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  1. 6 points
    Here's the complete collection of recordings I grabbed of the Odessa 1AESS switch before the cutover. The recordings were made during late may, with the last batch (A-D recordings) made on June 2, 2017 -- days before the cutover. The most interesting recordings I found during the calls to the switch: 1AESS-A.wav - Highest quality recording/best example I have of what a normal call to the 1AESS intercept sounded like. Allows you to hear the background SIT-tone noise before recordings. 1AESS-D.wav - Highest quality recording/best example I have of what a normal call to the 1AESS supervision test sounded like. 1AESS-3.wav - Bizarre because the switch cut to busy after intercept, instead of cutting over to reorder like normal. 1AESS-11.wav - Bizarre because the call, without ring, goes to the 1AESS intercept recording for one cycle, then stops for 20 seconds, and returns the Hillsboro 4ESS '121-T!' recording. 1AESS-14.wav - Bizarre because the call, rings once, goes silent for 30 seconds, then returns the Hillsboro 4ESS '121-T!' recording. 1AESS-15.wav - Bizarre because the call, rings once, goes silent for 40 seconds, then returns a reorder. More descriptions on the other calls are available on the 1A_desc.txt file on the dropbox drive. https://www.dropbox.com/sh/xca3wwskn1mzwzt/AABJMpTS0XDL9NQQgiz4LVI4a?dl=0 Enjoy.
  2. 4 points
    There's another number to that; 3438. If you're hitting a route that gives you g.729 (sorta ruins that catchy song), it's not a bad idea to try both a few times. Interestingly, the transcoding seems to come on after the C5 chirps; those (and sometimes some Australian sounding ring) are always clear as day. So now when I found this - I actually think I found it with radio_phreak, but when I did, I was about as excited as you can expect. But something wasn't quite right. If you do a RESPORG lookup on 3438/7, it comes back as using the MCI/0222 network. If you call the number directly terminating to the Malaysian destination (you'll find it with a bit of searching) over MCI though, it's end to end SS7. After trying a bunch of carriers with no success, the theory we wound up with is that they were re-originating via a third party country; likely Australia, to shave a few cents off termination charges. Interestingly, when you hop on a conference on that access number, it'll allow you the option to contact customer service for the company, which is based out of Denver. The route you get is _definitely_ not C5. For whatever it's worth, there was another number until semi-recently; 3439 that routed a little differently. Usually it was more likely to get a transcoded route, or other weird things - one route had 450 hertz ringback before the call went offhook quite a lot . But anyway, for whatever it's worth, during Hurricane Sandy it gave you an error recording from a Santera OCX. If I remember right, the other numbers worked fine though. One thing I've noticed is during that song they play for hold music, sometimes it likes to disconnect you in weird ways. The hold music in question passes some notes a few times that definitely sound like 2400 hertz, so I wonder if that has anything to do with it (maybe we should pay attention to the supervision status), or if it's just an apathetic operator hanging up on you. Incidentally, when the call tears down with 2600, you'll hear this curious reorder tone from the international gateway that sorta fades in and out. Based on this, I wonder if it's a type 1 EWSD: https://pastebin.com/q1dvEcVw . So this isn't exactly C5, but a while ago, I found some Axtel DMS logs on Scribd. No, seriously. You can see from there they have quite a few R2 trunks provisioned for end users: 142785363-switch-a.pdf . We were playing with this on the bridge a few months ago - something I sorta want to get into again at some point; a few people seemed pretty excited about it. There's one particular number, +52-818-114-1500 (on the AX2P42 trunk group; labeled STA_CATARINA_CALL_CENTER_PBX_R2. If you look at page 224, you'll see the trunk group type configuration for this and many others; there's a bunch of R2 trunks with generic labels) that will send a backwards 4 in MFC (780 + 1140 hertz)to the switch - indicating a network error when it messes up. Which it occasionally does. Dunno how or if these can be seized, but it seemed worth mentioning. Speaking of which, I don't have the number for this; I had the bright idea of putting it on the speed dial for a calling card and then letting it expire, but Russia has some sort of strange signaling - perhaps another R2 variant floating about in their network. This particular call I remember being to Siberia: weirdmfs.flac . A lot of their switches use whatever this is. It enables them to send vacant number conditions and such over their signaling network. All I do here besides try and hit some DTMF is whistle 2600 twice; once to seize the trunk, and another time to make the switch get all angry. The tones you hear are the standard R1 frequency set, but obviously an R1 trunk never barks MFs back at you. EDIT: Crap, I forgot about the Cuba stuff. From what I understand, Havana if no other place has a reasonably modern network of Alcatel gear. As for the fixed GSM terminals, there's some older documents on Cuban telecom infrastructure lying around. All of them seem to point towards the Cuban fixed network being very over capacity. That could have something to do with that particular addition. As for Paraguay, radio_phreak mentioned to me a while back a particular set of numbers that would route to C5 trunks over some carriers. I believe it was +595-528-222-xxx. Back to the C5 stuff though, does anybody know where we can find a protocol spec document for it? That'll probably help us with some of the oddities we've found on some of these trunk groups. Another EDIT: http://www.itu.int/rec/T-REC-Q.140-Q.180/en Holy shit, another EDIT: http://www.binrev.com/forums/index.php?/topic/47028-portugal/#comment-364799 portugal_c5.flac One (hopefully) last thing - for anybody looking for international credit, I've found http://www.call2.com to be pretty good for the most part. Most of their routes look to be resold MCI, the rates are reasonable, and it tends to be decent quality. It is a callback service though, so it can be a little clunky for a large number of calls like in a scan. DMS-10 loops can be a good way to make this a little less painful. I feel kinda gross giving out a plug like that, but given the relative obscurity of the service and the content of the thread, it seems appropriate.
