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  1. 6 points
    Here's the complete collection of recordings I grabbed of the Odessa 1AESS switch before the cutover. The recordings were made during late may, with the last batch (A-D recordings) made on June 2, 2017 -- days before the cutover. The most interesting recordings I found during the calls to the switch: 1AESS-A.wav - Highest quality recording/best example I have of what a normal call to the 1AESS intercept sounded like. Allows you to hear the background SIT-tone noise before recordings. 1AESS-D.wav - Highest quality recording/best example I have of what a normal call to the 1AESS supervision test sounded like. 1AESS-3.wav - Bizarre because the switch cut to busy after intercept, instead of cutting over to reorder like normal. 1AESS-11.wav - Bizarre because the call, without ring, goes to the 1AESS intercept recording for one cycle, then stops for 20 seconds, and returns the Hillsboro 4ESS '121-T!' recording. 1AESS-14.wav - Bizarre because the call, rings once, goes silent for 30 seconds, then returns the Hillsboro 4ESS '121-T!' recording. 1AESS-15.wav - Bizarre because the call, rings once, goes silent for 40 seconds, then returns a reorder. More descriptions on the other calls are available on the 1A_desc.txt file on the dropbox drive. https://www.dropbox.com/sh/xca3wwskn1mzwzt/AABJMpTS0XDL9NQQgiz4LVI4a?dl=0 Enjoy.
  2. 4 points
    There's another number to that; 3438. If you're hitting a route that gives you g.729 (sorta ruins that catchy song), it's not a bad idea to try both a few times. Interestingly, the transcoding seems to come on after the C5 chirps; those (and sometimes some Australian sounding ring) are always clear as day. So now when I found this - I actually think I found it with radio_phreak, but when I did, I was about as excited as you can expect. But something wasn't quite right. If you do a RESPORG lookup on 3438/7, it comes back as using the MCI/0222 network. If you call the number directly terminating to the Malaysian destination (you'll find it with a bit of searching) over MCI though, it's end to end SS7. After trying a bunch of carriers with no success, the theory we wound up with is that they were re-originating via a third party country; likely Australia, to shave a few cents off termination charges. Interestingly, when you hop on a conference on that access number, it'll allow you the option to contact customer service for the company, which is based out of Denver. The route you get is _definitely_ not C5. For whatever it's worth, there was another number until semi-recently; 3439 that routed a little differently. Usually it was more likely to get a transcoded route, or other weird things - one route had 450 hertz ringback before the call went offhook quite a lot . But anyway, for whatever it's worth, during Hurricane Sandy it gave you an error recording from a Santera OCX. If I remember right, the other numbers worked fine though. One thing I've noticed is during that song they play for hold music, sometimes it likes to disconnect you in weird ways. The hold music in question passes some notes a few times that definitely sound like 2400 hertz, so I wonder if that has anything to do with it (maybe we should pay attention to the supervision status), or if it's just an apathetic operator hanging up on you. Incidentally, when the call tears down with 2600, you'll hear this curious reorder tone from the international gateway that sorta fades in and out. Based on this, I wonder if it's a type 1 EWSD: https://pastebin.com/q1dvEcVw . So this isn't exactly C5, but a while ago, I found some Axtel DMS logs on Scribd. No, seriously. You can see from there they have quite a few R2 trunks provisioned for end users: 142785363-switch-a.pdf . We were playing with this on the bridge a few months ago - something I sorta want to get into again at some point; a few people seemed pretty excited about it. There's one particular number, +52-818-114-1500 (on the AX2P42 trunk group; labeled STA_CATARINA_CALL_CENTER_PBX_R2. If you look at page 224, you'll see the trunk group type configuration for this and many others; there's a bunch of R2 trunks with generic labels) that will send a backwards 4 in MFC (780 + 1140 hertz)to the switch - indicating a network error when it messes up. Which it occasionally does. Dunno how or if these can be seized, but it seemed worth mentioning. Speaking of which, I don't have the number for this; I had the bright idea of putting it on the speed dial for a calling card and then letting it expire, but Russia has some sort of strange signaling - perhaps another R2 variant floating about in their network. This particular call I remember being to Siberia: weirdmfs.flac . A lot of their switches use whatever this is. It enables them to send vacant number conditions and such over their signaling network. All I do here besides try and hit some DTMF is whistle 2600 twice; once to seize the trunk, and another time to make the switch get all angry. The tones you hear are the standard R1 frequency set, but obviously an R1 trunk never barks MFs back at you. EDIT: Crap, I forgot about the Cuba stuff. From what I understand, Havana if no other place has a reasonably modern network of Alcatel gear. As for the fixed GSM terminals, there's some older documents on Cuban telecom infrastructure lying around. All of them seem to point towards the Cuban fixed network being very over capacity. That could have something to do with that particular addition. As for Paraguay, radio_phreak mentioned to me a while back a particular set of numbers that would route to C5 trunks over some carriers. I believe it was +595-528-222-xxx. Back to the C5 stuff though, does anybody know where we can find a protocol spec document for it? That'll probably help us with some of the oddities we've found on some of these trunk groups. Another EDIT: http://www.itu.int/rec/T-REC-Q.140-Q.180/en Holy shit, another EDIT: http://www.binrev.com/forums/index.php?/topic/47028-portugal/#comment-364799 portugal_c5.flac One (hopefully) last thing - for anybody looking for international credit, I've found http://www.call2.com to be pretty good for the most part. Most of their routes look to be resold MCI, the rates are reasonable, and it tends to be decent quality. It is a callback service though, so it can be a little clunky for a large number of calls like in a scan. DMS-10 loops can be a good way to make this a little less painful. I feel kinda gross giving out a plug like that, but given the relative obscurity of the service and the content of the thread, it seems appropriate.
