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Wiring an iPod to a Payphone


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#1 DrGonzo23

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 12:29 PM

Hi all. I'm new to this board and am very glad I found it. I was hoping some pros out there could help with a project I'm trying to accomplish.

I'm trying to connect an old payphone, (in my house), to an ipod so it will play music/audio books through the telephone receiver. Can anyone offer any insight as to how this will work? Ideally I'd like to rewire or pair the wiring so I can use the ipods mini mic jack to go right into the payphone. I'd also like to do this with a classic princess home phone, however the payphone is more pressing. Thanks for your help in advance.
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#2 ThoughtPhreaker

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 11:32 AM

Someone might be able to answer this a little better then I can, but the networks in Western Electric phones (assuming your payphone is Western Electric too) are pretty much the same. Impedence might be an issue, but you should be able to send line level audio directly into the mic input. The easiest way to do this on a Princess phone is to unscrew the mouthpiece cap, take the mic capsule out, and stick alligator clips onto the terminals. I learned the hard way that doing this a lot will eventually break your terminals, though.

 

Unscrew the cover from your phone and find the red, black, green and white wires going to your receiver - or the receiver's connector if the phone doesn't have a dedicated handset. The red and black wires go to the mic. Unscrew them and connect the ground and positive wire for one channel of a 1/8" jack onto it and plug it into your iPod. Few voicemail systems have automatic gain control anymore, so if you're looking to avoid cellular codecs, that should work for testing levels as well. The process is more or less the same for anything using AC power, but you might have to put a 600:1 isolation transformer in between the phone's network and the audio source to avoid getting a loud 60 hertz buzz. If you don't want to buy one new, most modems have one.

 

Assuming your payphone has spade connectors to the handset, the process should be more or less the same for it. Have fun!


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#3 DrGonzo23

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 01:25 PM

Thanks so much for your response. Do you think it's possible to do this so that the alligator clips or wire pairing are invisible? Ideally, I'd like to do this so you can pick up the phone as someone normally would, and then you'd hear music being played on the receiver without knowing there is an ipod attached. So what I'm asking is, if I'm utilizing the red and black wires, could I plug a phone cable in to the phone's jack and then cut the wire to splice on to the 1/8" jack? Sort of reminds me of a beige box, instead of clipping red/green on to a NID, I'm essentially clipping on to an ipod. Again, thanks for your help!



#4 systems_glitch

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 01:53 PM

You should be able to hide it somewhere in the body of the payphone, there's lots of room in there, especially if you don't want to keep any of the coin processing hardware.



#5 DrGonzo23

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 04:56 PM

Yep, I'll definitely remove the coin hardware. Don't need it. My other questions is power. Would I use a 24v AC transformer to power the payphone? Would I use the same for a landline phone? 



#6 systems_glitch

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 04:57 PM

What  needs powered? You should be able to run audio directly into the earpiece.



#7 DrGonzo23

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 05:02 PM

I thought that I would need to power the payphone since it's not connected to a wall jack. Just to be clear, these phones will be stand alone devices. There won't be any way to dial in/out. They simply will feed the music from the ipod to the phone's receiver. 


Edited by DrGonzo23, 11 March 2013 - 05:02 PM.


#8 systems_glitch

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 05:48 PM

Yup, in that case you should be able to wire the audio out from the iPod right into the receiver. It's high enough resistance that it shouldn't harm the iPod.



#9 LATexan

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 04:57 PM

Dr. Gonzo, did you ever figure this out? I'm trying to accomplish the exact same thing for an art installation. Please let me know if you have answers! Thank you!



#10 JmanA9

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 06:05 PM

First off, do you have the two keys (one regular looking key that fits in the top lock and the T-type key) for the phone?  What kind of wiring is coming out the back of the phone?  If you don't have keys and don't have wiring coming out, I think you're SOL unless you can break into the phone.

 

There's two ways you could do this, I think:

 

1) Do what Dr. Gonzo proposed.  I'm not sure how you would make the recording start when someone picks up the phone and stop when someone hangs up the phone.  I'm not sure what happens if you connect an iPod to a telephone receiver and I don't know enough about electronics to guess what modifications/adaptations might be necessary.  But essentially, that's what you would be doing.  I'm sure someone here could figure out the electrical end.

 

2) Hook the phone up to a VOIP adapter as a "warm line" so as soon as you pick up the phone, the VOIP adapter dials an extension on an Asterisk PBX that plays back the recording.

 

Method 1 should work no matter what type of phone you have (COCOT or a CO-controlled phone) because you would be plugging directly into the receiver.  Method 2 won't work if you have a COCOT.  I think Method 1 might be best unless VOIP is your thing.