  3. 4 points
    0800 890 595 is now a (quite rare) example of the equipment engaged tone. I haven't done much looking for interesting switching/signalling since the early 2000s. It's got more difficult now because most people and businesses in poor countries have jumped straight to GSM (+successors). Back then, it would (as radio_phreak notes) be much more productive to look in the provincial towns and cities of poor countries than in their main cities. My preferred method was to look online for hotels or businesses in those backwater areas, ideally finding their fax numbers, and call those. Much prefer bothering a fax machine than disturbing a person. Now-a-days you need to do this armed with the country's dialling plan (wikipedia usually has these) - and most of the numbers you find will be mobiles. Re Cuba, I can't reach the supposed second dialtone for the US base via +53 99. The state telco is marketing the "fija alternativa" service - ie a GSM-based fixed service - suggesting aged and interesting POTS equipment exists. Calling from here, it's evident that their international gateway is something not outrageously ancient, because it promptly returns an appropriate SS7 code for incorrect prefixes - eg +53 41 000000 returns the usual SIT+"the number you have dialled has not been recognised" from my local exchange. +53 xx 300000 returns a Cuban intercept - in Spanish then English - after about 5 seconds of delay, where XX is any of the 2-digit areacodes listed at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telephone_numbers_in_Cuba. Sadly no signalling sounds are evident during the delays - I think I've tried all of them. I had a quick look for hotels in Panama and all the phone numbers I found were +507 6xxx xxxxx - ie mobiles. However, again, I'm hopeful that downstream of the international gateway is something elderly and interesting. +507 900 0000 sometimes gives an intercept - Spanish only - mentioning C&W Panama, again with a significant post-dial delay. +507 800 0000 gives my local telco's equipment engaged tone. +507 811 1111 was answered by a human +507 700 0000 is a different Spanish intercept, with a longer post-dial delay. +507 600 0000 or 500 0000 give my local telco's SIT+number not recognised intercept. +507 400 0000 is the same intercept-after-delay as 900 0000. +507 300 0000 is yet another Spanish intercept, with delay. +507 200 0000 has a very long delay then something times out any my local telco plays SIT+"sorry, there is a fault". +507 210 0000 has a long delay then the 900 0000 intercept +507 220 0000 rings, again after a delay, and is answered by some sort of automated service - in Spanish. No signalling sounds or evident, for me, in any of the above :-(
  4. 3 points
    If you dial extension 8411-8414 it will make the automated voice say "Lane ""1-4"" Most pharmacies dont have more than two lanes. So if youre there waiting for a script, dial ext 8413 to hear the voice on the loudspeaker say "lane 3" and watch the employees confusion. its hilarious.
  5. 3 points
    Long time lurker.... registered recently..... first post... I know this thread is a bit old, figured I could be of some assistance here: Auto-scanned the 630713XXXX exchange (Took about ~15 hours), then did some manual checking: Number Auto-Scan Result Manual Scan, Comments 6307130025 VOICE Voicemail 6307130027 VOICE Subscriber 6307130107 VOICE Voicemail 6307130138 VOICE Voicemail (Nokia) 6307130460 VOICE UMTS Operations Support Group (Nokia -- "Please try again in 15 minutes") 6307130484 VOICE "We're sorry, but the blackout period for the transtition of the 401k record keeper is in effect on January 6th, please call back on January 7th." Repeats, then hangs up. 6307130563 VOICE Subscriber 6307130760 VOICE "Thank you for calling the Nokia workplace resources call center." 6307130869 VOICE Voicemail 6307130990 VOICE Voicemail Access Number, with working directory. 6307130996 VOICE Voicemail Access Number, with working directory. 6307131006 VOICE Subscriber 6307131229 VOICE Subscriber 6307131265 VOICE "Sorry, this automated attendant number is not available at the moment, goodbye." 6307131292 VOICE Subscriber 6307131304 VOICE "The called extension is busy" >> Voicemail 6307131329 VOICE Subscriber 6307131335 VOICE Ring >> Reorder 6307131553 VOICE Voicemail 6307131984 FAX Fax tones 6307132349 FAX Fax tones 6307133200 VOICE Voicemail Access Number, with working directory. 6307133678 FAX Possibly a modem. 6307134150 VOICE Subscriber 6307134389 VOICE Subscriber 6307134433 VOICE Voicemail 6307134484 VOICE Subscriber 6307134633 VOICE Voicemail 6307134967 VOICE Voicemail 6307135012 VOICE Voicemail 6307135163 VOICE Voicemail (reads back extension number) 6307135305 FAX Possibly a modem. 6307135353 VOICE Voicemail 6307135400 VOICE Voicemail 6307136056 FAX Fax tones 6307136081 FAX Fax tones 6307136082 FAX Fax tones 6307136091 VOICE Possibly an elevator?? Buzzing/Static on line. Hangs up with #. 6307136153 VOICE Another elevator phone? Hangs up with # again. 6307137073 VOICE Subscriber 6307137163 VOICE Voicemail 6307137180 VOICE Voicemail 6307137339 VOICE Subscriber 6307138416 VOICE Subscriber 6307138507 VOICE Voicemail 6307138668 VOICE Voicemail 6307138761 VOICE Voicemail 6307139039 VOICE Voicemail 6307139328 VOICE Voicemail 6307139379 VOICE Subscriber 6307139650 VOICE Voicemail 6307139764 VOICE Voicemail 6307139885 VOICE Subscriber 6307139988 VOICE Voicemail If there's any interest I can run a scan on 630979XXXX.
