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  1. 6 points
    Here's the complete collection of recordings I grabbed of the Odessa 1AESS switch before the cutover. The recordings were made during late may, with the last batch (A-D recordings) made on June 2, 2017 -- days before the cutover. The most interesting recordings I found during the calls to the switch: 1AESS-A.wav - Highest quality recording/best example I have of what a normal call to the 1AESS intercept sounded like. Allows you to hear the background SIT-tone noise before recordings. 1AESS-D.wav - Highest quality recording/best example I have of what a normal call to the 1AESS supervision test sounded like. 1AESS-3.wav - Bizarre because the switch cut to busy after intercept, instead of cutting over to reorder like normal. 1AESS-11.wav - Bizarre because the call, without ring, goes to the 1AESS intercept recording for one cycle, then stops for 20 seconds, and returns the Hillsboro 4ESS '121-T!' recording. 1AESS-14.wav - Bizarre because the call, rings once, goes silent for 30 seconds, then returns the Hillsboro 4ESS '121-T!' recording. 1AESS-15.wav - Bizarre because the call, rings once, goes silent for 40 seconds, then returns a reorder. More descriptions on the other calls are available on the 1A_desc.txt file on the dropbox drive. https://www.dropbox.com/sh/xca3wwskn1mzwzt/AABJMpTS0XDL9NQQgiz4LVI4a?dl=0 Enjoy.
  2. 6 points
    Hi all, Been busy for a while and was distracted by other facets of life. Signed in today was reading some of the posts to see if anything major or interesting has happened and not much has changed as I expected (no offence). So it seems no harm there in being temporarily gone. Now as I was reading some of the posts and a reply to my "Everything is Assumed" thread I noticed I had been down rep to -6 so I checked the Binary Revolution forum index page where it has a list of where you were down repped and which it was in like each thread over a long past with no replies as to why...I in some ways don't care but was wondering has another spam bot got lose or some dumb-ass, or did I make a thread that offended some community and they say it and one of them joined and down repped me for that. Anyway I was also wondering if this had happened to anyone else as well. Thanks in advance for any replies.
  3. 5 points
    After reading your comment #4 I also got really annoyed. I agree with Berzerk on this. Correct me if I am wrong, but it seems you don't know the difference between petty theft and hacking. Here is what I consider the difference: HACKING - Taking a computer, and figuring out a way to bypass the password. Disseminating the contents of the drive to find the owner's name, address, and pictures of them to identify them. Being nice and installing programs to help them find their PC if they lose it again. VNC - (to view the system) An SSH server - (to help retrieve their files) An IP beacon - (To say when the PC is online and what the IP address is) [*]Returning the laptop to the owner. [*]Occasionally checking in on the PC to make sure the system is ok, and they didn't lose it again. (What a good citizen!!!) PETTY THEFT - Not using google to find a simple kiddie script. Being an idiot and telling everyone you are committing a crime.
  4. 4 points
    There's another number to that; 3438. If you're hitting a route that gives you g.729 (sorta ruins that catchy song), it's not a bad idea to try both a few times. Interestingly, the transcoding seems to come on after the C5 chirps; those (and sometimes some Australian sounding ring) are always clear as day. So now when I found this - I actually think I found it with radio_phreak, but when I did, I was about as excited as you can expect. But something wasn't quite right. If you do a RESPORG lookup on 3438/7, it comes back as using the MCI/0222 network. If you call the number directly terminating to the Malaysian destination (you'll find it with a bit of searching) over MCI though, it's end to end SS7. After trying a bunch of carriers with no success, the theory we wound up with is that they were re-originating via a third party country; likely Australia, to shave a few cents off termination charges. Interestingly, when you hop on a conference on that access number, it'll allow you the option to contact customer service for the company, which is based out of Denver. The route you get is _definitely_ not C5. For whatever it's worth, there was another number until semi-recently; 3439 that routed a little differently. Usually it was more likely to get a transcoded route, or other weird things - one route had 450 hertz ringback before the call went offhook quite a lot . But anyway, for whatever it's worth, during Hurricane Sandy it gave you an error recording from a Santera OCX. If I remember right, the other numbers worked fine though. One thing I've noticed is during that song they play for hold music, sometimes it likes to disconnect you in weird ways. The hold music in question passes some notes a few times that definitely sound like 2400 hertz, so I wonder if that has anything to do with it (maybe we should pay attention to the supervision status), or if it's just an apathetic operator hanging up on you. Incidentally, when the call tears down with 2600, you'll hear this curious reorder tone from the international gateway that sorta fades in and out. Based on this, I wonder if it's a type 1 EWSD: https://pastebin.com/q1dvEcVw . So this isn't exactly C5, but a while ago, I found some Axtel DMS logs on Scribd. No, seriously. You can see from there they have quite a few R2 trunks provisioned for end users: 142785363-switch-a.pdf . We were playing with this on the bridge a few months ago - something I sorta want to get into again at some point; a few people seemed pretty excited about it. There's one particular number, +52-818-114-1500 (on the AX2P42 trunk group; labeled STA_CATARINA_CALL_CENTER_PBX_R2. If