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#1 Gregimbal

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Posted 13 February 2012 - 09:13 PM

I am looking into learning how to program and I am trying to pick a language that is pretty simple less than 6 months to get the fundamentals and I want to do some scripting/automating simple stuff and also be able to talk with com ports.I am pretty good with HTML and CSS should I look into a object oriented web language first or what.Looked a Python and Ruby because they both have web frameworks should I stick with those or try something else thanks.

#2 Powermaniac7

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 04:59 AM

I might as well point out I've recently gone and bought Java A Beginner's Guide Fifth Edition. Which is incredibly detailed and looks like a nice place to start.

Also a lot of things are now written in Java and it is similar to C and C++. So if you want to learn them afterwards it will be rather easy.

So shouldn't have any problems finding whatever you want to do specifically in Java on the internet.

#3 ArekXV

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 12:45 PM

I am looking into learning how to program and I am trying to pick a language that is pretty simple less than 6 months to get the fundamentals and I want to do some scripting/automating simple stuff and also be able to talk with com ports.I am pretty good with HTML and CSS should I look into a object oriented web language first or what.Looked a Python and Ruby because they both have web frameworks should I stick with those or try something else thanks.


If you want to learn scripting language then IMHO stick to Ruby, Python is sometimes easier to write stuff with but since you're learning how to program learning correct syntax and how variable scopes work is important, of course Python has that but the way you write a class or a function in Python can be a bit confusing so stick to Ruby to learn to ropes of scripting languages, also scripting languages go in the class of Very High Level Programming (High Level doesn't mean complicated but in fact the opposite - simplified). If you want to make real executables then try a High Level Programming Languages like C#, Delphi, etc...

When you get comfy with high level you can go and try medium Level Programming Languages like C/C++.

If you're looking for a total beginner language then try Small Basic, it's best for learning the way the programming language works (but actuall programming is not recommended in it).

If you're looking for a simple language which makes self contained executables (no dependencies, great for quite a lot of stuff you know), then try PureBasic. It's Basic Language with some advanced features.

Once you get really comfortable with all that you can go to mother of all programming (no not the binary one XD), but Assembly language. :)

It all depends on what you want to use programming for.

Well hope I've helped you. :)

#4 5imp7y

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 07:57 AM

Good god assembly language....

I have to say i find java to be much harder and long winded than c++ but my knowledge of it is limited. I would start with c++ then you have a base to work up on to java, and i am dead honest when i say c++ for dummies is the best book i bought on c++. No hello world bs or anything, just the good stuff. I dont think c++ is classifyed under scripting but still i feel it should be the center of the jorney where you branch off.


I am looking into learning how to program and I am trying to pick a language that is pretty simple less than 6 months to get the fundamentals and I want to do some scripting/automating simple stuff and also be able to talk with com ports.I am pretty good with HTML and CSS should I look into a object oriented web language first or what.Looked a Python and Ruby because they both have web frameworks should I stick with those or try something else thanks.


If you want to learn scripting language then IMHO stick to Ruby, Python is sometimes easier to write stuff with but since you're learning how to program learning correct syntax and how variable scopes work is important, of course Python has that but the way you write a class or a function in Python can be a bit confusing so stick to Ruby to learn to ropes of scripting languages, also scripting languages go in the class of Very High Level Programming (High Level doesn't mean complicated but in fact the opposite - simplified). If you want to make real executables then try a High Level Programming Languages like C#, Delphi, etc...

When you get comfy with high level you can go and try medium Level Programming Languages like C/C++.

If you're looking for a total beginner language then try Small Basic, it's best for learning the way the programming language works (but actuall programming is not recommended in it).

If you're looking for a simple language which makes self contained executables (no dependencies, great for quite a lot of stuff you know), then try PureBasic. It's Basic Language with some advanced features.

Once you get really comfortable with all that you can go to mother of all programming (no not the binary one XD), but Assembly language. :)

It all depends on what you want to use programming for.