  6. 3 points
    This is just a beginning to get people started. Feel free to add onto more if you wish. The 'Threads' links you will see are from threads from these forums where the topic has been discussed before. I wrote this a few months ago so there may even be more threads about them if you search around. This list was made from numerous threads about the same topics; to stop the bitching from the Department of Redundancy Department. 1. How do I use exploits? ::Discussions - 1. ::Programs for assistance - Nmap and Nessus. ::Reference material - Security Focus, and Irongeek. 2. How do I get the admin password for Windows XP? ::Discussions - 1. ::Programs for assistance - Login recovery, and John the Ripper. ::Reference material - Password Recovery, Irongeek.com, and many others. I would suggest reading the discussion thread. 3. How do I hack a website? ::Discussions - 1 , 2, 3. 4. How do I get around web filtering like Websense? ::Discussions - 1, 2, 3. ::Programs for assistance - It is probally easier to use a proxy to get around web filtering software. ::Reference material - Babelfish, Proxy Blind, and Proxify. 5. What are proxies and how do they work? ::Discussions - 1, 2. ::Programs for assistance - There are tons of proxy server lists out there. Suggest doing a Google search for "Proxy", "Proxies", "Proxy Server", etc. ::Reference material - Wiki Proxy Info. 6. Where can I find more Hacker media like HackTV or BRR? For general Hacker Media information check out the Forums. ::Reference material - Hackermedia, Infonomicon, Old Skool Phreak, WhiteSword TV, Packet Sniffers, Hak5. 7. What are some good books to read that will teach me about hacking? This all depends on what you are interested in learning. ::Reference material - Cryptography, Programming, Networking, and Social Engineering. 8. Where can I find a meeting to attend, and what if no one is in my area? If no one is in your area then start up your own meeting, and let others know about it! ::Reference material - Bin Rev meetings - BRR listeners map, DefCon groups, 2600 meetings, and also search for a LUG (Linux User Group) in your area. 9. What Linux distro is the best? ::Discussions - 1. ::Reference material - Rundown on different distros, a test that may help you decide which is best for you, and you may also want to check out more distros' for yourself. 10. How do I learn how to hack? ::Discussions - 1, 2. 11. I want to program, where should I start? ::Discussions - 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22. C Book, Tutorial, Windows Compiler, *nix Compiler, *nix Compiler How-To. Python Website, Book, Tutorial, Compiler, Compiler How-To.
  7. 2 points
    Great to see some new faces! Especially in this thread. 0051 is a DATU. 0037 is a 105-type test as I think it's officially called. I think the idea is they do trunk testing. In any case, press 2, #, etc to make it produce tones and noise. 0 commonly hangs up on those things. 407-238-6209,6238 - Elevators on hotel PBX (Nortel Meridian) 407-238-6214 - Modem on hotel PBX: CONNECT CentOS release 6.5 (Final) Kernel 2.6.32-431.29.2.el6.x86_64 on an x86_64 XetaCAS_22832_MarriottRoyalPalms login: 843-414-0052 - rec, "We're sorry, your telephone is temporarily out of order. There may be a receiver off the hook. Please check your main telephone and extensions. Charleston, South Carolina. 843-1. CHTN." 502-753-0021 - 17A announcement machine 502-753-0059 - IVR, "Please enter your home phone number" 504-648-0010 - 17A announcement machine
  8. 2 points
    970-350-00xx scan by Mountain Hell, 5/1/2018 A rather boring 5ESS in Greeley, Colorado. CLLI code GRELCOMADS0. 0000: fax 0001: ringout 0002: reorder 0003: ringout 0004: ring to disco/nis 0005: tone 0006: ring to disco/nis 0007: disco/nis 0008: busy 0009: milliwatt 0010: acb 0011: tone 0012: reorder 0013: reorder 0014: disco/nis 0015: ringout 0016: the number 9703500016 has been disconnected. (x2) no further information is avialable about this number. (off-hook tone x2) 0017: the number 9703500017 has been disconnected. (x2) no further information is avialable about this number. (off-hook tone x2) 0018: the number 9703500018 has been disconnected. (x2) no further information is avialable about this number. (off-hook tone x2) 0019: ringout 0020: carrier 0021: ringout 0022: ringout 0023: ring to disco/nis 0024: ring to disco/nis 0025: disco/nis 0026: busy 0027: busy 0028: dialtone 0029: carrier 0030: reorder 0031: the number 9703500031 is in service. please try your call again. (x2) (off-hook tone x2) 0032: ringout 0033: ringout 0034: ringout 0035: you have reached greeley main ds0 970-350. (x2) 0036: (pat fleet) this local call has changed to 10 digits. it is not necessary to dial a 1 when calling this number. please redial using area code 303. (x2) 0037: ring to disco/nis 0038: ring ro disco/nis 0039: disco/nis 0040: (old lady) we're sorry, it is not necessary to dial the digits 950 before dialing your carrier access code. please hang up and try your call again. (x2) 0041: (old lady) we're sorry, it is not necessary to dial a carrier access code for the number you have dialed. please hang up and try your call aga-- (x2) 0042: (m) we're sorry, the number you dialed cannot be reached with the access code you dialed. please check the code and try again or call your carrier for assistance. (x2) 0043: (pat fleet) we're sorry, due