you look at page 224, you'll see the trunk group type configuration for this and many others; there's a bunch of R2 trunks with generic labels) that will send a backwards 4 in MFC (780 + 1140 hertz)to the switch - indicating a network error when it messes up. Which it occasionally does. Dunno how or if these can be seized, but it seemed worth mentioning. Speaking of which, I don't have the number for this; I had the bright idea of putting it on the speed dial for a calling card and then letting it expire, but Russia has some sort of strange signaling - perhaps another R2 variant floating about in their network. This particular call I remember being to Siberia: weirdmfs.flac . A lot of their switches use whatever this is. It enables them to send vacant number conditions and such over their signaling network. All I do here besides try and hit some DTMF is whistle 2600 twice; once to seize the trunk, and another time to make the switch get all angry. The tones you hear are the standard R1 frequency set, but obviously an R1 trunk never barks MFs back at you. EDIT: Crap, I forgot about the Cuba stuff. From what I understand, Havana if no other place has a reasonably modern network of Alcatel gear. As for the fixed GSM terminals, there's some older documents on Cuban telecom infrastructure lying around. All of them seem to point towards the Cuban fixed network being very over capacity. That could have something to do with that particular addition. As for Paraguay, radio_phreak mentioned to me a while back a particular set of numbers that would route to C5 trunks over some carriers. I believe it was +595-528-222-xxx. Back to the C5 stuff though, does anybody know where we can find a protocol spec document for it? That'll probably help us with some of the oddities we've found on some of these trunk groups. Another EDIT: http://www.itu.int/rec/T-REC-Q.140-Q.180/en Holy shit, another EDIT: http://www.binrev.com/forums/index.php?/topic/47028-portugal/#comment-364799 portugal_c5.flac One (hopefully) last thing - for anybody looking for international credit, I've found http://www.call2.com to be pretty good for the most part. Most of their routes look to be resold MCI, the rates are reasonable, and it tends to be decent quality. It is a callback service though, so it can be a little clunky for a large number of calls like in a scan. DMS-10 loops can be a good way to make this a little less painful. I feel kinda gross giving out a plug like that, but given the relative obscurity of the service and the content of the thread, it seems appropriate.
  5. 4 points
    0800 890 595 is now a (quite rare) example of the equipment engaged tone. I haven't done much looking for interesting switching/signalling since the early 2000s. It's got more difficult now because most people and businesses in poor countries have jumped straight to GSM (+successors). Back then, it would (as radio_phreak notes) be much more productive to look in the provincial towns and cities of poor countries than in their main cities. My preferred method was to look online for hotels or businesses in those backwater areas, ideally finding their fax numbers, and call those. Much prefer bothering a fax machine than disturbing a person. Now-a-days you need to do this armed with the country's dialling plan (wikipedia usually has these) - and most of the numbers you find will be mobiles. Re Cuba, I can't reach the supposed second dialtone for the US base via +53 99. The state telco is marketing the "fija alternativa" service - ie a GSM-based fixed service - suggesting aged and interesting POTS equipment exists. Calling from here, it's evident that their international gateway is something not outrageously ancient, because it promptly returns an appropriate SS7 code for incorrect prefixes - eg +53 41 000000 returns the usual SIT+"the number you have dialled has not been recognised" from my local exchange. +53 xx 300000 returns a Cuban intercept - in Spanish then English - after about 5 seconds of delay, where XX is any of the 2-digit areacodes listed at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telephone_numbers_in_Cuba. Sadly no signalling sounds are evident during the delays - I think I've tried all of them. I had a quick look for hotels in Panama and all the phone numbers I found were +507 6xxx xxxxx - ie mobiles. However, again, I'm hopeful that downstream of the international gateway is something elderly and interesting. +507 900 0000 sometimes gives an intercept - Spanish only - mentioning C&W Panama, again with a significant post-dial delay. +507 800 0000 gives my local telco's equipment engaged tone. +507 811 1111 was answered by a human +507 700 0000 is a different Spanish intercept, with a longer post-dial delay. +507 600 0000 or 500 0000 give my local telco's SIT+number not recognised intercept. +507 400 0000 is the same intercept-after-delay as 900 0000. +507 300 0000 is yet another Spanish intercept, with delay. +507 200 0000 has a very long delay then something times out any my local telco plays SIT+"sorry, there is a fault". +507 210 0000 has a long delay then the 900 0000 intercept +507 220 0000 rings, again after a delay, and is answered by some sort of automated service - in Spanish. No signalling sounds or evident, for me, in any of the above :-(
  6. 4 points
    So I just logged into binrev using this: it automatically generates, stores, and types passwords and looks like a usb-keyboard to your computer. That's a at89c5131 dev-board, this mcu is pretty much an 8051 with usb hardware. I'm probably going to keep touching up the code a little before I start printing boards.
  7. 3 points
    If you dial extension 8411-8414 it will make the automated voice say "Lane ""1-4"" Most pharmacies dont have more than two lanes. So if youre there waiting for a script, dial ext 8413 to hear the voice on the loudspeaker say "lane 3" and watch the employees confusion. its hilarious.