  3. 4 points
    0800 890 595 is now a (quite rare) example of the equipment engaged tone. I haven't done much looking for interesting switching/signalling since the early 2000s. It's got more difficult now because most people and businesses in poor countries have jumped straight to GSM (+successors). Back then, it would (as radio_phreak notes) be much more productive to look in the provincial towns and cities of poor countries than in their main cities. My preferred method was to look online for hotels or businesses in those backwater areas, ideally finding their fax numbers, and call those. Much prefer bothering a fax machine than disturbing a person. Now-a-days you need to do this armed with the country's dialling plan (wikipedia usually has these) - and most of the numbers you find will be mobiles. Re Cuba, I can't reach the supposed second dialtone for the US base via +53 99. The state telco is marketing the "fija alternativa" service - ie a GSM-based fixed service - suggesting aged and interesting POTS equipment exists. Calling from here, it's evident that their international gateway is something not outrageously ancient, because it promptly returns an appropriate SS7 code for incorrect prefixes - eg +53 41 000000 returns the usual SIT+"the number you have dialled has not been recognised" from my local exchange. +53 xx 300000 returns a Cuban intercept - in Spanish then English - after about 5 seconds of delay, where XX is any of the 2-digit areacodes listed at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telephone_numbers_in_Cuba. Sadly no signalling sounds are evident during the delays - I think I've tried all of them. I had a quick look for hotels in Panama and all the phone numbers I found were +507 6xxx xxxxx - ie mobiles. However, again, I'm hopeful that downstream of the international gateway is something elderly and interesting. +507 900 0000 sometimes gives an intercept - Spanish only - mentioning C&W Panama, again with a significant post-dial delay. +507 800 0000 gives my local telco's equipment engaged tone. +507 811 1111 was answered by a human +507 700 0000 is a different Spanish intercept, with a longer post-dial delay. +507 600 0000 or 500 0000 give my local telco's SIT+number not recognised intercept. +507 400 0000 is the same intercept-after-delay as 900 0000. +507 300 0000 is yet another Spanish intercept, with delay. +507 200 0000 has a very long delay then something times out any my local telco plays SIT+"sorry, there is a fault". +507 210 0000 has a long delay then the 900 0000 intercept +507 220 0000 rings, again after a delay, and is answered by some sort of automated service - in Spanish. No signalling sounds or evident, for me, in any of the above :-(
  4. 3 points
    Long time lurker.... registered recently..... first post... I know this thread is a bit old, figured I could be of some assistance here: Auto-scanned the 630713XXXX exchange (Took about ~15 hours), then did some manual checking: Number Auto-Scan Result Manual Scan, Comments 6307130025 VOICE Voicemail 6307130027 VOICE Subscriber 6307130107 VOICE Voicemail 6307130138 VOICE Voicemail (Nokia) 6307130460 VOICE UMTS Operations Support Group (Nokia -- "Please try again in 15 minutes") 6307130484 VOICE "We're sorry, but the blackout period for the transtition of the 401k record keeper is in effect on January 6th, please call back on January 7th." Repeats, then hangs up. 6307130563 VOICE Subscriber 6307130760 VOICE "Thank you for calling the Nokia workplace resources call center." 6307130869 VOICE Voicemail 6307130990 VOICE Voicemail Access Number, with working directory. 6307130996 VOICE Voicemail Access Number, with working directory. 6307131006 VOICE Subscriber 6307131229 VOICE Subscriber 6307131265 VOICE "Sorry, this automated attendant number is not available at the moment, goodbye." 6307131292 VOICE Subscriber 6307131304 VOICE "The called extension is busy" >> Voicemail 6307131329 VOICE Subscriber 6307131335 VOICE Ring >> Reorder 6307131553 VOICE Voicemail 6307131984 FAX Fax tones 6307132349 FAX Fax tones 6307133200 VOICE Voicemail Access Number, with working directory. 6307133678 FAX Possibly a modem. 6307134150 VOICE Subscriber 6307134389 VOICE Subscriber 6307134433 VOICE Voicemail 6307134484 VOICE Subscriber 6307134633 VOICE Voicemail 6307134967 VOICE Voicemail 6307135012 VOICE Voicemail 6307135163 VOICE Voicemail (reads back extension number) 6307135305 FAX Possibly a modem. 6307135353 VOICE Voicemail 6307135400 VOICE Voicemail 6307136056 FAX Fax tones 6307136081 FAX Fax tones 6307136082 FAX Fax tones 6307136091 VOICE Possibly an elevator?? Buzzing/Static on line. Hangs up with #. 6307136153 VOICE Another elevator phone? Hangs up with # again. 6307137073 VOICE Subscriber 6307137163 VOICE Voicemail 6307137180 VOICE Voicemail 6307137339 VOICE Subscriber 6307138416 VOICE Subscriber 6307138507 VOICE Voicemail 6307138668 VOICE Voicemail 6307138761 VOICE Voicemail 6307139039 VOICE Voicemail 6307139328 VOICE Voicemail 6307139379 VOICE Subscriber 6307139650 VOICE Voicemail 6307139764 VOICE Voicemail 6307139885 VOICE Subscriber 6307139988 VOICE Voicemail If there's any interest I can run a scan on 630979XXXX.