Well hope I've helped you. :)



#5 billy545455

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 06:48 PM

I guess it all depends on what you want to use it for. If your into programming micro controllers or anything that involves programming chips or programs without a GUI ( like terminal applications) i recommend learning C. For games java is the way to go. If your into making a program that interacts with linux that is easy to learn and useful i say stick with python.

#6 Seal

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 01:54 PM

This is one of those questions where if you ask ten people, you'll get ten answers. None of them are wrong; there are benefits to each of these languages from the perspective of a newbie. It becomes a question of what you prioritize.

Personally, I lean towards recommending Python. It's reliance on whitespace to identify blocks of code makes for clean looking source code, which is often an issue with newcomers to whitespace-blind languages like C/C++/JavaScript/etc. It has a gazillion libraries, which makes doing such tasks as a simple HTTP GET request far simpler than with sockets and C/C++. It supports a number of programming paradigms (object oriented, functional) which really facilitates the ability to write simple code.

#7 seabass

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 01:21 AM

I vote for python. It's a simple language to learn, but can be very powerful later on in your programming journey. That being said, it really doesn't matter what language you learn, as long as you really learn the concepts. The difference between languages basicly comes down to syntax.

#8 Powermaniac7

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 04:49 AM

This is one of those questions where if you ask ten people, you'll get ten answers. None of them are wrong; there are benefits to each of these languages from the perspective of a newbie. It becomes a question of what you prioritize.

Personally, I lean towards recommending Python. It's reliance on whitespace to identify blocks of code makes for clean looking source code, which is often an issue with newcomers to whitespace-blind languages like C/C++/JavaScript/etc. It has a gazillion libraries, which makes doing such tasks as a simple HTTP GET request far simpler than with sockets and C/C++. It supports a number of programming paradigms (object oriented, functional) which really facilitates the ability to write simple code.


Hmm, well I'm starting/started in Java only just picked up Java, A Beginner's Guide, Fifth Edition, which is rather detailed. But I either misunderstood, skipped, or it wasn't there but I'm sure it was the part where it mentions you need to use command prompt as the javac and java compilers...It mentioned something about setting the PATH but not how...And also you would need to use Command Prompt seeing as it isn't recommended to use an IDE...Which left me stumped when I left it for a couple days after reading the introduction to come back to do the actual coding...

I had to look it up on the internet, because there was a large amount of confusion. I can link you guys to a forum if you want to see what happened...?

Anyway, just make sure it is really, really detailed on how to set it up and actually considers the fact you may be completely computer illiterate and or doesn't assume you have done things it hasn't mentioned to do -.-

Only thing that has kind of put me off now, same thing happened when I was younger, a guide didn't mention I needed a compiler to code into, so I had no idea what to do with the code...

Anyway from what I understand any language is good except people advise not starting with C/C++ because of bad habits that form.

And Seal haven't seen your display picture around for a while, good to see your visiting/posting again.

#9 Seal

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 11:53 AM

As to how to add a path to the PATH variable, I'm assuming you run Windows. If so, look here for how to do it:
http://www.computerh...es/ch000549.htm

That said, if you're having trouble setting things up, you could try toying with this website:
http://ideone.com/

It lets you write and run Java code right there. Good for toying with the language for the first time.

Thanks for the welcome. :)

#10 Powermaniac7

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 01:18 AM

As to how to add a path to the PATH variable, I'm assuming you run Windows. If so, look here for how to do it:
http://www.computerh...es/ch000549.htm

That said, if you're having trouble setting things up, you could try toying with this website:
http://ideone.com/

It lets you write and run Java code right there. Good for toying with the language for the first time.

Thanks for the welcome. :)


Thanks for those links, I looked around on the net to do with the PATH and found an answer myself, just can't believe they didn't mention that before hand or the fact you have to open command prompt to basically do anything in the first place -.-...

