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Masking IP Address


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#1 variant3.cpp

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 08:16 AM

I am learning to use Linux and how to hack for the fun of learning how to. I am using BT5. I understand how to mask my IP address while I am using a web browser, via a proxy. My question is this: How would someone mask their IP address while using a program that runs via terminal? Also, what are some other good methods of masking one's IP address?
Almost every result I find using Google says "proxy". With all the hacking events in the news, I can't believe that a proxy or even a chain of proxies could prevent law enforcement from locating a hacker. What are they doing to keep from being caught?

#2 serrath

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 06:13 PM

I am learning to use Linux and how to hack for the fun of learning how to. I am using BT5. I understand how to mask my IP address while I am using a web browser, via a proxy. My question is this: How would someone mask their IP address while using a program that runs via terminal? Also, what are some other good methods of masking one's IP address?
Almost every result I find using Google says "proxy". With all the hacking events in the news, I can't believe that a proxy or even a chain of proxies could prevent law enforcement from locating a hacker. What are they doing to keep from being caught?


First: Don't do anything illegal, even for educational purposes.

That said, you can use a proxy (similar to the way you would with a web browser) to pass any traffic, not just browser traffic. When you're using a proxy to pass browser traffic, traffic on port 80 goes through your proxy and then to your source and vice versa. You can configure a proxy to pass just about any traffic to you (I'm not sure if proxies are meant to pass pings actually, now that I think of it) and back and forth.

Law enforcement units could get a warrant to search the proxy's records, but usually they don't need one because the proxy's owner will gladly give law enforcement any records they need to avoid implication in any illegal activity their hardware is being used for.

To avoid legal ramifications in cracking, most crackers use anonymity networks, a relatively new development in computing. The actual mechanic behind anonymity networks is slightly complicated, and they all work a little differently, so you'd do best to examine each one in depth before using it. Beware that many applications will leak hints (or more) about the true source of the data, and an anonymity network can't hide that. Understand the tools you're using before you use them or you're rolling the dice.

http://en.wikipedia...._proxy_software

#3 variant3.cpp

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 09:46 PM

Thanks for the info H4x0r! I am just curious. I got to thinking about that last night, I had to figure it out. The "Anonymous networks" sound interesting too! There is always something new to learn.

#4 serrath

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Posted 21 June 2011 - 10:13 PM

Thanks for the info H4x0r! I am just curious. I got to thinking about that last night, I had to figure it out. The "Anonymous networks" sound interesting too! There is always something new to learn.


Anytime. Feel free to post your learning materials here for future readers. The "tor" anonymity network protocol is probably your best shot at learning, but you might ultimately move elsewhere for actual usage.




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