  5. 3 points
    This is just a beginning to get people started. Feel free to add onto more if you wish. The 'Threads' links you will see are from threads from these forums where the topic has been discussed before. I wrote this a few months ago so there may even be more threads about them if you search around. This list was made from numerous threads about the same topics; to stop the bitching from the Department of Redundancy Department. 1. How do I use exploits? ::Discussions - 1. ::Programs for assistance - Nmap and Nessus. ::Reference material - Security Focus, and Irongeek. 2. How do I get the admin password for Windows XP? ::Discussions - 1. ::Programs for assistance - Login recovery, and John the Ripper. ::Reference material - Password Recovery, Irongeek.com, and many others. I would suggest reading the discussion thread. 3. How do I hack a website? ::Discussions - 1 , 2, 3. 4. How do I get around web filtering like Websense? ::Discussions - 1, 2, 3. ::Programs for assistance - It is probally easier to use a proxy to get around web filtering software. ::Reference material - Babelfish, Proxy Blind, and Proxify. 5. What are proxies and how do they work? ::Discussions - 1, 2. ::Programs for assistance - There are tons of proxy server lists out there. Suggest doing a Google search for "Proxy", "Proxies", "Proxy Server", etc. ::Reference material - Wiki Proxy Info. 6. Where can I find more Hacker media like HackTV or BRR? For general Hacker Media information check out the Forums. ::Reference material - Hackermedia, Infonomicon, Old Skool Phreak, WhiteSword TV, Packet Sniffers, Hak5. 7. What are some good books to read that will teach me about hacking? This all depends on what you are interested in learning. ::Reference material - Cryptography, Programming, Networking, and Social Engineering. 8. Where can I find a meeting to attend, and what if no one is in my area? If no one is in your area then start up your own meeting, and let others know about it! ::Reference material - Bin Rev meetings - BRR listeners map, DefCon groups, 2600 meetings, and also search for a LUG (Linux User Group) in your area. 9. What Linux distro is the best? ::Discussions - 1. ::Reference material - Rundown on different distros, a test that may help you decide which is best for you, and you may also want to check out more distros' for yourself. 10. How do I learn how to hack? ::Discussions - 1, 2. 11. I want to program, where should I start? ::Discussions - 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22. C Book, Tutorial, Windows Compiler, *nix Compiler, *nix Compiler How-To. Python Website, Book, Tutorial, Compiler, Compiler How-To.
  6. 2 points
    Some recordings came to me from a source that I trust of phone calls from Russia and around the Baltic area in general, taken 2 or so months ago and in a few of the recordings you'll sometimes hear tones before people answer the phone. I'll put a compilation together soon-ish and upload here for people to hear. The audio can be tinny in places, nothing I can do about that unfortunately.
  7. 2 points
    If you dial extension 8411-8414 it will make the automated voice say "Lane ""1-4"" Most pharmacies dont have more than two lanes. So if youre there waiting for a script, dial ext 8413 to hear the voice on the loudspeaker say "lane 3" and watch the employees confusion. its hilarious.