to network difficulties your long distance call cannot be completed at this time. please try your call again later. (x2) 0044: (old lady) we're sorry, due to network difficulties your long distance call cannot be completed at this time. please try your call later. (x2) 0045: (old lady) we're sorry, due to network difficulties your long distance call cannot be completed at this time. please try your call later. (x2) 0046: (old lady) we're sorry, in order to complete this call, you must first dial a 1-0 and the three digit carrier access code. please try your call again or call your long distance carrier for assistance. (x2) 0047: disco/nis 0048: ring to disco/nis 0049: ring to disco/nis 0050: milliwatt (5 sec) 0051: ring to disco/nis 0052: ring to disco/nis 0053: disco/nis 0054: disco/nis 0055: disco/nis 0056: (f) please do not hang up. the voicemail system temporarily needs you to re-enter the number you are calling. please re-enter the number you are calling then press pound. 0057: 105-type test 0058: reorder 0059: disco/nis 0060: disco/nis 0061: disco/nis 0062: disco/nis 0063: ring to acb 0064: acb 0065: disco/nis 0066: (pat fleet) we're sorry, it is not necessary to dial a 1 or 0 when calling this number, will you please hang up and try your call again. (x2) 0067: (old lady) we're sorry, you must first dial a 1 when calling this number, will you please hang up and try your call again. (x2) 0068: disco/nis 0069: the number you are calling was blocked and cannot be called back using your last call return service. (x2) 0070: (deeper pat fleet) your long distance call cannot be completed because your service has been restricted. please contact your centurylink business office. 0071: (deeper pat fleet) the number cannot be reached now. please hang up and try again later. 0072: (pat fleet) we're sorry, you have dialed a number which cannot be reached from your calling area. 0073: disco/nis 0074: (some lady) telephone service has not been installed at this location. please dial 811 when you are ready to establish your home telephone service. a service representative will describe the options available to you and take your order. thank you. 0075: (pat fleet, bad) we're sorry, your call did not go through, will you please try your call again. (x2) 0076: (pat fleet) we're sorry, your call cannot be completed as dialed. please check the number and dial again. remember, colorado now has two area codes. 0077: (old lady) we're sorry, your call cannot be completed as dialed. please check your instruction manual or call repair service for assistaance. (x2) 0078: (pat fleet) the number called is busy. a special ringing will tell you when the line is free. please hang up now. (x2) 0079: (pat fleet) the number called cannot be reached. please hang up now. (x2) 0080: (pat fleet) you have canceled your request. please hang up now. (x2) 0081: (pat fleet) if you'd like to make a call, please hang up and try again. if you need help, hang up and then dial your operator. (x2) 0082: (pat fleet) this call requires a coin deposit. please hang up momentarily then redial your call by first depositing the local rate posted on the instruction card. (x2) 0083: one ring then silence 0084: ringout 0085: (deeper pat fleet) the last call to your telephone cannot be traced and no charge will be added to your bill. please hang up and call the centurylink call identification center at 18005820655 if you need further assistance. once again, that number is 1800582-- (x2) 0086: (pat fleet) the number was free but it has just become busy again. please hang up. you may reactivate if you wish by redialing the original code. (x2) 0087: (pat fleet) your call has been completed however the party you are calling is not receiving calls at this time. (x2) 0088: silent switchman test 0089: rings once then silence 0090: (pat fleet) call trace cannot be activated at this time. please try again in a few minutes if you have not received another call. (x2) 0091: ring to disco/nis 0092: disco/nis 0093: ring to disco/nis 0094: ring to disco/nis 0095: disco/nis 0096: ring to disco/nis 0097: ring to disco/nis 0098: ring to disco/nis 0099: ring to disco/nis
  9. 2 points
    I found something kinda funny yet possibly intentional and thought you guys might appreciate it. So assuming it's after hours or the weekend where you are, give a Morgan Stanley office a call. Pretty much any of them will work. If you don't have one, here: 800-488-0181. Pretty much all of them have toll-frees if you look at the branch's website - http://www.morganstanleyfa.com/locator/ . Anyway, when the IVR picks up, press 2 and it'll ask you for an "eleven digit extension". Give it a toll-free, and it'll connect you. While it will pass ANI, it does accept calls from payphones and will hide class of service digits. Interesting, it does add an RDNIS field to the call to indicate it was forwarded. Try calling 800-330-8829 from it to get the number it's claiming to forward from.
  10. 2 points
    Some recordings came to me from a source that I trust of phone calls from Russia and around the Baltic area in general, taken 2 or so months ago and in a few of the recordings you'll sometimes hear tones before people answer the phone. I'll put a compilation together soon-ish and upload here for people to hear. The audio can be tinny in places, nothing I can do about that unfortunately.
