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zal91

This could get funny.

31 posts in this topic

Try this under Windows:

Right-click on the Desktop

Create a new Shortcut

Point the location of the item to any executable... such as: c:\windows\system32\calc.exe

Name the shortcut, for example, www.microsoft.com

Start Internet Explorer

Type "www.microsoft.com" into the address bar

????????? :huh:

Profit.

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but you can still get to microsoft.com if you use http://

However this would be a pretty cool way to block sites.

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Yeah, but who types http://

LOL, I just thought of something make a batch file with,

del *.*

y

And have it launch when someoe goes to 'myspace.com'.

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I'd like to do that to my teacher for an end of the year prank... ^_^ ...hahahaha

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I found anotherone,

Make a new folder on the desktop named 'NotePad'

In IE try and view the source of a page.

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How did you figure these out? I would have never thought that explorer was looking at desktop shortcuts when typing in the address bar.

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Wow...I have to admit that I did not know this. This could be very, VERY dangerous!

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wow. that is pretty leet, and will very likely provide hours of workplace fun (let's just say, i've got a co-worker who checks hackaday every 5 minutes, and he'll get a great shock when it starts playing some hot farm loving video or something :))

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They didn't figure it out.

It was mentioned in a news article on infoworld recently discussing the dangers of hidden features. Zal's post is a copypaste rip of mikko hypponen's post on f-secure's blog.

Credit where credit is due people. comon now.

;)

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They didn't figure it out.

Let's see if we can figure somthing out. Here's what I've found so far:

For a more complex URL like binrev.com/faq.html you can simply put a shortcut to a program named faq.html into a binrev.com directory on the desktop. I'm working on getting to URL's that contain special characters.

Edit: Here's another good one.

You can hide the file on the desktop. So, for example create a shortcut to the calc program, name it binrev.com, then open explorer and open the desktop folder. In properties, hide calc, and under Tools, go to folder options and choose "Do not show hidden files and folders." Now the user can't see any obvious reason why typing binrev.com opens up calc.

Edited by Alkali Jack
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I tried to do the microsoft.com shortcut and what happens is a pop-up says:

"Access to this resource has been disallowed."

But the Notepad trick is hilarious...

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I tried to do the microsoft.com shortcut and what happens is a pop-up says:

"Access to this resource has been disallowed."

But the Notepad trick is hilarious...

I can sort of understand why they would make it so that entering a program name at the address bar would open it up from the Desktop, buy why does View Source open up a foler named NotePad? That just doesn't make sense.

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I swear I heard somewhere that when you ask to open up a file, Windows doesn't go directly to it.

Feel free to correct me, but I think this is what happens:

You click for notepad:

Looks for notepad on desktop

Looks for notepad in C

Looks for notepad in WINDOWS

Looks for notepad in system 32

Opens notepad

So...I think it just sees notepad right there and opens it....I think... :unsure: ....

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Its windows does anyone really expect it to make sense?....though again the same thing could be said about *nix at some times. :D

Edited by Valex
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Yeah, haha, I wonder how Vista will look it up...Hmm, they're having a beta of vista downtown at the Microsoft campus...Maybe I'll check it out... ^_^ ....

And quick question, wtf is the rating thing under my member number....

Edited by Mr Dink
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its how many times you have been warned. 3 strikes and your out :devil:

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Have I been warned? Um, how...Argh!

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just FYI, i tried it at work and i don't think IE7 allows you to do this trick directly. it opens up some window asking me if i am sure i want to open (i used google.com as an example) "www.google.com.lnk". kind of puts the damper on the fun :(

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Ah,IE7 is a cheap rip-off of Firefox,Screw you Micro$hat

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Hmm, I must see IE7 sometime soon....

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I swear I heard somewhere that when you ask to open up a file, Windows doesn't go directly to it.

Feel free to correct me, but I think this is what happens:

You click for notepad:

Looks for notepad on desktop

Looks for notepad in C

Looks for notepad in WINDOWS

Looks for notepad in system 32

Opens notepad

So...I think it just sees notepad right there and opens it....I think... :unsure: ....

the easiest way to test whether this is true is put different links to different programs called notepad.exe into these various folders and see which one gets opened up first. If this is true and you want to find out what the second directory is, just remove "notepad.exe" from the first directory.

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Now that you mention it (Mr. Dink) it seems that what is happening is the PATH environment variable is being used. I can't believe I didn't think of it at first but the way it works, or worked in DOS, was that any command you typed would search the path but before it did that it would always search your current directory first. Since you are 'in' your desktop that's the directory that gets searched first for the names of any programs that you want to run. Unless of course you spell out the whole path to the program. The other thing was, and don't quote me on the order, is that .bat files would run before .com files which would run before .exe files. So if you had notepad.bat, notepad.com and notepad.exe then notepad.bat would take precedence.

You can check your PATH variable by right clicking on 'my computer', go to properties->advanced and then click on 'environment variables' at the bottom. If you can't see the whole thing just go to the command line and type "path".

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ooo danke, my school uses an older version of IE maybe i can mess around with this there.

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Here is another one.

1. Open Notepad

2. Type the text "this app can break" (without quotes)

3. Save the file

4. Re-open the file in Notepad

It's not an easter egg.

(even though it seems like a funny one), and as it turns out, Notepad writes the file correctly. It's only when Notepad reads the file back in that it seems to lose its mind.

But we can't even blame Notepad: it's a limitation of Windows itself, specifically the Windows function that Notepad uses to figure out if a text file is Unicode or not.

You see, text files containing Unicode (more correctly, UTF-16-encoded Unicode) are supposed to start with a "Byte-Order Mark" (BOM), which is a two-byte flag that tells a reader how the following UTF-16 data is encoded. Given that these two bytes are exceedingly unlikely to occur at the beginning of an ASCII text file, it's commonly used to tell whether a text file is encoded in UTF-16.

But plenty of applications don't bother writing this marker at the beginning of a UTF-16-encoded file. So what's an app like Notepad to do?

Windows helpfully provides a function called IsTextUnicode()--you pass it some data, and it tells you whether it's UTF-16-encoded or not.

Sorta.

It actually runs a couple of heuristics over the first 256 bytes of the data and provides its best guess. As it turns out, these tests aren't terribly reliable for very short ASCII strings that contain an even number of lower-case letters, like "this app can break", or more appropriately, "this api can break".

The documentation for IsTextUnicode says:

These tests are not foolproof. The statistical tests assume certain amounts of variation between low and high bytes in a string, and some ASCII strings can slip through. For example, if lpBuffer points to the ASCII string 0x41, 0x0A, 0x0D, 0x1D (A\n\r^Z), the string passes the IS_TEXT_UNICODE_STATISTICS test, though failure would be preferable.

From http://apipes.blogspot.com/

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