  8. 3 points
    Long time lurker.... registered recently..... first post... I know this thread is a bit old, figured I could be of some assistance here: Auto-scanned the 630713XXXX exchange (Took about ~15 hours), then did some manual checking: Number Auto-Scan Result Manual Scan, Comments 6307130025 VOICE Voicemail 6307130027 VOICE Subscriber 6307130107 VOICE Voicemail 6307130138 VOICE Voicemail (Nokia) 6307130460 VOICE UMTS Operations Support Group (Nokia -- "Please try again in 15 minutes") 6307130484 VOICE "We're sorry, but the blackout period for the transtition of the 401k record keeper is in effect on January 6th, please call back on January 7th." Repeats, then hangs up. 6307130563 VOICE Subscriber 6307130760 VOICE "Thank you for calling the Nokia workplace resources call center." 6307130869 VOICE Voicemail 6307130990 VOICE Voicemail Access Number, with working directory. 6307130996 VOICE Voicemail Access Number, with working directory. 6307131006 VOICE Subscriber 6307131229 VOICE Subscriber 6307131265 VOICE "Sorry, this automated attendant number is not available at the moment, goodbye." 6307131292 VOICE Subscriber 6307131304 VOICE "The called extension is busy" >> Voicemail 6307131329 VOICE Subscriber 6307131335 VOICE Ring >> Reorder 6307131553 VOICE Voicemail 6307131984 FAX Fax tones 6307132349 FAX Fax tones 6307133200 VOICE Voicemail Access Number, with working directory. 6307133678 FAX Possibly a modem. 6307134150 VOICE Subscriber 6307134389 VOICE Subscriber 6307134433 VOICE Voicemail 6307134484 VOICE Subscriber 6307134633 VOICE Voicemail 6307134967 VOICE Voicemail 6307135012 VOICE Voicemail 6307135163 VOICE Voicemail (reads back extension number) 6307135305 FAX Possibly a modem. 6307135353 VOICE Voicemail 6307135400 VOICE Voicemail 6307136056 FAX Fax tones 6307136081 FAX Fax tones 6307136082 FAX Fax tones 6307136091 VOICE Possibly an elevator?? Buzzing/Static on line. Hangs up with #. 6307136153 VOICE Another elevator phone? Hangs up with # again. 6307137073 VOICE Subscriber 6307137163 VOICE Voicemail 6307137180 VOICE Voicemail 6307137339 VOICE Subscriber 6307138416 VOICE Subscriber 6307138507 VOICE Voicemail 6307138668 VOICE Voicemail 6307138761 VOICE Voicemail 6307139039 VOICE Voicemail 6307139328 VOICE Voicemail 6307139379 VOICE Subscriber 6307139650 VOICE Voicemail 6307139764 VOICE Voicemail 6307139885 VOICE Subscriber 6307139988 VOICE Voicemail If there's any interest I can run a scan on 630979XXXX.
  9. 3 points
    So all credit goes to Ramsaso; he pointed this out on the bridge last night. If you have a T-Mobile phone, try calling 712-451-0011. You should get a recording saying they now charge 1 cent a minute to call it, even if you're on their unlimited plan.
  10. 3 points
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Debian
  11. 3 points
    I got this bag phone last month and was playing around with it to see if there was some tiny chance that it could connect to any network. As I suspected, there aren't any crumbling remains of AMPS networks anywhere near me. An interesting feature about this phone is there's an "Aux Out" which apparently was for sending faxes. Can't imagine lugging all of that around and plugging everything into the 12v jack in your car...
  12. 3 points
    This is just a beginning to get people started. Feel free to add onto more if you wish. The 'Threads' links you will see are from threads from these forums where the topic has been discussed before. I wrote this a few months ago so there may even be more threads about them if you search around. This list was made from numerous threads about the same topics; to stop the bitching from the Department of Redundancy Department. 1. How do I use exploits? ::Discussions - 1. ::Programs for assistance - Nmap and Nessus. ::Reference material - Security Focus, and Irongeek. 2. How do I get the admin password for Windows XP? ::Discussions - 1. ::Programs for assistance - Login recovery, and John the Ripper. ::Reference material - Password Recovery, Irongeek.com, and many others. I would suggest reading the discussion thread. 3. How do I hack a website? ::Discussions - 1 , 2, 3. 4. How do I get around web filtering like Websense? ::Discussions - 1, 2, 3. ::Programs for assistance - It is probally easier to use a proxy to get around web filtering software. ::Reference material - Babelfish, Proxy Blind, and Proxify. 5. What are proxies and how do they work? ::Discussions - 1, 2. ::Programs for assistance - There are tons of proxy server lists out there. Suggest doing a Google search for "Proxy", "Proxies", "Proxy Server", etc. ::Reference material - Wiki Proxy Info. 6. Where can I find more Hacker media like HackTV or BRR? For general Hacker Media information check out the Forums. ::Reference material - Hackermedia, Infonomicon, Old Skool Phreak, WhiteSword TV, Packet Sniffers, Hak5. 7. What are some good books to read that will teach me about hacking? This all depends on what you are interested in learning. ::Reference material - Cryptography, Programming, Networking, and Social Engineering. 8. Where can I find a meeting to attend, and what if no one is in my area? If no one is in your area then start up your own meeting, and let others know about it! ::Reference material - Bin Rev meetings - BRR listeners map, DefCon groups, 2600 meetings, and also search for a LUG (Linux User Group) in your area. 9. What Linux distro is the best? ::Discussions - 1. ::Reference material - Rundown on different distros, a test that may help you decide which is best for you, and you may also want to check out more distros' for yourself. 10. How do I learn how to hack? ::Discussions - 1, 2. 11. I want to program, where should I start? ::Discussions - 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22. C Book, Tutorial, Windows Compiler, *nix Compiler, *nix Compiler How-To. Python Website, Book, Tutorial, Compiler, Compiler How-To.