  8. 2 points
    904-266-9604 - Nortel key system owned by MCI/Verizon; Mister Rogers works here. +800-6669-5588 - China Telecom NIS rec, mildly weird stuff happens afterwards 416-591-0105 - One of many numbers that goes to a Octel VMS owned by Bell Canada, tells you you don't have access to the advanced intelligent network 800-483-0015 - Verizon office with Rolm PBX 603-746-0125 - Weird thingie on analog line, picks up with square wave beep 603-746-9911 - IVR, "Thank you for calling. Enter your user ID and press pound to continue." 480-792-3996 - PCAnywhere modem on Nortel PBX 307-782-9997 - "The number you have dialed is not authorized to receive incoming calls." <Nortel EDRAM digits> "085501" 307-782-0000 - <480 hertz beep in background> "Union Telephone operator, how can I help you?" - TOPS position, will dial local numbers for you. 360-985-1902 - Weird sounding dialtone
  9. 2 points
    "I spent three hours last year convincing the AT&T call center that they needed to get their line back on a replaced pole. They refused to believe that a line labeled Western Electric was theirs. Kept saying it was the electric company's line." (jackalope48; http://www.city-data.com/forum/texas/2772893-end-era.html#post48383373)
  10. 2 points
    I picked this up in a heap of old computer, radio, and telephone equipment, from a guy who had been an engineer in the Navy, then an engineer/lineman/programmer at Bell Labs in NJ: It's an *actual* milliwatt! I can't find the BSP for it online, but I did find a hardcopy on eBay, so I'll scan that in when I get it. Battery test points, this is the battery (well, the top of an old one): 45V "B batteries" were common in old radios and other higher-than-we're-used-to voltages were common in other types of test gear. For instance, a kick meter uses a different 45V battery (looks like a giant 9V and is still made). Top of the internal circuit subassembly, the battery goes in the space seen at the top of the picture: Here's the circuit: Typical Western Electric, potted networks, switchboard jacks, and expensive resistors and capacitors. Not yet sure if the pot varies pitch or level. You can see there's a single very old GE transistor in a metal can package clipped to the side of the uppermost (4002A) network, presumably the only active component in the circuit.
  11. 2 points
    Just found this photo and article, figured I'd leave it here. https://www.rcrwireless.com/20171109/network-infrastructure/switching-it-up-bidding-farewell-to-the-1aess-switch-tag6
  12. 2 points
    I go all over the US for work and vacation, and when I do I like to see how the local network homes on various tandems (AT&T, MCI, Sprint) when I can. I like to do it from landlines and cellphones since both route differently. I also do this with VOIP carriers since often times they dump you on the POTS network at various places, and this can either be static or dynamic. (Can you say Tandem round robin?) Often times calls from landline, cellular or VOIP go to the newer "edge switches" that are in the format of NPA-xL (like 412-9L). I believe most of these are 5ESS based. But most of the time you can reach a 4ESS in the format of xxx-T. Anyhow, I was in a very rural place in Wyoming in May while on vacation. It was a rest stop in the middle of nowhere. The rest stop used to have a pay phone (you can tell it was there and removed), but they did have a microcell for Verizon Wireless (obviously fed by DSL). Doing my test for AT&T, it did the round robin as I suspected (some sort of VOIP backhaul) and I came up on 088-T a few times. That *used* to be the AT&T tandem for San Diego. They retired the 4ESS a few years ago, but now it comes up in the "new" voice that AT&T is using for the new generation "N4E" system.The N4E uses the old 4ESS software hosted in a virtual environment in newer hardware (lot smaller footprint and more in tune with modern packet switching). Sure enough, I was in San Diego last week and tried it from a COCOT. Yup, they do have a new N4E and has the new voice on the trailer. So I'm wondering how many of the existing 4ESS systems will be replaced by N4E systems? I also wonder how many 4ESS and N4E systems are out there. I found a N4E in Scottsdale, AZ (NPA 480) not too long ago. Haven't explored what else is new out there recently.
  13. 2 points
    So today, I was thinking about a few people I'd talked to recently - they told me they were into the idea of scanning, but because of their lack of free time/direction, it was hard to find space in their lives for this sort of thing. So I was thinking; should I build a thing with my Dialogic box that automatically dials ranges that look potentially fun, and let people review the recordings/manually make a description of what's actually on the line? There could be a rough level of signal detection using the DSP; enough to let you search by what you'd like to see most; whether it be recordings, VMBs, modems or dialtones or whatever, and let you select by region or operating company. Maybe some more powerful signal detection could be tacked on at a later point that could recognize certain manufacturers or switch types. This would be a pretty significant undertaking, so I'd like to know if anybody is interested before I actually do this. If you don't actively scan and would like to, would this help turn the tide for you a little?
