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Making your ext2fs partition journaled


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#1 JHVH-1

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Posted 12 February 2003 - 09:14 AM

Hey guys, I am new to the forums and thought I would post this handy info that even a lot of hardcore linux guys might not have known!

To add a journal to your ext2fs and thus practically make it an ext3fs just use the following command:

tune2fs -j /dev/[INSERT PARTITION HERE]

In my case its /dev/hde1

All this does is set up a journal for your filesystem. So, all you need is ext3fs support in your kernel. BUT, here is the beautiful thing: this will still boot as ext2fs! So if you run into a bind and all you have is some floppy or CD to boot off of and it happens to not have ext3fs support, you can still mount the partition as ext2fs. If linux has the support, it picks up on the fact that there is a journal and uses it.

So this simple little command may save you all that time of fscking and you don't have to go and repartition or back up and reformat.

#2 dual

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Posted 12 February 2003 - 09:27 AM

That's cool. If I have an ext2 box (I think they're all ext3 and reiser), it's gettin' a journal. I've been toying with the idea of converting to IBM's JFS - Journaled Filesystem - but...laziness...setting...in..

#3 nick84

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Posted 12 February 2003 - 09:28 AM

Im sorry but could someone translate that into English for all the hardcore Wndows guys :)

Ow and welcome to the forums :)

#4 dual

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Posted 12 February 2003 - 09:57 AM

Check this nick -

definition of a journaling file system

#5 nick84

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Posted 12 February 2003 - 10:16 AM

Check this nick -
definition of a journaling file system

Thanks dual
This slightly surprised me though:

By the same token, the default Linux system, ext2fs, does not journal at all. That means, a system crash--although infrequent in a Linux environment--can corrupt an entire disk volume.



#6 BoBB

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Posted 12 February 2003 - 12:09 PM

Well, as with any non-journaling file system shutting it down improperly can cause problems, sometimes HUGE problems, its almost allways fixable though. Under *nix there is a utility called fsck, it stands for file system check and is often played off as the word f*ck because if you have to fsck you are f*cked :) I try to use fsck instead of f*ck as much as possible because im trying to get off the whole 12 year-old attitude of cussing in every sentence. Wow talk about completely off topic. Anyways, for windows there is the big blue disk check of death we love to hate. What allways got be was it told you to turn off your computer via the shutdown menu yet if you were seeing the screen it was because windows shut its own crappy self down improperly. Anyways my point is that the corruption is not as serious as it sounds, but journaling does help and its super easy to get on a *nix box with ext2 and about 80 bucks for partition magic if you run windows, it can convert from fat32 to ntfs(a jounraling file system)




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