Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/18/2017 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Long time lurker.... registered recently..... first post... I know this thread is a bit old, figured I could be of some assistance here: Auto-scanned the 630713XXXX exchange (Took about ~15 hours), then did some manual checking: Number Auto-Scan Result Manual Scan, Comments 6307130025 VOICE Voicemail 6307130027 VOICE Subscriber 6307130107 VOICE Voicemail 6307130138 VOICE Voicemail (Nokia) 6307130460 VOICE UMTS Operations Support Group (Nokia -- "Please try again in 15 minutes") 6307130484 VOICE "We're sorry, but the blackout period for the transtition of the 401k record keeper is in effect on January 6th, please call back on January 7th." Repeats, then hangs up. 6307130563 VOICE Subscriber 6307130760 VOICE "Thank you for calling the Nokia workplace resources call center." 6307130869 VOICE Voicemail 6307130990 VOICE Voicemail Access Number, with working directory. 6307130996 VOICE Voicemail Access Number, with working directory. 6307131006 VOICE Subscriber 6307131229 VOICE Subscriber 6307131265 VOICE "Sorry, this automated attendant number is not available at the moment, goodbye." 6307131292 VOICE Subscriber 6307131304 VOICE "The called extension is busy" >> Voicemail 6307131329 VOICE Subscriber 6307131335 VOICE Ring >> Reorder 6307131553 VOICE Voicemail 6307131984 FAX Fax tones 6307132349 FAX Fax tones 6307133200 VOICE Voicemail Access Number, with working directory. 6307133678 FAX Possibly a modem. 6307134150 VOICE Subscriber 6307134389 VOICE Subscriber 6307134433 VOICE Voicemail 6307134484 VOICE Subscriber 6307134633 VOICE Voicemail 6307134967 VOICE Voicemail 6307135012 VOICE Voicemail 6307135163 VOICE Voicemail (reads back extension number) 6307135305 FAX Possibly a modem. 6307135353 VOICE Voicemail 6307135400 VOICE Voicemail 6307136056 FAX Fax tones 6307136081 FAX Fax tones 6307136082 FAX Fax tones 6307136091 VOICE Possibly an elevator?? Buzzing/Static on line. Hangs up with #. 6307136153 VOICE Another elevator phone? Hangs up with # again. 6307137073 VOICE Subscriber 6307137163 VOICE Voicemail 6307137180 VOICE Voicemail 6307137339 VOICE Subscriber 6307138416 VOICE Subscriber 6307138507 VOICE Voicemail 6307138668 VOICE Voicemail 6307138761 VOICE Voicemail 6307139039 VOICE Voicemail 6307139328 VOICE Voicemail 6307139379 VOICE Subscriber 6307139650 VOICE Voicemail 6307139764 VOICE Voicemail 6307139885 VOICE Subscriber 6307139988 VOICE Voicemail If there's any interest I can run a scan on 630979XXXX.
  2. 2 points
    Yeah, if you're looking at old scan textfiles then a carrier is a modem carrier. You can identify them by their metal screeching though you should find recordings to differentiate between a fax carrier and a modem carrier signal. You could connect to them over voip, I think, using a terminal program like Term90 or HyperTerminal. Okay, okay, I don't know offhand of any modern dial-up terminal programs. Guess I should research that. Might be a ton of BBSes under my nose and me without a trusty US Robotics.
  3. 1 point
    So today, I was thinking about a few people I'd talked to recently - they told me they were into the idea of scanning, but because of their lack of free time/direction, it was hard to find space in their lives for this sort of thing. So I was thinking; should I build a thing with my Dialogic box that automatically dials ranges that look potentially fun, and let people review the recordings/manually make a description of what's actually on the line? There could be a rough level of signal detection using the DSP; enough to let you search by what you'd like to see most; whether it be recordings, VMBs, modems or dialtones or whatever, and let you select by region or operating company. Maybe some more powerful signal detection could be tacked on at a later point that could recognize certain manufacturers or switch types. This would be a pretty significant undertaking, so I'd like to know if anybody is interested before I actually do this. If you don't actively scan and would like to, would this help turn the tide for you a little?