  14. 2 points
  15. 2 points
    My understanding is the switch portion of the packet switch is called a call agent (typically -CA0 or whatever if you're looking at a CLLI). A media gateway is just something that takes analog or TDM trunks/lines or whatever and interfaces them with the call agent. Sorta like a huge ATA. What differentiates a packet switch from a circuit switch (as far as I know) is that a packet switch internally uses packetized transport, while a circuit switch uses a time slot interchange to connect traffic. Though this isn't always black and white; sometimes media gateways have time slot interchanges. I guess if you want to be all lawyerly about it, that's technically not part of the switch. Then there's the term softswitch. As far as equipment vendors are concerned, I honestly think that's just a bullshit marketing term. A softswitch, as they put it, is a switch that's based entirely in software. A lot of packet switches will consolidate some components from the design of a circuit switch into software, but they're sold as custom, proprietary blades; there's a snowball's chance in hell you're running CS-2000 or Metaswitch software on a vanilla PC. There are things like Freeswitch and Asterisk that are actually softswitches, but the line between what is and isn't called one has been blurred by marketing weasels.
  16. 2 points
    Imagine if the Internet regressed back to 24.4, 33.6, or 56K for 24 hours? Will never happen, but made the start up sound on meh Windows to a 56K modem connecting. The memories. :-)
  17. 2 points
    I was pretty active back in 2009/2010 with exploration and scanning, this is to the best of my recollection In the UK there was some widely shared numbers that in the 90s were C5 directs as well as being free to call (0800 numbers), by 2009-2010 time only two remained: Bahamas on 0800 890 135 (it had some kind of filter on and you wasn't able to seize at any point during the call) and Paraguay on 0800 890 595, outside of the capital city sometimes numbers in Paraguay would travel over C5 routes too. In addition to this pre-earthquake calls to certain parts of Haiti would travel over C5 lines when you called numbers outside of Port-au-Prince, post earthquake in 2011 they for obvious reasons no longer worked. As far as numbers I'd have to dig through my old notes which are put away goodness knows where. Cuba was a place that I was planning on scanning before I became too busy with life and dropped out, I believe they have (had?) a mixture of the latest Chinese stuff in Havana and some of the older Soviet era crossbar stuff.
  18. 2 points
    Interesting. That's one of the tandems in Houston, TX. Mind if I ask you what you dialed to reach it?
  19. 2 points
    I just googled that and guess what: https://int3.cc/products/usbcondoms haha It doesn't say in the description that it prevents your phone from frying, but logically that's the first device to fry...
  20. 2 points
    Yeah, there are USB isolators you can get from industrial suppliers that will protect your machine, too (used to prevent a catastrophic failure on a machine tool from blowing up the control system). I would probably just grab the cheapest throwaway laptop in the parts heap/thrift store/whatever and use it, if I were going to check these out. Another thing to look at is local geocaches. I've found a few on hikes that had USB drives in them.
  21. 2 points
    I still use flash drives to take stuff to untrusted computers -- for example, when I take something to the print shop to be run off in large format. These types of places (print/copy shops, library, et c.) don't run a primary business of having safe, secure computers, and they let you plug in and run pretty much anything, so I will typically use a flash drive to take files, then nuke it when I get home. I don't log into anything on those computers, I've seen people at the print shop logged in with their cloud storage, email, whatever. Seems like a great way to get keylogged or your session cookie swiped or something. For moving stuff around between computers I trust, yeah, I don't really use flash drives anymore. Ironically I do still use floppies -- but that's only because part of my business is legacy systems repair/maintenance.
  22. 2 points
    This might be the last time I get to hear a US West TOPS switch hassling me for money, so I thought I might record it. I didn't have a pickup coil with me at the time - still don't actually, I should probably find my way to one. But anyway, sorry about the automatic gain control. Next time I do this, I'm going to use something a little cleaner. All I had at the time was my Dialogic box, though. In case you were wondering, this switch is indeed the sort of thing you can redbox, but it typically doesn't ask you for money retroactively. It's doing this (it actually never cut me off if you're wondering; I sat there for like twenty minutes. The tops_2.wav stuff is the last thing it said) because Qwest doesn't use TOPS for operator services anymore. It's not programmed to automatically cut you off and there's no person it can call to intervene, so, well, it just lets the call go on forever. And probably raised an alarm on the console. I've never heard it myself, but the TOPS manual says it can actually get pretty aggressive; it'll call you back to try and get you to pay if you let it. I was really disappointed when it didn't. If you listen to the way it says "past", you can hear this subtle looping sound on the end of the T syllable. This is a characteristic thing the Nortel EDRAM card does - the closest we'll get to proof here that the tandem is a DMS. Funny enough, we actually do have the original files the switch is playing back; it's some form of 32k ADPCM. It's all in some sort of strange container format that nobody could ever figure out, though. If you'd like to try your luck with it though, this is the archive with all the stock EDRAM stuff. eacts0ae.bin44 has all the ACTS stuff in it: http://www71.zippyshare.com/v/1XzPMAeZ/file.html . I'll post a manual for the card at some point. The .bin44 extension implies that it's binary as per usual, but the 44 after indicates the logical record length of the file is, well, 44 bytes. tops_1.wav tops_2.wav
  23. 2 points
    Yes and no, AMPS was narrowband (+-30 kHz (15 kHz deviation)) FM when TV audio was wideband FM (~200 kHz IIRC) (mono baseband was around 20 kHz BW/10 kHz dev, then stereo difference and SAP was above that, similar to an FM radio station except the subcarrier offsets were different). The frequencies were in former TV channels 70-83 but those were reassigned for telephone and 2-way radio usage back in the mid or late 1980s. This is why many older TV sets and VCRs could monitor AMPS transmissions by playing with the fine-tuning controls when on those channels. (Somebody please feel free to correct me on those bandwidths and deviations!)
