console at the moment 8 GB DDR2 came from another junk PC someone gave me. DVD drive and WD RE4 250 GB drive were on the spare parts shelf. I updated the BIOS to the 2011 release (was the original 2008 release) which is supposed to improve stability. It's currently running OpenBSD 6.0 AMD64, with various applications deployed to it with Capistrano (manages your deploys over plain SSH). Telephoney is going to send me a less power hungry PCIe card with VGA so I can get the GeForce 8800 out of there! I've though about finding another Xeon X3360 (quad core, 12 MB cache) for the board -- that's what I originally ran in it, and it's the fastest thing it will support, but it doesn't really seem worthwhile since this box is pretty old and should be temporary anyway.
  42. 1 point
    well the zen is pretty similar to intel design, where bulldozer(and children) were totally different like.. a david core, to the intel being the goliath core. where the zen core is functionally about 1.5 of the integer cores and the entire fpu but bit beefed up/changed of the bulldozer module also with some kind of cheap smt where. its going to be much faster single threaded and on the back end still have good performance through the higher utilization by switching in the other queued work any time theres a stall/fetch whatever where the bulldozer was only good if you loaded every thread/everything to the max where it would use all the units, so any kind of mixed workload where it went single threaded intel would pull ahead with say the 3770k vs the 8350, but in specifically highly parallel workloads like transcoding, ray tracing, encryption/decryption file compression/decompression then the amd throws down sort of between the regular intel core or like phenom/athlon2, and xeonphi kind of a weird compromise
  43. 1 point
    This thread is just itching for a KXPD joke .
  44. 1 point
    Hey guys I'm pretty new to phones and scanning and found this weird thing and was wondering if any of you guys happen to know what this thing is: 601-748-4225 enter 5555# - it seems to be some kind of monitor with weird conversations.   Any idea?   --heartbreakr
  45. 1 point
    She still pops up every so often! You're right though, especially with a lot of time/temperature numbers being updated or disconnected, that's becoming kind of a hard voice to find. Here's a few places I've seen here; 503-266-8463 - Whatever kind of time announcement this is, I've seen another company use this. I don't remember where, though :S 215-979-0040 - DMS in Philly 202-986-9967 - You'll have to help me out with this one. I think this might be early Pat Fleet, but that Jane Barbe inflection really sticks out. I haven't been to DC in a while, but the last time I was there, all the 5ESSes had that announcement.
  46. 1 point
    Hi everyone. Just thought I would share something with you guys. A couple of months ago I bought a wireless webcam online and finally got around to opening the box and reading the instructions a few weeks ago and I come across this: http://vindyimages.co.nf/webcam.html Click on the link to see an image I scanned of the page in the instruction booklet that got my attention (I had to make the image large to see all the text and it's too big to post directly on the forum). Take a close look at the list to the left with an example showing how to select your wifi router. The second router on the list is named "You_Little_Fucker". I'm guessing what happened is whoever did the instructions forgot he had a rather inappropriately named router there and a lot of instructions were printed before they noticed the bad language, and decided not to pay the money it would take to print off new instructions. This is a popular product being sold on sites like Amazon and eBay. I googled it to see if anyone else has noticed the same thing and posted something about it online and came up with nothing. Maybe the mistake was corrected at some point and I just happened to buy one of the ones that made it all the way to market with the curse word. I don't know, but needless to say it made me laugh.
  47. 1 point
    Why not make it responsive? It generally leads to better code structure and easier to achieve HTML compliant code as well as the benefit of it being responsive which would totally solve your mobile version issue. Also have a look at ImageOptim for reducing filesize of your images.
  48. 1 point
    Congratulations! Two more to go!
  49. 1 point
    Thanks verbie. Were they all already reserved? What about rooms 106-115, are any of them available? i suppose i could dig up something to talk about and wouldn't mind pitching in
  50. 1 point
    If Emmanuel Goldstein were as mercenary as that link claims, I don't think he would have such a liberal policy on reprinting 2600 content and copying the Freedom Downtime DVD. Nor would he offer recordings of the HOPE conference sessions for free download. The registration fee for HOPE would probably be higher, too, judging by what most similar conferences of that size charge.