  11. 2 points
    904-266-9604 - Nortel key system owned by MCI/Verizon; Mister Rogers works here. +800-6669-5588 - China Telecom NIS rec, mildly weird stuff happens afterwards 416-591-0105 - One of many numbers that goes to a Octel VMS owned by Bell Canada, tells you you don't have access to the advanced intelligent network 800-483-0015 - Verizon office with Rolm PBX 603-746-0125 - Weird thingie on analog line, picks up with square wave beep 603-746-9911 - IVR, "Thank you for calling. Enter your user ID and press pound to continue." 480-792-3996 - PCAnywhere modem on Nortel PBX 307-782-9997 - "The number you have dialed is not authorized to receive incoming calls." <Nortel EDRAM digits> "085501" 307-782-0000 - <480 hertz beep in background> "Union Telephone operator, how can I help you?" - TOPS position, will dial local numbers for you. 360-985-1902 - Weird sounding dialtone
  12. 2 points
    "I spent three hours last year convincing the AT&T call center that they needed to get their line back on a replaced pole. They refused to believe that a line labeled Western Electric was theirs. Kept saying it was the electric company's line." (jackalope48; http://www.city-data.com/forum/texas/2772893-end-era.html#post48383373)
  13. 2 points
    I picked this up in a heap of old computer, radio, and telephone equipment, from a guy who had been an engineer in the Navy, then an engineer/lineman/programmer at Bell Labs in NJ: It's an *actual* milliwatt! I can't find the BSP for it online, but I did find a hardcopy on eBay, so I'll scan that in when I get it. Battery test points, this is the battery (well, the top of an old one): 45V "B batteries" were common in old radios and other higher-than-we're-used-to voltages were common in other types of test gear. For instance, a kick meter uses a different 45V battery (looks like a giant 9V and is still made). Top of the internal circuit subassembly, the battery goes in the space seen at the top of the picture: Here's the circuit: Typical Western Electric, potted networks, switchboard jacks, and expensive resistors and capacitors. Not yet sure if the pot varies pitch or level. You can see there's a single very old GE transistor in a metal can package clipped to the side of the uppermost (4002A) network, presumably the only active component in the circuit.
  14. 2 points
    Just found this photo and article, figured I'd leave it here. https://www.rcrwireless.com/20171109/network-infrastructure/switching-it-up-bidding-farewell-to-the-1aess-switch-tag6
  15. 2 points
    I go all over the US for work and vacation, and when I do I like to see how the local network homes on various tandems (AT&T, MCI, Sprint) when I can. I like to do it from landlines and cellphones since both route differently. I also do this with VOIP carriers since often times they dump you on the POTS network at various places, and this can either be static or dynamic. (Can you say Tandem round robin?) Often times calls from landline, cellular or VOIP go to the newer "edge switches" that are in the format of NPA-xL (like 412-9L). I believe most of these are 5ESS based. But most of the time you can reach a 4ESS in the format of xxx-T. Anyhow, I was in a very rural place in Wyoming in May while on vacation. It was a rest stop in the middle of nowhere. The rest stop used to have a pay phone (you can tell it was there and removed), but they did have a microcell for Verizon Wireless (obviously fed by DSL). Doing my test for AT&T, it did the round robin as I suspected (some sort of VOIP backhaul) and I came up on 088-T a few times. That *used* to be the AT&T tandem for San Diego. They retired the 4ESS a few years ago, but now it comes up in the "new" voice that AT&T is using for the new generation "N4E" system.The N4E uses the old 4ESS software hosted in a virtual environment in newer hardware (lot smaller footprint and more in tune with modern packet switching). Sure enough, I was in San Diego last week and tried it from a COCOT. Yup, they do have a new N4E and has the new voice on the trailer. So I'm wondering how many of the existing 4ESS systems will be replaced by N4E systems? I also wonder how many 4ESS and N4E systems are out there. I found a N4E in Scottsdale, AZ (NPA 480) not too long ago. Haven't explored what else is new out there recently.
  16. 2 points
    So today, I was thinking about a few people I'd talked to recently - they told me they were into the idea of scanning, but because of their lack of free time/direction, it was hard to find space in their lives for this sort of thing. So I was thinking; should I build a thing with my Dialogic box that automatically dials ranges that look potentially fun, and let people review the recordings/manually make a description of what's actually on the line? There could be a rough level of signal detection using the DSP; enough to let you search by what you'd like to see most; whether it be recordings, VMBs, modems or dialtones or whatever, and let you select by region or operating company. Maybe some more powerful signal detection could be tacked on at a later point that could recognize certain manufacturers or switch types. This would be a pretty significant undertaking, so I'd like to know if anybody is interested before I actually do this. If you don't actively scan and would like to, would this help turn the tide for you a little?
  17. 2 points
  18. 2 points
    My understanding is the switch portion of the packet switch is called a call agent (typically -CA0 or whatever if you're looking at a CLLI). A media gateway is just something that takes analog or TDM trunks/lines or whatever and interfaces them with the call agent. Sorta like a huge ATA. What differentiates a packet switch from a circuit switch (as far as I know) is that a packet switch internally uses packetized transport, while a circuit switch uses a time slot interchange to connect traffic. Though this isn't always black and white; sometimes media gateways have time slot interchanges. I guess if you want to be all lawyerly about it, that's technically not part of the switch. Then there's the term softswitch. As far as equipment vendors are concerned, I honestly think that's just a bullshit marketing term. A softswitch, as they put it, is a switch that's based entirely in software. A lot of packet switches will consolidate some components from the design of a circuit switch into software, but they're sold as custom, proprietary blades; there's a snowball's chance in hell you're running CS-2000 or Metaswitch software on a vanilla PC. There are things like Freeswitch and Asterisk that are actually softswitches, but the line between what is and isn't called one has been blurred by marketing weasels.
  19. 2 points
    Imagine if the Internet regressed back to 24.4, 33.6, or 56K for 24 hours? Will never happen, but made the start up sound on meh Windows to a 56K modem connecting. The memories. :-)
  20. 2 points
    I was pretty active back in 2009/2010 with exploration and scanning, this is to the best of my recollection In the UK there was some widely shared numbers that in the 90s were C5 directs as well as being free to call (0800 numbers), by 2009-2010 time only two remained: Bahamas on 0800 890 135 (it had some kind of filter on and you wasn't able to seize at any point during the call) and Paraguay on 0800 890 595, outside of the capital city sometimes numbers in Paraguay would travel over C5 routes too. In addition to this pre-earthquake calls to certain parts of Haiti would travel over C5 lines when you called numbers outside of Port-au-Prince, post earthquake in 2011 they for obvious reasons no longer worked. As far as numbers I'd have to dig through my old notes which are put away goodness knows where. Cuba was a place that I was planning on scanning before I became too busy with life and dropped out, I believe they have (had?) a mixture of the latest Chinese stuff in Havana and some of the older Soviet era crossbar stuff.
