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Odd Loop Numbers, expanded announcement system, and other stuff


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#1 N01zii

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Posted 28 December 2012 - 04:26 PM

So, I've found a lot of loop numbers in my area code, at least one to three hundred. The only problem is, none of them appear to have another side. They're all xxx-xxx-9996 so far. 9995 is either not in service, or a normal person. Same with 9997. Calling the same number from both phones just gave me the same screeching tone on both phones, not the other side of the loop. Anyone know of a way I can find the other side? It would be much appreciated.

Also, I've found what I dubbed "Tone Test Lines", because they don't sound like fax machines, they all play the same tones, and they hang up after playing them. I'm not sure what else they could be. If anyone else knows, feel free to post.

The "Tone Test Line" numbers:

248-286-9996

I've also found an Expanded Announcement System in my area code. I got in with 1234#, but haven't really explored this yet. I've read the document outlining them on thisisarecording.com, but the YouTube videos have been taken down and I'm nowhere closer to finding out what I can do with it. If anyone can help, it would be appreciated!

Random interesting numbers for your troubles:

Not Accepting Calls - 248-228-9996
Oddly slow recording - 248-232-9996
Completely silent - 248-253-9996
Unassigned Number - 248-266-9996

And about 1/4th of my loops: (Didn't want to type out the other one or two hundred)

248-204-9996
248-205-9996
248-208-9996
248-244-9996
248-258-9996
248-263-9996
248-264-9996
248-267-9996
248-269-9996
248-270-9996
248-280-9996
248-283-9996
248-287-9996
248-288-9996
248-291-9996
248-292-9996
248-295-9996
248-299-9996
248-307-9996

Also, note that every number that I've discovered or called has been hand-scanned. I've never wardialed before, never had the chance because of my super strict parents and their nazi-like control over our phone systems. These were all hand-dialed from my cell phone.

Anyway, enjoy!

-N01zii (Noisy)

P.S. If anyone has any tips for a fairly new phreak, they would be appreciated. I'm still in the process of learning about switches and COs and all of that stuff. Is dumpster diving still worth it? How can I find a telco/CO in my local area? How do you find phone numbers belonging to the CO that aren't loops? (I've been dialing 248-xxx-9996 to find all of my numbers so far) How do you call into a switch? What can you do with one? What do they do? Etc etc etc. Sorry for so many questions, I'm just so curious! I've already mastered the art of computer hacking and computer security, so next comes phones haha.

#2 nyphonejacks

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 08:19 PM

dumpster diving could still be worth it... many people do not pay attention to what they throw away, and i am sure that there is plenty of information or cool stuff to be found in the trash.. but be careful it could technically be illegal..

try looking at telcodata for CO locations... http://www.telcodata...s-by-city-state would be a good place to start..

#3 ThoughtPhreaker

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Posted 31 December 2012 - 01:52 AM

So, I've found a lot of loop numbers in my area code, at least one to three hundred. The only problem is, none of them appear to have another side. They're all xxx-xxx-9996 so far. 9995 is either not in service, or a normal person. Same with 9997. Calling the same number from both phones just gave me the same screeching tone on both phones, not the other side of the loop. Anyone know of a way I can find the other side? It would be much appreciated.

Also, I've found what I dubbed "Tone Test Lines", because they don't sound like fax machines, they all play the same tones, and they hang up after playing them. I'm not sure what else they could be. If anyone else knows, feel free to post.


Those're modems. V.90 or something similar from the sound of it. You'll find plenty of them lying around, and very few are for internet access. If you're looking for a good place to scan, 99xx is a good place to check in former Bell-owned exchanges. Anything owned by Teleport Communications Group usually has stuff in 98xx.

Scanning, which you're probably aware of, is basically just manual wardialing. Despite being manual, though, you'll find a lot more interesting stuff and you'll find it faster. This is also the defacto way of finding test numbers of any sort the telco might have. Here's a couple of good articles on the subject;
http://oldskoolphrea...eak/ex_scan.txt
http://oldskoolphrea...hreak/espt2.txt

Also, this is by no means an absolute determiner for finding stuff, but you might find this interesting;
https://ebiznet.att.com/testline/

You seem passionate, and that's definitely a good start, but the one thing I'd suggest is that you use a landline or the closest thing you can get to it. The golden rule of phreaking is that there's always some small detail or another that's either interesting, or can help you out a lot. The difference between that and a cell phone is pretty staggering; it's like having someone well into their nineties narrate a song from your favorite band to you, or hearing it at a concert.

Oddly slow recording - 248-232-9996


That's a stock announcement on a DMS-100. Expect to hear a lot of those when you're calling CLECs; they usually don't bother changing their announcements. Some custom calling feature and error recordings aren't always included, so every so often you'll find switchmen doing a hilariously bad job reading announcements.

How do you call into a switch? What can you do with one? What do they do?


In a nutshell, they're like routers, but with a much larger degree of interaction with people. They're responsible for making and breaking any connection you hear, giving you dialtone, generating ringing, and in some cases, announcements.

As for calling into them, there's no manufacturer provided form of voice administration like with an EAS, but there's always the possibility that larger telcos have custom designed IVRs to do something like it. The typical way a switch's hardware architecture is setup is to have a dedicated processor for maintenance or administration tasks; this probably has little direct interaction with a linecard or anything else that handles subscriber input. The manufacturer provided ways of administration are ethernet (via telnet; this is probably connected to a VPN or isolated network), or serial ports which may be connected to modems.

A switch, however, is going to be monitored by real humans in a network operations center around the clock; they aren't machines you toss in the corner and forget about. Logging into one probably isn't a good idea.




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