  13. 3 points
    Hey Samo! Good to hear from you again. Sorry to give you a wall of text here, there's really no concise way to explain this. In short, if you want to explore a long distance tandem, your best bet is to use a PIC code. There's a very simple trick that lets you push any destination you want directly into the tandem. We'll use Worldcom as an example, since it works from basically anywhere in the United States. Ready? Dial 101-0555. That's it; no zero, nothing. What you get next is a dialtone straight from the tandem. In the case of the ex-Worldcom tandems, it's not quite as fun as it could be; it wants an authorization code a-la 950 calling card. Here's an example of what you might find - http://thoughtphreak..._800223110.flac That's from a DMS (500, I think) owned by Integra, one of the local CLECs. Most long distance tandems (AT&T's aside - we'll get into that in a bit) don't like terminating toll-free calls, so you'll end up getting weird messages that you'll never be able to hear normally unless your switch loses it's mind. What's so great about this is you're completely free from the dialing restrictions of a normal end office. Want to dial an NXX starting with 1 or 0? A code starting with #? *? There's nothing standing in your way. Sprint in particular stuck a speed dial function on their tandem for some weird reason in the #xx range. #99+anything seems to be it's own little exception - it'll wait for a very large amount of digits before eventually giving you a generic CBCAE recording. This might indicate they're hiding something else here. There's one downside to this technique; if you're not subscribed to a carrier, they won't always let you play with the tandem. ex-MCI (0222) and Sprint are a couple good examples of this, but Sprint will give you a cool message as a consolation prize. Depending on your area, you might have better luck too. For example, the Qwest long distance network has a combination of DMS-250 and Sonus switches. Sonus isn't fond of letting people have fun on the phone, so you'll just get a generic error recording. If you encounter Global Crossing's Sonus switches, you won't even get a custom recording, you'll get the Sonus stock one. It's worth a laugh if you ever hear it. It's under three seconds, and was clearly made last minute by an engineer. Speaking of Global Crossing, like MCI/0222, they have a number of Alcatel DEX switches floating around. Dialing 101-0444 will just get you an error, though. The solution? 950-1044! What dialplan they're using is absolutely beyond me, though, so you're on your own there. There's suggestions - like 800-223-1104 (but only without a 1) going to an invalid code recording that suggest it might be for calling card use, but most things I can think to try just go to a CBCAD. And then we come to AT&T's 0288 network. I'll level with you, this is something I haven't figured out at all. Whenever I've been fortunate to get a dialtone back, it's always been from one of their 5ESS toll tandems. If there's such thing as a pushy phone switch, this is it. It'll let you know right away if it thinks you're doing something wrong. And putting a 1 in front of your destination number is wrong. I haven't had time or an opportunity to just sit down and investigate this, but what I do know is it's unique from a lot of other switches. For one, it'll terminate toll-free calls, but only on specific carriers. I believe just AT&T and Global Crossing toll-frees. Sometimes, it gets a little weirder - like, if you dial 800-244-1111, you'll get a recording from a McLeodUSA DMS. What this means I'm not sure exactly, but my guess is since the 5E toll tandems are responsible for lending a hand in connecting toll-frees, they'll store translations for those toll-frees. If it happens to have one - outdated or not, it'll just use that instead of doing an SMS-800 dip. Also of note on the AT&T tandems is the 600 NPA. Instead of just intercepting it like any invalid NPA, it'll pass this onto the 4ESS. This might indicate AT&T stashed something in there. As for your question - is SS7 relevant to phreaks? Absolutely. The very core practice of phreaking - introducing unorthodox input into the phone network - is fair game to everything, in or out of the speech channel. In the past, we've proved ISDN cause codes can trigger calls to take a different route, and it's been demonstrated that originating a ghost call (in short, an ANI fail on steroids - a call originated with no field other than the destination number) can be enough trouble that phone companies would probably scratch their heads as to whom they should send the bill to. It's understandable that figuring these things out is a challenge, but if anything, that should be a motivator. We're phone phreaks, we've got the resourcefulness to identify a piece of telco hardware by nothing more than vague sounds, and have fun in the process. This should be a reminder that there's always more to explore, and always another limit to break.