Oh the thing you might be able to answer though is: Do I have to place the files I want to compile in say the default directory because otherwise I have to set it to the directory of where I have the files anyway and which I've now moved them to where javac and java are because I thought I had to. Thus rendering the setting up of the PATH pointless...So my default directory is C:\Users\Powermaniac so I would then need to place all my coded and compiled files in the folder Powermaniac, right?

Might as well link you to then forum containing my thoughts on the fact it didn't mention that and my confusion that was explained in more detail there:

http://forums.atomic...showtopic=48194

Sorry for partially derailing Gregimbal.

Edited by Powermaniac7, 08 March 2012 - 01:18 AM.


#11 Seal

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 10:09 AM

You can place your source code wherever you want. You don't need it to be in the same directory as your Java compiler. If you hadn't added the Java compiler directory to the PATH variable, you would have just needed to specify the absolute path of the compiler executable when calling it.

To be clear: you can put the source code wherever you want. I put mine for Windows 7 in:
C:\Users\<My Account Name>\Development\Name_of_my_project\

#12 Powermaniac7

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 12:23 AM

This is the problem if I don't direct Command Prompt to the directory containing my code:

javac: file not found: example.java
Usage: javac <options> <source files>
use -help for a list of possible options

After typing C:\Users\Powermaniac>"javac example.java" (the part in "" was what I typed but that is what it looked like in full.

So that is why I'm kind of confused...As to where I'm supposed to put the code, javac seems to work but I have to direct command propmt to the location of my coding I want it to convert to bytecode and then direct java to the bytecode that I want to be compiled/run (run? displays what I want it to say...so run or compiled?)...

Edited by Powermaniac7, 12 March 2012 - 12:26 AM.


#13 army_of_one

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 01:35 PM

This is one of those questions where if you ask ten people, you'll get ten answers. None of them are wrong; there are benefits to each of these languages from the perspective of a newbie. It becomes a question of what you prioritize.

Personally, I lean towards recommending Python. It's reliance on whitespace to identify blocks of code makes for clean looking source code, which is often an issue with newcomers to whitespace-blind languages like C/C++/JavaScript/etc. It has a gazillion libraries, which makes doing such tasks as a simple HTTP GET request far simpler than with sockets and C/C++. It supports a number of programming paradigms (object oriented, functional) which really facilitates the ability to write simple code.


I agree. If you want easy-to-learn & quickly build cool stuff, then Python is the way to go. It has less boilerplate than the heavyweight languages. This helps beginners focus on turning their ideas into software. However, I second another poster's claim that the first language should depend on what you're trying to get into. C is definitely better if you're aiming for embedded, Visual Basic if you're doing basic .NET apps (esp GUI), Perl for regex processing, Python/Java/Scala for cross-platform server-side app coding, SQL for databases, & HTML/JavaScript/AJAX for client-side. COBOL is also an option, being the backbone of transaction processing. (Note: see Just Friggin Kidding on COBOL).

#14 serrath

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 12:19 AM

Grab Eclipse for Java and just do everything in there. Save yourself this mucking around with the command prompt and trouble organizing your files. If you ever plan on doing any serious Java programming, you should know how to use Eclipse well. (It's got spot-on documentation, so give that a read if you have difficulty.)

#15 army_of_one

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 10:21 AM

Grab Eclipse for Java and just do everything in there. Save yourself this mucking around with the command prompt and trouble organizing your files. If you ever plan on doing any serious Java programming, you should know how to use Eclipse well. (It's got spot-on documentation, so give that a read if you have difficulty.)


Anyone looking into Java should also consider Scala and Netbeans. Scala is a superior language that's Java compatible. Netbeans is a very popular development tool and Eclipse's primary competitor. I know many Java developers that prefer Netbeans to Eclipse. Netbeans was also faster last time I tested it. (Note: This may have changed.) The one good thing about Eclipse is that many different languages and tools build their IDE on top of it. So, if you know it for one, it's easy to learn the next.




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