  4. 1 point
    For anybody else interested in ASA, here's a copy: http://www87.zippyshare.com/v/5KLQq8cL/file.html https://openload.co/f/Vmg1F004bdM/siteadmin.zip I think the command to grab the translations from the Definity to a computer is 'upload translations'. I'm honestly a little confused; I've never seen it barf out something blank like that before. If you could try again, that'd be great; there's a checksum for like every block in the xmodem protocol, so there's no chance of it uploading something it shouldn't. Well, not without Hyperterminal (or the Definity) raising a huge stink anyway. No worries! It might be a while before I can get a normal machine to run this with (the machine that currently runs my Dialogic code gets pretty frequent use right now, and being headless, it's hardly a normal install case) though, so let me know if you want me to just help you remotely for now. I know enough by memory to get it working for that and improvise the rest. For starts, you'll need a Dialogic card. This is the particular model I have. It's cheap and works with normal POTS stations. Occasionally you'll see them go for a little cheaper on eBay, but this is pretty good: http://www.ebay.com/itm/D41JCTLSW-Dialogic-4-Port-Analog-Loop-Start-PCI-SP-Voice-Interface-Card-/272816283916?epid=1656832384&hash=item3f851e210c:g:K98AAOSw4DJYf22m . It's about a foot long, so finding a machine it physically fits in (most off the shelf ATX machines will do) is going to be your biggest bottleneck. Any Pentium 3 (or later 2)-era thrift store/yard sale/dumpster machine with 256 or so MB RAM will run the software perfectly fine. After booting the install CD, keep in mind it'll overwrite your hard disk without asking too. Once it boots, you may need to set the root password and start up an SSH server (beware that leaving any system running a Linux distro this old on the public internet is an extreme liability. Since it was convenient, I was using a dial-up modem to run mine for a while) before installing the Audix software packages. If you need any help with that, just let me know. That's right; the formatting stuff the Definity spits out with the dump isn't part of what's in RAM. But by pasting all that in a hex editor, you're converting ASCII to hex data, though. The RAM location with the passwords changes with each build. My way of figuring out where is to just search for the string 'inads' until I find what looks like passwords. From the TCM shell (which I *think* exists in release 6. At least, there's a TCM process. I don't think you can type 'go tcm' until 7 or 8 though), you can get a fairly solid example from the Definity itself of what the location with passwords looks like: That's a good question - I don't think the keys are necessarily in the RAM, but the program that validates them definitely is. I honestly don't have any idea how to do it. EDIT: Here's some cheaper Dialogic cards. Like I said, they go for peanuts: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Dialogic-D-41JCT-LS-4-port-Combined-Media-Board-Voice-Interface-Card-/263201498830?epid=86074960&hash=item3d480826ce:g:AZoAAOSwZr9ZtxdD http://www.ebay.com/itm/DIALOGIC-4-PORT-ANALOG-VOICE-FAX-COMBINED-MEDIA-BOARD-D-41JCT-LS-/162099670042?epid=86074960&hash=item25bde4ac1a:g:PVIAAOSwbwlXCsoz http://www.ebay.com/itm/Dialogic-D-41JCT-LS-Combined-Media-Board-Voice-Interface-Card-/332385891932?epid=86074960&hash=item4d63be365c:g:sm4AAOSwo4pYCRGh It's a little strange; these go for like, $5,000 brand new, and some of them weren't even opened. From the auction descriptions, it sounds like some people are mistaking these for dial-up modems. If you're willing to go through the trouble to develop software for them, it's a ridiculously good deal. There's also another card you can occasionally find that's smaller and should be runnable using the same API. I haven't tested it, but if anybody wants to give it a try, here's one: http://www.ebay.com/itm/DIALOGIC-D-4PCIU-D4PCIUFW-44-0053-02-4-PORT-VOICE-FAS-MEDIA-PCI-E-CARD-/272741298914?epid=80086610&hash=item3f80a5f2e2:g:bPQAAOSwnK9ZVTr0