  24. 2 points
    Carriers couldn't wait to get rid of AMPS. It was a spectrum hog. They could compress a lot more GSM and CDMA calls in the same channel space. In fact, AT&T finally got rid of 2G (TDMA) in January 2017. Again, lack of market share, spectrum hog, and everyone had finally moved on to GSM or LTE. In fact, 5G (actually not really a consumer standard) is on its way soon. More signals, less need for the older crap. It was pretty amazing. In 2008 AMPS went away, in 2009 NTSC (analog) television went away. And in a few years, the current digital ATSC will go away (ATSC 1.0) because ATSC 3.0 is around the corner. And that will use even less spectrum because the FCC is giving that away to the cell companies. ATSC 3.0 uses more compression than the current ATSC 1.0 does. And don't get me started on the landline side of things. I see huge changes in the next 5 to 10 years. Ain't technology grand?
  25. 2 points
    Changes of FCC regulation, lack of market demand and general obsolescence. In 2008 when the FCC modified rules to make AMPS carriage optional, most telcos were really quick to get rid of their AMPS services. There wasn't as much money to be had in SCPC AMPS services as there is in multiplex digital services. Funny thing though, depending where you are, if you are lucky enough you can sometimes find very small private (corporate?) AMPS base stations still in place. Usually corporate internal PBX patches I think. A friend and I came across one on a Moto brick fone a couple years ago that we believe was either at Boeing (Gresham, Ore.) or Wafertech (Camas, Wash.). What you can do with it (if anything) depends how the host PBX is configured, how big the company is and how far abandoned-in-place the base is. You'd probably stand a better chance of finding one at a huge multi/national headquarters or field office than a smaller local or regional-based company.
  26. 2 points
    Thank you @tekio These are all helpful
  27. 2 points
    Yeah, if you're looking at old scan textfiles then a carrier is a modem carrier. You can identify them by their metal screeching though you should find recordings to differentiate between a fax carrier and a modem carrier signal. You could connect to them over voip, I think, using a terminal program like Term90 or HyperTerminal. Okay, okay, I don't know offhand of any modern dial-up terminal programs. Guess I should research that. Might be a ton of BBSes under my nose and me without a trusty US Robotics.
  28. 2 points
    Likely going to be my first miss. I am just so out of the scene that I really do not have much desire to go to these anymore. They are just scenes now... or I turned into a jaded old man. Possibly both.
  29. 2 points
    T-Mobile? That doesn't make too much sense, T-Mobile (and its predecessors VoiceStream and Omnipoint) never operated analog networks. Matter of fact, neither did Sprint. T-Mo and Sprint were all digital from their inceptions. my first cell phone was an omnipoint "flip" phone... the flip was just a small plastic piece that covered the numbers when flipped closed... around 1996 or so....
  30. 2 points
    not sure, again probably depends on os/raid, but objectively don't see a reason why you couldn't repair a 1 in a live setting, other than sever performance degradation during the period its repairing, the read being 1/2 speed the whole time, and having to use read to fill up the other drive, which in 5 or 6 the performance would still degrade but not as much or for as long as they have the data spread among all of the drives. if you were really worried about it there is always the option of more drives, you could have some backup script or something, backup the 1 to a third drive once a week or something, and entirely unuse/power it otherwise, and then in the event of failure would just be to do the file changes from within that week and youd have a working pair again. or the obvious just a triplet used at all times, in which all 3 would have to fail to lose anything. where with 5 just 2 and you would probably lose a significant portion of the pot, depending on how the stripping is set up
  31. 2 points
    Once you are in a call, they can decode TTY-text, so they should be able to also decode DTMF. That is correct - it is fake. That is correct, too. Between you punching in the number and the phone dialing, a lot can actually happen: For example the phone making a modem-connection to the NCC to get the rate, etc. You can programm the phones to do pretty much every thing you want... Besides 0, almost all N11-numbers for (except 911) are just "aliases" to local phone numbers... And sometimes, they even alias local phone numbers (think of 411 -> 555-1212 -> XXX-555-1212 to treat every "request for information"-call at the same point of contact).