  21. 2 points
    Interesting. That's one of the tandems in Houston, TX. Mind if I ask you what you dialed to reach it?
  22. 2 points
    I just googled that and guess what: https://int3.cc/products/usbcondoms haha It doesn't say in the description that it prevents your phone from frying, but logically that's the first device to fry...
  23. 2 points
    Yeah, there are USB isolators you can get from industrial suppliers that will protect your machine, too (used to prevent a catastrophic failure on a machine tool from blowing up the control system). I would probably just grab the cheapest throwaway laptop in the parts heap/thrift store/whatever and use it, if I were going to check these out. Another thing to look at is local geocaches. I've found a few on hikes that had USB drives in them.
  24. 2 points
    I still use flash drives to take stuff to untrusted computers -- for example, when I take something to the print shop to be run off in large format. These types of places (print/copy shops, library, et c.) don't run a primary business of having safe, secure computers, and they let you plug in and run pretty much anything, so I will typically use a flash drive to take files, then nuke it when I get home. I don't log into anything on those computers, I've seen people at the print shop logged in with their cloud storage, email, whatever. Seems like a great way to get keylogged or your session cookie swiped or something. For moving stuff around between computers I trust, yeah, I don't really use flash drives anymore. Ironically I do still use floppies -- but that's only because part of my business is legacy systems repair/maintenance.
  25. 2 points
    Thank you @tekio These are all helpful
  26. 2 points
    Yeah, if you're looking at old scan textfiles then a carrier is a modem carrier. You can identify them by their metal screeching though you should find recordings to differentiate between a fax carrier and a modem carrier signal. You could connect to them over voip, I think, using a terminal program like Term90 or HyperTerminal. Okay, okay, I don't know offhand of any modern dial-up terminal programs. Guess I should research that. Might be a ton of BBSes under my nose and me without a trusty US Robotics.
  27. 2 points
    Likely going to be my first miss. I am just so out of the scene that I really do not have much desire to go to these anymore. They are just scenes now... or I turned into a jaded old man. Possibly both.
  28. 2 points
    T-Mobile? That doesn't make too much sense, T-Mobile (and its predecessors VoiceStream and Omnipoint) never operated analog networks. Matter of fact, neither did Sprint. T-Mo and Sprint were all digital from their inceptions. my first cell phone was an omnipoint "flip" phone... the flip was just a small plastic piece that covered the numbers when flipped closed... around 1996 or so....
  29. 2 points
    not sure, again probably depends on os/raid, but objectively don't see a reason why you couldn't repair a 1 in a live setting, other than sever performance degradation during the period its repairing, the read being 1/2 speed the whole time, and having to use read to fill up the other drive, which in 5 or 6 the performance would still degrade but not as much or for as long as they have the data spread among all of the drives. if you were really worried about it there is always the option of more drives, you could have some backup script or something, backup the 1 to a third drive once a week or something, and entirely unuse/power it otherwise, and then in the event of failure would just be to do the file changes from within that week and youd have a working pair again. or the obvious just a triplet used at all times, in which all 3 would have to fail to lose anything. where with 5 just 2 and you would probably lose a significant portion of the pot, depending on how the stripping is set up
  30. 2 points
    Once you are in a call, they can decode TTY-text, so they should be able to also decode DTMF. That is correct - it is fake. That is correct, too. Between you punching in the number and the phone dialing, a lot can actually happen: For example the phone making a modem-connection to the NCC to get the rate, etc. You can programm the phones to do pretty much every thing you want... Besides 0, almost all N11-numbers for (except 911) are just "aliases" to local phone numbers... And sometimes, they even alias local phone numbers (think of 411 -> 555-1212 -> XXX-555-1212 to treat every "request for information"-call at the same point of contact).
  31. 2 points
    http://www.digitalbond.com/blog/2013/10/22/call-yourself-a-hacker-lose-your-4th-amendment-rights/ Apparently saying that you like hacking on things without specifying "things" means you're automatically assumed to be compromising systems and that you're going to destroy evidence so they might as well take all of your equipment preemptively. So I guess hacking together a high water sensor for the basement, since I'm calling it "hacking," means I'll destroy evidence in legal investigations and that I like to break into systems I don't own all the time. Bullshit.
  32. 2 points
    It's basically what C.N.N. tells sheeple a "hacker" is. The average person doesn't know anything about technology, so they look at what Kim Komando (or other "technology experts") write on CNN and USA Today. Total rubbish! I mean, she says, "a hacker broke into Home Depot and stole peoples' credit card numbers. Bad hackers!". So... that's what people think; architects, mail carriers, police officers, and judges. Doesn't matter what they do for a living, if Kim Komando says its true, its gotta be true. However, if someone kept breaking into a bank's vault and stealing money that way.... They'd say, "crap my banks sucks. It needs a new vault and better security. Of course a burglar will sneak in and rob a bank if they leave the doors and vault unlocked or insecure".
