Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Out of area dial tone


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 doomer

doomer

    Will I break 10 posts?

  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 03 June 2011 - 12:18 PM

I'm in So Cal which is primarily AT&T and Verizon. I need a dialtone in Qwest residential where I can dial their Qwest managed 411. Its a work related task and to save time & before anyone offers up any e solutions such as free411.com, 800-GOOG-411 we've already been up that road.... the databases are merged and not in the exact order as what operators at the incumbent LEC see on their screens. Same goes for the XXX-555-1212 for National directory assistance.

If this is not possible or would cause problems (i.e. how would Qwest bill the $1.50 per call fee plus we dont want to get in trouble) then plan B question is:

Installing a line at a friends location in Colorado (Qwest), what is the simplist method/device combo so we can either dial into it and then it turns around using a 3 way calling flash so I can get a dialtone to dial 411?

On a side note we've already spoken to a few vendors such as Callfire and even tested Virtualpbx.com solution that was connected to Qwest via a DS3 but it only connected to their national DA not the residential operator group. Needs to be a residential POTS solution.

Trying to keep it low tech/low cost too.

Thanks in advance!

#2 nyphonejacks

nyphonejacks

    Dangerous free thinker

  • Members
  • 793 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:718

Posted 03 June 2011 - 04:45 PM

i just found this device "ULTIMATE CALL HANDLER" on sandman.com it is a little past the 1/2 way mark down the page here http://www.sandman.com/autodial.html (or you can just ctrl+f to enter the text that i put in quotes to find it easier)

other than that, i would recommend a linksys spa 3102 set up one SIP line, and connect it to a POTS line so that calls into the SIP line will connect to the POTS line dial tone and will be able to dial out..

#3 ThoughtPhreaker

ThoughtPhreaker

    BinRev veteran

  • Members
  • 1,225 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 03 June 2011 - 11:13 PM

Is there any reason in particular why it has to be Qwest 411? If it's just a few calls, I have a Qwest line, so I can call it for you.

Otherwise, the very simplest way would probably be to just use a modem. Even today, most laptops come with integrated softmodems on them. Ask your friend if he has one, or even just a modem in general. Particularly since we're not even using it as a modem, anything will work. The only requirement is that you can send it into command mode with Hyperterminal, minicom, or any other terminal emulator program.

Once you have a way to remotely access the computer on the other end - whether it be SSH, VNC, a person on the other end typing for you, or anything like that, call the line with the modem on it. As soon as the modem displays RING, type ATH1. The modem will respond OK, and answer the call.

After that, type ATDT !411!; . Don't forget the semicolon - this leaves the modem in command mode when it finishes three-waying the call, so it will neither hang up on you if it doesn't hear another modem or mistake something - or someone, for another modem.

If there's any kind of unusual code you need to use to three-way, such as *71, tell the modem to dial it as you would normally; telling it to dial something is quite simple. Following ATDT, the ! key will work the same as the flash button on the phone, a comma in the middle of a dialing sequence will tell it to wait a pre-determined length of time (usually two seconds), and the w key will tell the modem to wait for another dialtone before continuing to dial.

Other then that, just type ATH0 to hang up - you can get a complete list of commands from Wikipedia;

http://en.wikipedia..../AT_command_set

#4 doomer

doomer

    Will I break 10 posts?

  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 06 June 2011 - 11:32 AM

That Ultimate Call Handler is just the thing we need, great find, Thanks!!

i just found this device "ULTIMATE CALL HANDLER" on sandman.com it is a little past the 1/2 way mark down the page here http://www.sandman.com/autodial.html (or you can just ctrl+f to enter the text that i put in quotes to find it easier)

other than that, i would recommend a linksys spa 3102 set up one SIP line, and connect it to a POTS line so that calls into the SIP line will connect to the POTS line dial tone and will be able to dial out..



#5 doomer

doomer

    Will I break 10 posts?

  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 06 June 2011 - 11:36 AM

Thanks ThoughtPhreaker, really good detailed explanation for us noobs. Unfortunately it will be a few dozen calls into it ever couple weeks ongoing but thanks for the offer.

Is there any reason in particular why it has to be Qwest 411? If it's just a few calls, I have a Qwest line, so I can call it for you.

Otherwise, the very simplest way would probably be to just use a modem. Even today, most laptops come with integrated softmodems on them. Ask your friend if he has one, or even just a modem in general. Particularly since we're not even using it as a modem, anything will work. The only requirement is that you can send it into command mode with Hyperterminal, minicom, or any other terminal emulator program.

Once you have a way to remotely access the computer on the other end - whether it be SSH, VNC, a person on the other end typing for you, or anything like that, call the line with the modem on it. As soon as the modem displays RING, type ATH1. The modem will respond OK, and answer the call.

After that, type ATDT !411!; . Don't forget the semicolon - this leaves the modem in command mode when it finishes three-waying the call, so it will neither hang up on you if it doesn't hear another modem or mistake something - or someone, for another modem.

If there's any kind of unusual code you need to use to three-way, such as *71, tell the modem to dial it as you would normally; telling it to dial something is quite simple. Following ATDT, the ! key will work the same as the flash button on the phone, a comma in the middle of a dialing sequence will tell it to wait a pre-determined length of time (usually two seconds), and the w key will tell the modem to wait for another dialtone before continuing to dial.

Other then that, just type ATH0 to hang up - you can get a complete list of commands from Wikipedia;

http://en.wikipedia..../AT_command_set






BinRev is hosted by the great people at Lunarpages!