  5. 1 point
    No dice . Maybe! I wonder if a slow sweep tone or something would be in order. The pause/repeat thing sounds like it may be your long distance carrier changing routes. If you're okay with casual dialing (should be safe; I'd be sure, but I don't think it supes), try seeing if AT&T or MCI do the same. I'd be really disappointed if it was the case, but I was thinking this might just be the Nortel announcement card making that tone; they sometimes end calls with that same (or at least a similar) cause code. 706-219-0002 - Windstream NOC 434-223-6399 - Newer Otis elevator at university, on Meridian. 7200 is a Siemens elevator. 706-865 1112 - Ringout bridge 1113 - rec, "The number you have dialed is a party on your own line. Please hang up and allow the phone to ring several times before lifting the handset to talk." 1117 - Ringout 1118 - Ringout to Meatwitch VMB, Windstream Cleveland CO 1119 - Business 1120 - Ringout to Meatwitch VMB (CNAM: WINDSTREAM) 1121 - Loud, 20 hertz ringing x1 + hang up 1122 - Mitel PBX ringout to Express Messenger VMB, answers with **93604 1123 - Ringout 1124 - Ringout 1125 - Ringout 1126 - Ringout 1127 - Ringout 1128 - Ringout 1129 - Ringout 1130 - Modem 1131 - Ringout 1133 - Ringout 1134 - Ringout 1135 - Ringout 1136 - Ringout 1137 - Ringout to Meatwitch VMS 1138 - Ringout to Meatwitch VMS 1139 - Ringout 1140 - Ringout 1141 - Rings x1, hangs up quickly 1142 - Ringout 1143 - Ringout 1144 - Ringout 1145 - Ringout 1146 - Ringout 1147 - Modem 1148 - Modem 1149 - Ringout 1150 - Ringout 1151 - Ringout 1152 - Ringout 1153 - Ringout 1154 - Ringout 1155 - Ringout 1156 - Modem 1157 - Ringout 1158 - Ringout 1159 - Ringout 1160 - Ringout 1161 - Modem 1162 - Ringout 1163 - Ringout 1164 - Ringout to Meatwitch VMB 1166 - Ringout to Meatwitch VMB 1170 - Ringout 1171 - Ringout to Meatwitch VMB 1180 - Meatwitch VMB 1183 - Meatwitch VMB 1184 - Meatwitch VMB 1186 - Meatwitch VMB 1187 - Ringout 1190 - Really old AIS. Cognitronics? NIS report. 1191 - Same as 1190 1192 - Same as 1190 1193 - Same as 1190 1194 - Same as 1190 1195 - Same as 1190 1196 - Ringout 1197 - Ringout 1198 - Same as 1190
  6. 1 point
    I remember turning in my final 286 assembly program to my high school programming teacher on a single 360KB 5 1/4" floppy, with a tag containing my name and a description of the program stapled (gasp!) to the upper-left corner (arrrrgh!) of the disk jacket (A BIG FUCKING NO-NO ANYPLACE ELSE!!!!!!). That was around 1993 or 1994 (it was when Workgroups 3.11 and MessyDOS 6.22 were considered current) and the last time I ever touched any form of assembly language. I might actually still have it somewhere but Allah only knows if it's still readable (probably not). I remember they had an XT in the corner of th lab with external 8" drive that nobody ever used. You could tell the computer hadn't been switched on in at least a decade from the layer of dust. I wonder what ever happened to that machine.
  7. 1 point
    Good thing I'm a girl.
  8. 1 point
    @ThoughtPhreaker Thanks a billion!!! I'm in with the password you supplied!