  33. 1 point
    Like everyone says every time we do one of these, it's been a while! Show us your tastes in shameless materialism! $30 PCIE quad T1/E1 Dialogic DM3 card https://www.ebay.com/itm/Dialogic-Digital-Fax-Board-T1-E1-PCIe-DMV1200BTEPEQ-DMV1200BTEPJP-Telephony/282838946135?epid=1922689281&hash=item41da83d157:g:IAYAAOSwR21ZwpAK These are really nice cards for a number of reasons. The one holdback is you really need to know C to make them worth your while. If you have anything that speaks T1 and can stomach a bit of programming though, they are very much worth it. I'm running a similar model that routinely gets at least a couple hours of use every day. https://www.ebay.com/itm/Cisco-IAD2431-SPIAD2431-1T1E1-V03-2-Port-10-100-Wired-Router-IAD2431-1T1E1/263503336710?epid=99404097&hash=item3d5a05d506:g:KFIAAOSwaMhZwtZb Cisco IAD2431-1T1E1 router. You can't beat a Meridian or Definity for home use - there's no getting around that, but these are surprisingly flexible for a home network if you can tolerate the Cisco CLI, have a channel bank to use some analog lines with, and don't have enough room for a larger PBX like the aforementioned ones (and don't want to write a switch program to work with the card I just linked; they have GR-303 stacks). These particular models do TDM hairpinning as well, so the call is end to end circuit switched when there's no DSP involvement. There's really cheap VIC modules for FXO, ISDN BRI (though it won't do data calls), FXS (I'd recommend the channel bank though; I like it better than the Cisco analog stuff), etc lying around as well to make it interface with whatever you have. Just beware; it does have IVR capabilities, but they kinda suck. https://www.ebay.com/itm/Used-Carrier-Access-Adit-600-Unit-with-3-FXS-Cards-TDM-Controller/183114060632?hash=item2aa272d358:g:HE0AAOSwJGlZhPg7 Adit 600 channel bank. Cheap as they come, and as good as they get for home POTS stuff. They also do weird things like ISDN BRI if you can find the cards for them. 8434DX phone for the Definity. The VFD tends to be indescribably awesome on these, and on the later phones (post-1997 or so; look for any without the AT&T logo), have off the shelf Noritake VFDs you can get for cheap to swap them with. Especially nice if you get stuck with a set that has a worn VFD. https://www.ebay.com/itm/Avaya-Lucent-Definity-8434DX-Display-Phone-in-Black-Refurbished-1Yr-Warranty/360688304873?hash=item53fab2c2e9:g:VywAAOSwaB5Xtk5r https://www.ebay.com/itm/Telos-Zephyr-ISDN-Codec-9202-Layer-III-II/232683424480?hash=item362d034ae0:g:TS0AAOSwjY1aixyk Telos Zephyr; ISDN MP2/MP3 audio transceiver. These are buckets of fun if you have access to one; most radio stations and recording studios have compatible models you can connect to and get really nice sounding feeds of their mixing consoles from. Also, http://wpr.org/isdn/ . The newer Xstream models tend to answer automatically for normal phone calls and patch you into their audio input instead of deny them as these do. https://www.ebay.com/itm/TASCAM-DR-07-Portable-Digital-Recorder-W-SD-Card/112853473299?epid=99407338&hash=item1a46975813:g:cDAAAOSwHM1any6e Tascam DR-07; these are flash based field recorders. I've been using one for about eight years, and can attest to them being a great way to record your, er, mishaps on the PSTN, among other things. Also, they tend to not break. https://www.ebay.com/itm/Meridian-NTFX00-M5317-ISDN-Office-Phone-Business-Telephone-FREE-SHIPPING/281650822675?hash=item4193b27e13:g:pJMAAOSwqu9VHZ9O Nortel ISDN BRI phone.
  34. 1 point
    This guy, er, doesn't seem very receptive to new things. That being said, in all fairness, how contemporary an audio codec is is extremely relative. AAC is certainly one of the more used ones out there, and it was introduced a year before the Cook codec this guy is using. It still doesn't change the relatively low sample rate or that it buffers like it's 1998 (niche product or not, who pays for an effectively broken stream exactly?) or, well, that Real Player is still Real Player. That whole "I have a black box and nobody is allowed to touch it" model reminds me a lot of the other crap that faded into obscurity, like QSound, Q-Zar and HD Radio. I always thought the huge resistance to anybody seeing how it worked was hilarious.
  35. 1 point
    We know that in Russia and the former soviet states -- there's much more to be had than CCITT5 still. Me and one or two of the other BinRev people have located about a dozen or so (still finding new ones) switches in that area that still use in-band 2600 signaling -- even more surprisingly, these switches use 2600 SF/Dial Pulse signaling rather than MF! 2 of said switches we've managed to find out a way to reliably bluebox/SF-box -- and there's one that is still a work in progress, and it is yet to be determined whether it's SFable or not.
  36. 1 point
    What is this solid tone it goes to after the ringback? TestNumber?.wav Yeah I came across these on a number of calls as well, I thought they had something to do with supervision. I will try to get a landline (Unfortunately I'm really out in the sticks), It's such a shame to record these on VOIP. ChargeTones?.wav CallWithMetallicSoundingClanks.wav MetallicClank.wav - This is the sound amplified. This was after calling a valid number that supes usually, weird things happen sometimes just calling the same number. AISBrokenOrShittyRoute.wav
  37. 1 point
    The number you have dialed is a party on your line. Please hang up for a moment to allow sufficient time for the called party to answer, then lift your receiver. This is a recording.
