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Help me decoding this number


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#1 jumpingjack

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 06:37 AM

Hey guys, can you help me guessing the telephone number in this file?
It's recorded from a payphone, so it has environmental noise and it's hard to decode. I tried processing it with Adobe Audition. No luck.

There is a high probability that this is a 9 digit number.

The first digit could be a 9, the second one might be 2 or 0.

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=Y24KNJZJ

Any ideas? Thanks in advance.

#2 ThoughtPhreaker

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 05:57 PM

The next time you record, please use something that doesn't record with AMR. Whenever codecs like this are actually used in voice telephony, an out of band touchtone standard is applied specifically because the codec isn't capable of reliably transmitting touchtones.

Anywho, the number is probably 900111027. There's a slight chance the first digit might be a six, but I'm positive about the rest.

#3 jumpingjack

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Posted 22 June 2011 - 06:43 AM

Sorry. I was outside and I only had my cell phone on hand.

But wow, nice guess! That looks like the correct number. It's a carrier, as expected.

This number behaves strangely. I get a busy tone when calling from a normal telephone line, and it connects when I dial it on payphone. I was thinking on spoofing the Caller ID, but the weird thing is that it can also connect from a cell phone line.

I'm gonna set up the bluetooth on my PC and try to connect. Let's see what happens.

#4 ThoughtPhreaker

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Posted 22 June 2011 - 05:57 PM

Sounds a bit like some of our payphones. They love communicating via modems, but some of the numbers they call will authenticate based on ANI fields. Do you have an ANAC you could try, though? It's possible that your cell phone is generating an ANI fail. If there's something indeed blocking calls from most phone lines, whatever doohickey that might be could be scratching it's head when it receives a fail.

I'm confused, though, what would using bluetooth accomplish? If you have a modem, you may want to consider forwarding your calls through your cell phone to the number the payphone dialed.

Also, woo, 1000th post!

#5 jumpingjack

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Posted 23 June 2011 - 05:15 AM

Allow me to explain a bit more. I live in Spain. This number is dialed by the payphone when you enter 3 times the wrong PIN code in the system menu, accessible by dialing *#23. I remember this code from an old doc I can't find now.

This is presumably the central number for all payphones, which are all the same.

I already know the number of this payphone and many others, so I guess that I don't need an ANAC. I don't even know if those things exist here.

I'm confused, though, what would using bluetooth accomplish? If you have a modem, you may want to consider forwarding your calls through your cell phone to the number the payphone dialed.

I'm just using the modem on my cell phone by connecting to a COM port thru Bluetooth, so I can use HyperTerminal. I suppose it's easier this way.

I tried both numbers, the central number connects at 9600 but doesn't show anything, then hangs. The payphones also connect at 9600 but they spit a string of 30 or 40 characters (garbage) to the terminal, and hangs.

I remember that the old doc I read said that those payphones might use a v.23 modem. Hmm... What do you think?

#6 ThoughtPhreaker

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Posted 30 June 2011 - 02:45 PM

Check to make sure you have the correct parity settings. If a modem is connecting properly, though, it's more than likely that it's using the correct modulation standard.

Most payphones use proprietary protocols to communicate, so at the least, you may want to consider doing a man in the middle attack against the payphone. Again, though, these are proprietary protocols, so whether or not it'll be easy to make sense without taking the time to reverse engineer it is debatable.




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