#11 scratchytcarrier

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 09:43 PM

(music)
These recordings are a tribute to the boys who sell maps to stars' homes.

This recording is for Tuesday evening and Wednesday evening, zero-five and zero-six, January, two-zero one-six.

Today's tape: comments.

Oh, guess it must be comment time again. Okay Scratchy, I'm trying to connect an old payphone, (in my house), to an Ipod so it will play music/audio books through the telephone receiver. On your next bulletin, could you please offer any insight as to how this will work? Ideally I'd like to rewire or pair the wiring so I can use the ipods mini mic jack to go right into the payphone. I'd also like to do this with a classic princess home phone, however the payphone is more pressing. Thanks for your help in advance. G'bald.

I'm trying to accomplish the exact same thing for an art installation. Please let me know if you have answers! Thank you!


What you're wanting to do is not very complicated at all. At the very least you need a loop emulator and an inter box, both of which can be found from places like Amazon. A loop emulator, basically, is like a small one-line PBX. A simple loop emulator has two RJ11 ports, one is your "low" line and the other is your "high" line, and as such these ports may be labeled "1" and "2", or "A" and "B" or any variations there of. Essentially then, what you would do is configure the emulator to operate in ringdown mode, stick the COCOT on the low end and the inter box, with the MP3 player connected to it, on the high end.

http://www.amazon.co...r/dp/B004PXK314
http://www.amazon.co...1/dp/B007Z85WTO (<-- "inter box")

Now, a point of clarification. If you don't get a usable signal level on the COCOT with an inter box then you may need to put an amplifier between the player's headphone out and the loop emulator as the player by itself may not have enough power to drive it directly, even when set at a high volume. This can be done similar to how Thoughtphreaker suggested earlier. Take the carbon transmitter out of a WE 2500 or a Princess (or a clone of one) then connect the output of a cassette recorder, with alligator clips, to the terminals in the handset. ((***faint talking in background***)) Then connect the player to the microphone input of the recorder and connect the fone to the loop emulator leaving it off-hook. SHUT UP. Umm, anyhow, you would then put the recorder into RECORD, with the player feeding, and turn the recorder's volume up until you get a decent audio level in the COCOT's receiver. This is your amplifier. Alternatively you could take the 2500/Princess/clone apart and hook the recorder straight into the transmitter's screw terminals on the network, which might actually work better than messing with alligator clips in the handset. This is basically like how phreaks used to do it with conf lines years ago to overcome lossy or noisy analogue trunks (or to be obnoxious). Depending how the emulator is configured, since the high-end phone is off-hook all the time, you need to put some sort of an answering device between the it and the emulator unit. Otherwise you might get a busy signal every time you take the COCOT off-hook because that's how the high end already is.

Now, the way Al Bernay described an answering device is as follows. An answering device works by the ringing of the phone, pulling a relay in, and the relay connecting its points together in such a way as to connect the phone across the relay coil itself; causing the DC in the phone like to keep the relay activated that is down, which of course maintains the points that short across, and keep the coil on the line. In more detail, your phone line is two wires, a plus and a minus. From the plus you go through a capacitor ranging from 5 to 20 MFD (milifarad?), that capacitor goes to the one side of the input of a bridge rectifier. The minus side of the phone line goes directly to the other input of the bridge rectifier. The plus side of the bridge rectifier goes to one side of the relay coil, the minus side of the rectifier goes to the other side of the relay coil. Now, the relay has two points that are normally open, but close when the relay does. On one of those points you would connect it directly to the plus side of the phone line. The other point on the relay is connected to the plus side of the bridge rectifier. This is your answering device: somebody rings, it'll answer the phone, when somebody hangs up it releases. The circuit that Al described, that I just gave you, is quite old. It's from the mid 70s. If you try and use it on the PSTN, as far as I know it CAN NOT be used on ESS, including possibly DMS, EAX, a Redcom or any other common-controlled or digital switching equipment. It reportedly can only be used on step and #5 crossbar. It is possible that this circuit might be usable with an emulator or other types of PBXes.

And look, assbreath. Speaking of obnoxious, I don't know what you meant by "g'bald". But anyway, I will now use the bully machine with an amplifier in the way I just described, to blast your ears out with your stupid "g'bald", so here goes:

G'BA-G'BA-G'BA-G'BA-G'BA-G'BA-G'BA-G'BA-G'BA-G'BA-G'BA-G'BA-G'BA-

Take that, assbreath.




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