  14. 3 points
    It's a mindset. You hack to learn, you don't learn to hack.
  15. 3 points
    That sounds like a lot of work! Can I just send you my bank account numbers and social and have you help me out?
  16. 3 points
    Not to stir shit up, but I certainly agree that this forum shouldn't be a place where fake accounts come along and post allegations which result in people being terminated from their employment. If "unlucky" was indeed the victim of a violation of his privacy by an employee of trapcall/spoofcard then he should have contacted them. Also, if Lucky was fired without any evidence of a particular account being accessed by an employee, then he worked for a piece of shit company. If I were a mod, i would have deleted this thread because even if the allegations were true, there was not a shred of evidence provided, and I do not believe that this is a place for such things. perhaps if "unlucky" simply voiced a concern over the privacy expectations when dealing with a particular service, but he didn't - he made an accusation directed at one man, without anything to back it up. That being said, it's probably all true. ...seriously.
  17. 3 points
    Stop paying for tv service Look into "FTA" or "FTA Receivers" Etc. Just read up on the "Free to Air broadcasts" You just buy a receiver, point your satellite at the orbiting satellite and you can get over 1,000 channels Free.
  18. 3 points
    SCO doesn't own UNIX, at least not yet. The actual "ownership" and copyright to UNIX is a very complicated issue. All this court decision did was "reverse material aspects" of the earlier verdict from 2007 that found Novell to be the rightful copyright owner. Now there's going to be yet another trial case to determine whether SCO does in fact own the copyright. I don't think anybody seriously gives a shit about System V UNIX, UnixWare or any of SCO's other crappy, outdated products. But a company like SCO, which has been in bankruptcy for over 2 years, has virtually no market share and appears to exist these days only for the purpose of suing other companies, might well gain legal ownership of the original System V UNIX code. In other words: they might gain a legal "leg to stand on" and cause more trouble for OSS creators and vendors. For years, SCO has been bitching that Linux infringes on a copyright for the original UNIX code that it assumes it holds. They have sued companies like IBM and Novell which produce Linux-based software and distribute Linux as an OEM OS. They have disseminated propaganda to Linux users, accusing them of copyright infringement and alleging they could be liable for damages simply by running Linux. They have sued their own (former) customers who switched from using their products to using Linux. SCO is also known to have received financial backing from other, far more powerful interests whose goal is to ruin the open source software movement by any means possible. At this point, SCO clearly has nothing to lose, and Microsoft doesn't have to dirty their hands or risk hurting their own public image by attacking open source developers in court. Microsoft can just sit back and bash the OSS movement in the press, allege IP infringements, negotiate cross-licensing agreements and provide financial support to companies like SCO to file anti-OSS suits. This may not be a potent threat to the very existence of Linux, but it could definitely harm Linux in the business market and lead to some very bad precedents regarding OSS and software copyright/patents in general. BTW, I'm not the one who voted down your post. It's an interesting bit of news on a case I haven't really followed in awhile. Thanks for posting it.
  19. 3 points
    The above is the 'offical' Postal Regulation for an IBI or Information Based Indicia. All this information is contained in the 2-D barcode to the upper left of a piece of metered mail. Look at some of your junk mail and it will be very clear what I mean. It's that box that looks like Lattera's avatar. The column that says barcode are all of the data items in that 2-D barcode that I'm talking about and the Human Readable is what you can decipher when you look at it...date, time, etc. The information is digitally signed so that when the Post Office reads the mail it can be fairly certain that it came from a particular licensed meter. What's crazy is that the meter internally communicates with 'itself' using an asymetric key system...public/private. That is the meter contains a postal security device which is tamper resistant (of course resistance is a relative term) that sends out commands to create and sign the indicia with all the signals being encrypted. Think of it like an HTTPS setup for internal communications or more appropriately like each command being digitally signed. Digital signatures use the public/private key system so this is closer to what is happening. The whole postage meter industry is so wacky. What I mean is that to actually attack the meter directly is incredibly hard but not impossible;however, there are far easier ways to 'hack' a meter. The meter itself and access thereof is fairly easy due to primitive security. If you have physical control of a meter and a system that can interface with it you can do pretty much whatever you want. But not to be too much of a worry wort...printing postage is printing money; stamps are a legal form of tender so if you play games with this stuff the penalties are insanely harsh because of that. I know some smartass is saying to himself, "Oh then I can use it to buy my groceries?" Not exactly...unclaimed stamps can and must be refunded by the post office. If you show up with a stamp that is legally yours or if you can 'somehow' prove that that is a stamp of yours the post office refunds the amount on the stamp. Of course it isn't an immediate refund. You can't just show up with a meter label for a hundred bucks and walk away with a c-note.
  20. 3 points
    Ohm, you obviously get off on policing binrev. Seriously, I've seen you crush countless topics with your sense of superior morality. The only thing that impresses me about you is that you always find some way to condescend. You've got a real talent.