  9. 1 point
    So I have been on the hunt for a community of people who find the postal system not only interesting, but hackable. So far I have reached into the realms of postal machinery like Multi Line Optical Character Readers (MLOCR) or Facer Cancellers(FC), 4 state and 2D barcodes, Return To Senders (RTS), Facing Identifying Marks (FIM), Phosphor in postage, etc I have spent a long time systematically testing the machinery and even the staff of the postal company, and have executed many successfully experiments. including international phacs. so I guess I just wanted to know if there is any other OCD mail hackers out there? Phack Yeah! sT4mP5
  10. 1 point
    I'll update this post with some more info when I'm not getting ready for work, but for now, the password for your release 6 card is '0nvacat10n'. Nothing like a cute little Definity word scramble to start your day. I guess you just had a different build than the other release 6 I unlocked.
  11. 1 point
    617-534-0000 - Voicemail unavailable recording. 15A announcement machine (the kind the 5ESS uses) on a DMS-100? 617-248-9901 - Permanent signal announcement 617-248-9902 - Dial 1+NPA for toll calls rec 617-248-9970 - rec, "We're sorry, your call cannot be completed as dialed. You need additional digits to complete your call. This is a recording." 617-638-9905 - "This is an emergency telephone. Press 1 to talk..." 252-441-4392 - Norstar key system at Carolina Telephone Kill Devil Hills CO. Press * for options 207-442-9923 - Modem 207-442-9932 - 480 hertz tone!? Times out to ACB cause code 207-442-9936 - 620+480 hertz tone, times out to ACB cause code Those last two I'm really scratching my head on.
  12. 1 point
    Anybody caught spamming for "dumps", "fullz", credit card lists, phone number lists, pay proxies, password lists or anything of that sort, for free or for profit, will meet their creator in /dev/null if they are found anywhere on this site! Such sercvices are not only 100% illegal but they have absolutely nothing to do with hacking. This site is not the place to be advertising for-profit illicit services. If you post these you can expect to have your ass permabanned. I really hope we're clear on this. Note that this warning does NOT extend to the legitimate research exchange scans/"jans" posted in Old Skool Phreaking. Here is an example of the type of material that will get you in deep shit if you post it here (typos left unedited, for perspective): And if one does get through and they have provided contact information, and I haven't removed the post yet, I encourage everybody able to do so to mailbomb them in the mean time with "hi, hello, how r u, dude, man etc etc etc". Why not, they're wasting our time and disk space, it's your duty to waste theirs. Turnabout is fair play.
  13. 1 point
    Ahh AOHell Those were the good old days. Not hacking but just stupid harmless phun. (misty-eyed with nostalgia)
  14. 1 point
    I was a TSPS (dial 0 or 0+) operator in the late 1970s and it was very possible. If I remember correctly we key pulsed 700 + the subject phone number and it would cut right in on the line. We could hear the conversation of both parties. The purpose was for emergency interrupts. This would be limited to phones that we served as local operators. (Charlotte & most of Western NC) I could not be used for anything outside the area. Of course this was done on official telco equipment. Whether it could be accessed by the phreakers with a blue box is beyond me.
  15. 1 point
    Hey guys I'm pretty new to phones and scanning and found this weird thing and was wondering if any of you guys happen to know what this thing is: 601-748-4225 enter 5555# - it seems to be some kind of monitor with weird conversations.   Any idea?   --heartbreakr
  16. 0 points
    From what I heard several years ago, the later 4ESS switches that were installed in the mid to late 90s were of a newer generation than those from 1976 to the late 80s. And yes, some of these switches are 40 years old!! But as TP said, over time I bet most of the guts have been replaced (though I do wonder about the announcement machines - some of which are quite broken!). But I think to say relevant, AT&T like a lot of other telcos are going VoIP. I know Verizon basically runs it's old school POTS TDM network and a VoIP network in parallel with gateways to cross connect the two worlds as necessary. Yeah, AT&T has introduced DMS-250, 5ESS, etc. into the long distance network, but the venerable 4ESS is still the backbone. Just curious what their strategy is to play in a mixed TDM and IP environment moving forward.