  38. 1 point
    I figured we should start a list of countries that still use CCITT5 for international calls. It would be cool to get a list of country codes and prefixes. For testing this stuff I recommend using Blue Beep on DosBox, which is available from Text Files via the Wikipedia article. Use the one with the source code, as its more up to date. Check out this text file Blue Boxing in the Late 90s for more information on how this stuff works. The CIA World Factbook has information on the phone systems in use in every country in the world. World Factbook Numbers I have found so far that use it in some form: United States Toll Free International Direct Numbers 866-284-3437 - C5 Trunk to Malaysia (maybe) 888-647-6843 - C5 Trunk to Argentina via Sprint 877-655-0054 - C5 Trunk to Argentina via AT&T 877-278-9344 - C5 Trunk to Argenina via MCI
  39. 1 point
    037T was just converted from old 4E to N4E dialed from Indonesia. 038T as of a few days ago has not been converted. Both of those tandems are located in Houston, TX, where I live. 037T.flac
  40. 1 point
    What do you mean? and is Opencache an alternative to Geocache for North Muricans?
  41. 1 point
    I was a TSPS (dial 0 or 0+) operator in the late 1970s and it was very possible. If I remember correctly we key pulsed 700 + the subject phone number and it would cut right in on the line. We could hear the conversation of both parties. The purpose was for emergency interrupts. This would be limited to phones that we served as local operators. (Charlotte & most of Western NC) I could not be used for anything outside the area. Of course this was done on official telco equipment. Whether it could be accessed by the phreakers with a blue box is beyond me.
  42. 1 point
    This thread made me wanna call a CVS as well, so I did just that. I spoofed the main number as my number and was placed inside some kind of VMB that wanted me to enter my password, no idea how their password system works.
  43. 1 point
    In an excellent article here, Iron Geek talks about various Win 7 items of interest to security. In his discussions of data in the registry, he says many times, "Values are in HEX, but readable if you open them in ASCII view." I'm trying to figure out how to do this. There's no obvious mechanism in Regedit for reading registry data in ASCII. My efforts on Google led me to a few rather old utilities that don't seem to work as advertised. Any advice would be appreciated.
  44. 1 point
    File Name: Binary Revolution Radio - 015 - Deadly Halon! File Submitter: StankDawg File Submitted: 15 Jan 2010 File Category: Binary Revolution Radio Original Release Date: 2003-10-14 Hosts: StankDawg & vooduhal The age old question: college or certification?, <a href="http://www.duke.edu/">some colleges suck</a>, but go to college, mut3 goin' to college, Stank's been around the block..., <a href="http://forums.binrev.com/">forums move</a>, <a href="http://gallery.binrev.com/">gallery up</a>, Stank gets "A" on cyberlaw test, kiosk(w00t) -> loophole allows free access, no weightlifters(OMFG!!!), no luxury of dropping, go to <a href="http://www.hope.net/">HOPE conference</a>, DEADLY HALON story?...no, how about voodu's deadly "running into the door" story, <a href="http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/archive/18/2003/07/4/56763">agpgart</a> sux0red so voodu blew his vidcard, EULAs are teh sux0r (plus nobody reads em), benchmarking illegal thanks to EULA?, you DO NOT own your software, you cannot reverse engineer your software but you can open your car can't you?!, copyrighting databases, public information = not copyrightable (<a href="http://www.arl.org/info/frn/copy/databasebill1003.pdf">yet!</a>), <a href="http://www.verisign.com/">Verisign</a> personal info database, <a href="http://www.amazon.com/">Amazon</a> knows what you did last summer and knows where your neighbor lives, <a href="http://www.spectorsoft.com/products/eBlaster_Windows/entry.asp?affil=1200">eblaster</a> from <a href="http://www.spectorsoft.com/">spectorsoft</a> records ANYTHING, companies WILL monitor you, use encryption!!, shouts to the Cubs (AGAIN!!!). note from StankDawg: Despite my shoutz to the Cubs in this episode, they went on to lose in game 7 of the 2003 NLCS to the Florida Marlins after a great series of baseball. The annual chant of cubs fans begins again: "Just wait 'til next year!" Click here to download this file
  45. 1 point
    File Name: Binary Revolution Radio - 001 - The Premier! File Submitter: StankDawg File Submitted: 13 Jan 2010 File Updated: 14 Jan 2010 File Category: Binary Revolution Radio Original Release Date: 2003-07-08 Hosts: StankDawg & w1nt3rmut3 first ever binrev episode, mut3 has been introduced to engineering and hacked redhat at the same time, Stank plays <a href="archive/www.webtalkguys.com">webtalkradio</a> clip, <a href="http://www.spitzner.net/">Lance Spitzner</a> gets f**knut of the month, who is "Juarez"??, journalists with integrity..waaa?!, props to Andy Sullivan, emails/feedback are important, "hacker" term discussed, hacking should be fun, zilterio..WTF?!, companies don't report hack-ins, stank gives the customary 30 days after finding an exploit, blended threats: wave of the future or blast from the past?, props <a href="http://www.oldskoolphreak.com/">rfa</a>, dual, logan5, DDP members, bland, shouts to the <a href="http://www.2600.com/">2600</a> meetings, send email to: letters [at] binrev [dot] com Click here to download this file
  46. 1 point
    please guys there have been 14 views on this topic, couldn't there be a couple of replies?
  47. 1 point
    nose smush [edit] Now I want some sushi......
  48. 1 point
    You can't put the shit back in the horse. Another mirror: eidt: mirror removed. Uploading .zip version to be added to the random mirror script
  49. 1 point
    I would use this in the threators also . Its just that there exspensive .
  50. 1 point
    This is the first time I have ever been apart of one of these. I wouldnt mind doing it. How does it work? How much is shipping? THe Pope wouldnt mind reading it