  21. 3 points
    Clearly the best was Windows 95. Don't you miss 3 reboots a day? As for XP, it was received pretty badly at first. Pre-SP1, XP was quite buggy. Also, for the time it was resource heavy, so a lot of people complained they couldn't run it on their current machines. I always got a chuckle when people bashed Vista, yet praised XP which had similar problems at the start. Of course people were willing to bite the bullet since the alternative was Windows 98 (or for the enlightened few, Windows 2000). Now, you have XP which works and is stable, so you can sit back and poo Vista all you want. I've also had no problems with Vista. If you have a fast enough machine, there's just not much to complain about. It works, what more do you want? As long as you're listing future OSs, why not list Ubuntu 9.10?
  22. 3 points
    Great link. Who wants to mirror this and stick up a torrent?
  23. 2 points
    I just googled that and guess what: https://int3.cc/products/usbcondoms haha It doesn't say in the description that it prevents your phone from frying, but logically that's the first device to fry...
  24. 2 points
    Changes of FCC regulation, lack of market demand and general obsolescence. In 2008 when the FCC modified rules to make AMPS carriage optional, most telcos were really quick to get rid of their AMPS services. There wasn't as much money to be had in SCPC AMPS services as there is in multiplex digital services. Funny thing though, depending where you are, if you are lucky enough you can sometimes find very small private (corporate?) AMPS base stations still in place. Usually corporate internal PBX patches I think. A friend and I came across one on a Moto brick fone a couple years ago that we believe was either at Boeing (Gresham, Ore.) or Wafertech (Camas, Wash.). What you can do with it (if anything) depends how the host PBX is configured, how big the company is and how far abandoned-in-place the base is. You'd probably stand a better chance of finding one at a huge multi/national headquarters or field office than a smaller local or regional-based company.
  25. 2 points
    Time to bring a dead thread back to life. So I got a Tandem server and its 100% functional, I got it for a old data conversion project. Anyone got any clue where to get MM. If we can get a copy of MM, Ill setup a modem on the server and then we can figure out how to free our millenniums from the MM Borge Hive.
  26. 2 points
    Likely going to be my first miss. I am just so out of the scene that I really do not have much desire to go to these anymore. They are just scenes now... or I turned into a jaded old man. Possibly both.
  27. 2 points
    Point of Interconnect. I think the basic idea is like if you have a switch that serves a large number of ratecenters, you'll need a trunk group from it to the tandem switch serving it. So let's say for example you've got a switch in Washington DC or wherever, but you want to plug in a bunch of channel banks and give dialtone to random people in the Blue Ridge mountains. You can totally run some cable down there and do it, but the problem is, your switch homes off the intra-LATA tandem in DC as it should. To accomadate the local calling area of everyone you're going to serve, you also need to get some trunks to the intra-LATA tandem in, say, Culpeper, and establish an exchange for them to be reached on/to reach the other local exchanges. When you're doing that, you're not allocating it to the switch, but to a point of interconnect between you and the Culpeper tandem, and the CLLI code will reflect that. Because regulatory regimes are stupid, you can't legally (to my knowledge) give free local calls from your DC subscribers to the Culpeper area even though you have trunks to it from your switch; they have to use a long distance provider to dial that. Coin and operator calls are a little more of a grey area. I know from Portland, they have trunks from TOPS to the Salem tandem, and you'd hit that trunk group making ACTS calls. I dunno what those trunks were considered legally, but you could theoretically set up an automatic operator IVR to get around that restriction. That's how I understand it anyway. Can someone who has more of a clue about this chime in?
  28. 2 points
    From a business/regulatory standpoint, I'm pretty sure that your local phone company and local operator is never your long distance company. Sure, you might have AT&T for your local phone and as your LD company, but the local and LD divisions are two separate companies. As such, when you dial 0 and get your local operator, they can only help you with calls inside your LATA. When you wanted something outside of your LATA, they connected you to MCI, which I'm guessing is your pre-subscribed LD carrier. You could check by dialing 1-700-555-4141. Your phone number is passed to the operator so they can easily know if you're trying to have them dial something out of your LATA. Only your area code is sent when you op-divert, but all the information necessary to identify you is available to the operator; it just doesn't get sent out.
  29. 2 points
    I just use my POTS line for the most part. Occasionally, calling cards too for international. They're ideal for that sort of thing since a lot of CO numbers don't go offhook. Finding them in the first place might well end up costing you more money then the actual scan.
  30. 2 points
    If you use this stuff, consider the time of day. The switcher will probably be upset if his phone rings several times in the night, keep that in mind if you decide to dial around/scanning. Some of the CNET switchers don't mind scanning around. Some do. It's like hunting on someone's land without their permission. They might be fine with it, but if they aren't, make sure you act right.
  31. 2 points
    http://www.digitalbond.com/blog/2013/10/22/call-yourself-a-hacker-lose-your-4th-amendment-rights/ Apparently saying that you like hacking on things without specifying "things" means you're automatically assumed to be compromising systems and that you're going to destroy evidence so they might as well take all of your equipment preemptively. So I guess hacking together a high water sensor for the basement, since I'm calling it "hacking," means I'll destroy evidence in legal investigations and that I like to break into systems I don't own all the time. Bullshit.