  32. 2 points
    Since you can't easily do MF, why not modify the code to pulse out 2600 when you push the digit keys, like the old pre-MF step tandems used? Timing should be 66 milliseconds of 2600 Hz, followed by 34 milliseconds of silence for each pulse, with about 500 milliseconds between each digit: Digit zero would be 10 sequences of 66ms/34ms 2600, with a 500ms pause before the next digit, for example. You still need to define a key to play 2600 for about 1.5 seconds for trunk seizure. You could also write the code to accept a number, then outpulse the entire number with the correct timings. There is a number on CNET that this can be used to dial with. This is essentially the method used by Cap'n Crunch and Joe Engressia to phreak step tandems or switches that accepted older SF trunks from step tandems. Routes that used this method of tone signalling were already pretty rare back in the late 60's and early 70s when they used this technique. You had to discover a number that routed through a step tandem from your dialing location, usually by trial and error. Vancouver, BC in Canada had one such switch. D.
  33. 2 points
    800-877-3542 - Older IVR of some kind. JCSwishMan33 and Ramsaso helped narrow down that it belongs to some large gas company. Listen to those crunchy recordings! Oh, also there's hidden options. The golden rule seems to be * goes back, and #/0 will hang up.
  34. 2 points
    If you want to get the absolute lowest price for telephone service, you want "metered service" or "message rate service". This is not offered in all areas, and it might not be what you really want. In my area, it cannot be ordered (and is not offered) online, it must be ordered over the phone, and it comes out to about $14 after taxes. Essentially, that price only gives you a dial tone, and you are charged for every local call you make. Think of it like a pay phone. In my area, most local calls are also timed on message rate service, so you don't pay per-call, you pay for the amount of time you talk in 3 or 5 minute increments. If you make a lot of calls, the cost can get out of hand quickly. However, if you only make a few calls per month, or call lots of numbers that don't answer, it might be a good option. Metered service is sometimes available with or without an allowance. In my area, the service without an allowance is cheapest, but if you pay $3 extra, you get an allowence of about $5. It can save you money if you make more than $3 of calls. It makes sense if you want a line primarily to receive calls, but you really need to do the math to make sure it's a good option for placing lots of calls. Just to repeat, phone pricing is controlled by each state and as a result, pricing is not consistent nationwide. In my state, prices vary city-to-city, so the only way to find out what's available is to call the phone company and ask them. In PA, they are legally obligated to tell you all of your options starting with the lowest, but they tend to do so only if you say something like "please tell me the pricing options for telephone service starting with the cheapest". If money isn't an object, just get the bundle!
  35. 2 points
    I'd heard of things like that happening, both with new flash drives and with those purchased secondhand (mostly eBay stories). Mine are usually immediately reformatted with a UDF filesystem anyway.
  36. 1 point
  37. 1 point
    No dice . Maybe! I wonder if a slow sweep tone or something would be in order. The pause/repeat thing sounds like it may be your long distance carrier changing routes. If you're okay with casual dialing (should be safe; I'd be sure, but I don't think it supes), try seeing if AT&T or MCI do the same. I'd be really disappointed if it was the case, but I was thinking this might just be the Nortel announcement card making that tone; they sometimes end calls with that same (or at least a similar) cause code. 706-219-0002 - Windstream NOC 434-223-6399 - Newer Otis elevator at university, on Meridian. 7200 is a Siemens elevator. 706-865 1112 - Ringout bridge 1113 - rec, "The number you have dialed is a party on your own line. Please hang up and allow the phone to ring several times before lifting the handset to talk." 1117 - Ringout 1118 - Ringout to Meatwitch VMB, Windstream Cleveland CO 1119 - Business 1120 - Ringout to Meatwitch VMB (CNAM: WINDSTREAM) 1121 - Loud, 20 hertz ringing x1 + hang up 1122 - Mitel PBX ringout to Express Messenger VMB, answers with **93604 1123 - Ringout 1124 - Ringout 1125 - Ringout 1126 - Ringout 1127 - Ringout 1128 - Ringout 1129 - Ringout 1130 - Modem 1131 - Ringout 1133 - Ringout 1134 - Ringout 1135 - Ringout 1136 - Ringout 1137 - Ringout to Meatwitch VMS 1138 - Ringout to Meatwitch VMS 1139 - Ringout 1140 - Ringout 1141 - Rings x1, hangs up quickly 1142 - Ringout 1143 - Ringout 1144 - Ringout 1145 - Ringout 1146 - Ringout 1147 - Modem 1148 - Modem 1149 - Ringout 1150 - Ringout 1151 - Ringout 1152 - Ringout 1153 - Ringout 1154 - Ringout 1155 - Ringout 1156 - Modem 1157 - Ringout 1158 - Ringout 1159 - Ringout 1160 - Ringout 1161 - Modem 1162 - Ringout 1163 - Ringout 1164 - Ringout to Meatwitch VMB 1166 - Ringout to Meatwitch VMB 1170 - Ringout 1171 - Ringout to Meatwitch VMB 1180 - Meatwitch VMB 1183 - Meatwitch VMB 1184 - Meatwitch VMB 1186 - Meatwitch VMB 1187 - Ringout 1190 - Really old AIS. Cognitronics? NIS report. 1191 - Same as 1190 1192 - Same as 1190 1193 - Same as 1190 1194 - Same as 1190 1195 - Same as 1190 1196 - Ringout 1197 - Ringout 1198 - Same as 1190
  38. 1 point
    617-534-0000 - Voicemail unavailable recording. 15A announcement machine (the kind the 5ESS uses) on a DMS-100? 617-248-9901 - Permanent signal announcement 617-248-9902 - Dial 1+NPA for toll calls rec 617-248-9970 - rec, "We're sorry, your call cannot be completed as dialed. You need additional digits to complete your call. This is a recording." 617-638-9905 - "This is an emergency telephone. Press 1 to talk..." 252-441-4392 - Norstar key system at Carolina Telephone Kill Devil Hills CO. Press * for options 207-442-9923 - Modem 207-442-9932 - 480 hertz tone!? Times out to ACB cause code 207-442-9936 - 620+480 hertz tone, times out to ACB cause code Those last two I'm really scratching my head on.