  32. 2 points
    Just the usual scanning routine. My guess would be it's in one of those 00xx ranges. 818-907-0037 gave me one of the recordings on your switch, but that range (and the rest, sadly) seem to be crowded with a lot of people. If you just want to go all out and scan the hell out of it, I'd either do a search for the numbers as you're scanning or do it during business hours when people are working again to avoid them. Do you get that AIS we talked about when you make dialing errors or call out of region toll-free numbers and stuff? I'm not sure what's up with that prefix, but it'd be cool to establish that you're actually being served by the DMS-10 first . EDIT: I don't know a whole lot about DMS-10s, but there's one in the Evan Doorbell Permanent Signal tape. Some of them seem to have a weird sounding offhook tone.
  33. 2 points
    Here's some random stuff: 800-877-1645 - Weird IVR 412-223-0000 - rec, "This file is reserved for Core Tel internal use. Thank you." 770-528-0010 - rec, "We're sorry, storm damage in this area has blocked your call. Emergency calls may be placed through your operator." 770-528-0028 - rec, "We're sorry, touch-star service cannot be used to call this number, trace this number, or enter this number on your list." 541-384-0126 - Ringout to VMB, "This is the TDS Telecom Condon, Oregon Calnet line. Please leave a message." 775-825-0036 - Thingie on POTS line w/weirdly edited together Pat Fleet prompt, "Enter access code" 206-367-0020 - rec, "You have reached the Emerson 5ESS office. The CLLI is STTLWA04DS0." 866-826-4867, extension 6904 - Room monitor at a college with a strange Ericsson PBX. Some nights, you'll hear music and drunk people nearby. 845-425-9929 - rec, "You are calling a number on your partyline. Please hang up and wait for the phone to stop ringing. Then pick up and your party will be there." 603-296-9120 - Phrase administration IVR (ETC Digicept or similar AIS) I think the only bridge I've ever heard not supe was a loop on a DMS-10 in Iowa. Unfortunately, it was also limited to thirty second or so before it'd mute you. I'll see if I can dig it up sometime. EDIT: The Metaswitch voicemail for the TDS Calnet thingie was replaced by an Innovative Systems AP for some reason, and currently has no greeting. So to make up for that, 541-384-0101 is one of those weird EWSD milliwatts that accepts DTMF when the tone goes away.
  34. 2 points
    I was just talking to my boy RPM about doing something like this. I have a few numbers I will edit this post and add shortly.
  35. 2 points
    Hey guys, I recently signed up for an AMD Embedded Developer account and have access to all sorts of tfiles for the Embedded G-Series Processors and SoCs, as well as the R-Series Processors. I've been looking to develop a board around these things for a while. I need someone who has the ability to help me through the process (both physics and design) and is willing to do so without financial compensation (well, unless I decide to start selling these boards for multipurpose stuffs, then there will be percentages involved). Now, all of these things are very closed source and I signed maybe four too many non disclosure agreements. And they can very much make lawsuits against me, so anyone who is going to be working with me must also be able to obtain access to the files. This is a link to the developer registration. The process shouldn't be too hard, given I (at 17 years old) signed up and got approved. It took an overnight approval process, but other than that, there were no hiccups. (Also, within 15 minutes I was declined, then in the morning I was approved, so I don't know what's going on there, just try it if you are interested).
  36. 2 points
    IDK about DDR2 and DDR3 compatibility, and am too lazy too google it right now. Just thought I'd add my 2 cents on liquid cooling. I'd not recommend it, unless you're gonna do some serious overclocking and need it. IMO, the more complicated stuff is, the less reliable it is. I've overclocked a 2.8 Q9550 to 3.5GHZ (pics were in the gallery) and it was stable as heck. That was with and nVidia chipset, that was known to run extra hot, too. Of course with the two 250mm side-fans, two internal 120mm fans, and a third-party zalman heatsink/fan it sounds like small vacuum when running full throttle on hot summer days.... EDIT: thermal compound; I've yet to find anything affordable as good as arctic silver 5. A small tube for about $20.00 will last 10 or so builds. Just be sure to learn to apply it properly! I've seen so many people that just splurge, thinking extra compound will work better. When in fact, too much, will actually insulate the CPU. Put about the size of a grain of rice on the heatsink. Then spread it evenly with a razor blade or exacto knife. The coat should be thin and even across the entire copper placement of the heatsink. You could put it on the CPU, but I just hate handling them too much, as pricey as the damn things are... The heatsinnk can usually withstand a static discharge that would fry the CPU. You could also use rubber, medical gloves to spread it with your fingers. Just don't touch the heatsink copper placement or cpu with bare hands, though. I've read the oils from human contact will degrade the compound prematurely...
  37. 2 points
    The network is obviously not yours, and you do not have authorized use over it, so yes it is still illegal. I seriously doubt anyone will give you the response you are looking for. I suggest forgetting about the prank and to make out with as many high school chicks as you can while you are young, and that is still legal.
  38. 2 points
    Hello all, I've just released a new paper called, "Building wireless IDS systems using open source". The idea is to detect network level attacks using software like Snort, and layer 2 (wireless level) attacks using Kismet. Sagan brings it all together. Please check it out and let me know what you think. That article is at: http://sagan.softwink.com/papers/wireless-ids Thanks!
  39. 2 points
    The MetaSploit team released a vulnerable VM to own. http://blog.metasploit.com/2010/05/introducing-metasploitable.html
  40. 2 points
    In case the list breaks: http://rapidshare.com/files/366334463/docs.zip.html All documents from the big package, zipped. This is probably the part you'll all find most interesting. http://rapidshare.com/files/366341857/5.7.8.1.44__dominos_build_.zip.html Custom 5.7 build used by Dominos Pizza http://rapidshare.com/files/366341861/Client_5.7.1I_SP8c_Installer.zip.html Client for 5.7.1 isp8c (client speaks to pro or server install over network) http://rapidshare.com/files/366341862/config_disk.zip.html Config disk with numerous test accounts, works in all versions posted. Just extract files into the install folder, overwriting files as necessary. http://rapidshare.com/files/366341863/PCCWClient_5.8.0.exe.html Client for 5.8.0 http://rapidshare.com/files/366341866/Pro_5.7.1I_SP9a_Installer.zip.html Pro 5.7.1 isp9a, minor bugfixes from isp8c http://rapidshare.com/files/366345809/Tarja2.exe.html Internal use keygen for pre-5.8 versions. Apparently one of the devs has a hardon for Finnish symphonic rock singers. http://rapidshare.com/files/366350414/Pro_5.8.0_Installer.zip Pro 5.8.0 Installer http://rapidshare.com/files/366350418/PS_5.8.0_Setup.exe Payment Server 5.8.0 Installer http://rapidshare.com/files/366350420/Server_5.7.1I_SP8c_Installer.zip Payment Server 5.7.1 isp8c installer
  41. 2 points
    It sounds like you have a problem with capitalism, which is fine, but cracking one of its manifestations isn't going to to do much as a retort. I don't see any other reason to attack any particular company. You might also want to consider that this company wouldn't be in business if there weren't a demand (created arbitrarily is another issue) for such a game. Any particular company fulfilling this niche is arbitrary. You want to attack a placeholder? I think your fight is better directed at capitalism. You want to change patterns of demand? I think you want to fight human nature (aka culture?). You want to do either of those things? I think you're wasting your time. MT
  42. 2 points
    he was saying that linux is not lightweight anymore if you pick any main distro, redhat, debian, ubuntu, gentoo, slackware, knoppix, mandrake, in most peoples experience it uses about the same amount of ram/cycles as windows e.g. just as slow just as bloated as windows(of course just to be able to run kde-gnome to get the standard apps). it just doesn't run as many different types of hardware. i've never met some one that couldnt get a windows computer running, just as i've never seen any distro/nix work just as good as windows on any computer ive ever used. its less efficient in i dont have to research every single piece of hardware going in my computer to see if it works, if it doesnt work then i have to see if i have to compile a custom krnl32.exe/krnl64.exe to get it to work properly. i dont have to research and try every single up date to make sure it doesn't break a driver/linux on my computer. most people have problems with drivers probably 70-80%+ have had a problem with some hardware using linux.
  43. 2 points
    Lots of old books (copyright expired) about analog electronics, amateur radio, telephones, etc.: Technical Books Online
  44. 2 points
    North Korea my ass! They're barely building nukes. Rockafeller's Cyber Security Act of 2009 is right around the corner from being presented in congress. Think out side the box people, it doesn't hurt every once in a while. http://www.opencongress.org/articles/view/961-The-Cybersecurity-Act
  45. 2 points
    Here it is /with/ the text:
  46. 2 points
    .........what? Basically, the launch os of Android (Not Cupcake) had a missed typed redirect in the code, where anything typed on the G1 would be echoed to a bash session's stdin. So typing reboot would reboot, typing ls would list the current directory, typing sshd would start a sshd session, all with root privileges. It was an (very stupid) exploit that allowed full access to the linux underpinnings of Android on the G1, even allowing people to install a full version of Debian.
  47. 2 points
    That is very sad... Peopel don't realize how much work it takes to run a site like that. I really liked milw0rm a lot.
  48. 2 points
    Sorry, just gotta point some stuff out here. He was the first to unlock the iPhone. It was a hardware unlock. It all started from there. Also, he is currently not part of the dev team. They occasionally share some info here and there, but he either was never part of the team, or was booted. Not sure which :-/ There's some tension, but they respect each other's skills. Geohot apparently felt like using the undisclosed exploit to make his own tool before 3.1 went mainstream. It appears as though the Dev-Team should be making the tools though Speaking of which, some guy in Iran found an injection vector in the AT+XLOG command to inject the 24kpwn exploit used to unlock the baseband. Yay!
  49. 2 points
    NOOOO dont format it do a Chkdsk and then a FixMBR then a Fixboot. should fix it, or if not do a 2nd repair on it. which is basically installing windows over again, your stuff will be there but it needs to be reinstalled anyway.
  50. 2 points