  39. 1 point
    I'd give it a week or so; they still have the weird tromboning arrangement to hit the C5 trunks set up. If it was going to be gone for good, they would've gotten rid of that.
  40. 1 point
    As I recall, the AT&T 4ESS tandems where that recording resides are regionally based. 074-T is Philadelphia and serves the mid-Atlantic region. I live in that area and I home on that as well.
  41. 1 point
    It was 70 years ago today, Sergeant Pepper taught the band to play. They've been going in and out of style but they're guaranteed to raise a smile. Having been some days in preparation, a splendid time is guaranteed for all. Initial UK (Parlophone) release = 1967 May 26 First US (Capitol) release = 1967 June 2
  42. 1 point
    ENOUGH WITH THE GODDAMN RAIN ALREADY!!!
  43. 1 point
  44. 1 point
    Not sure if many are aware but that February 2008 date was just the FCC saying "you don't have to continue to operate AMPS," not a "you HAVE to shut off AMPS"I would LOVE to see an AMPS phone associated with an analog system this year. Maybe I'll use my tax money to travel to a place where it works
  45. 1 point
    I dunno which is which, but there's at least a few different manufacturers of AWOSes. Doing a search for 'manufacturer "AWOS III"' came up with this; http://www.faa.gov/airports/aip/buy_american/media/nationwide-buy-american-waivers-issued.pdf So there's the All Weather 3000 and 900s, and the Vaisala AWOS series. There's a PDF somewhere of approved devices that's a little more comprehensive. I dunno who does the voice, but one thing I've noticed is if you start hitting random DTMF keys, even though the announcement doesn't stop, it seems to be listening. If you press enough, it'll hang up on you in the middle of a report. Also, this particular AWOS sounds like it could be even older then the Hood River one; 760-767-3308.
  46. 1 point
  47. 1 point
    Haha! As a customer, I look at Comcasts profits, and see that they are operating at less than 30% net profits, I say it's an upgrade needed for operations. Kind of like McDonalds whining that they don't have enough cows to keep up with people ordering Big Mac's. More customers eating more cows, means new farms to raise cattle. Not cry because paying customers are eating all your food. EDIT: don't you think spending billions reinventing in company stock instead of upgrading their network to handle Netflix "demand", shows they are putting assurances in a lot of future profit growth without upgrading to meet consumer demand?
  48. 1 point
    I don't know much at all about radio equipment. I was given 2 old hand-held radios, both Citizen TC-123's. I can't find anything about them online. About them: They have 3 preset channels (A,B,C), each with a pair of sockets for crystals. They also has a squelch dial. At the moment, it has 27.065 in the TX, 27.061 in the RX socket of channel A. (From what I've found online, this is now used as the emergency channel of modern CB) I've turned it on but haven't heard anything except for static. I can post pics of the inside if needed. 1) What type of radio would this be? Is this considered a ham radio? 2) Do I need a license to use it? 3) I'm assuming the sockets are so I can drop in new crystals to get other frequencies. How high would a unit like this be able to go? What frequency crystals should I try? 4) Would this be compatible with modern CB equipment if set on the same frequency? If so, can I set it to channel 19/whatever is most common? Where can I get new crystals 5) And finally, is it even worth the effort to play around with these, or should I just invest in modern stuff and save myself lots of effort? Thanks!
  49. 1 point
    There's a food court at the Riviera that's quiet. That might work. Just throwing it out there.
  50. 1 point
    I would use this in the threators also . Its just that there exspensive .