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Verizon calling cards


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#1 ThoughtPhreaker

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Posted 23 March 2011 - 07:29 PM

On the off chance that people might've bought one to call Japan this month, I thought I might ask about some really weird things the system does.

-The system blocks all area codes and exchanges that're unassigned, but for some reason, area code 600 is an exception. It'll accept area code 600 plus anything you feel like giving it. Any speculation on why this might be? I think it might be something like the AT&T 959 code.
- The code 212-811 goes to a Verizon 5ESS somewhere. Recently, the codes 212-711 and 212-311 started going to the Verizon local tandem (typically not accessible outside New York)132-A8. There used to be something like this on 718-811, but sometime within the past year, it's just gone to something that gives reorder.
- Everything else in the New York area acts like a legitimate local call from there. Even things like 914-394, which terminates to something with the recording ID 132-A11. I think this is the 5ESS tandem that handles inter-office calls within White Plains.

Try dialing random unassignable codes in the same area, you'll get something similar.

So after hearing a lot of this stuff for the first time, my first assumption was that MCI was keeping their card platform somewhere in New York. This might still be true, but whenever you dial a call that doesn't go through, you'll get a recording from random MCI tandems in the US. There's no pattern to where the calls go; they'll run through an MCI switch in California, Georgia, and everywhere in between, but the local New York codes always work. Could there be some special route for this area?

#2 dmine45

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 06:28 AM

I find this interesting... I have Verizon LD for my landline, primarily for testing purposes.

I've wondered if Verizon LD in Verizon native territory is just a loose connection of their local tandems? Sounds like the calling card platform is similar.

I haven't really experimented to calls originating or terminating in areas that aren't Verizon, but I've seen similar results of terminations that are like the ones that TP mentions in his post. Again, this acts if you're actually originating the call within that LATA and terminating on that LATA tandem. You can access things differently from the major IXCs because they seem to access the local network at different points.

I'll have to dig out my VZ calling card when I'm travelling and see what I get when I originate in areas that aren't Verizon.

#3 nyphonejacks

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 10:17 PM

On the off chance that people might've bought one to call Japan this month, I thought I might ask about some really weird things the system does.

-The system blocks all area codes and exchanges that're unassigned, but for some reason, area code 600 is an exception. It'll accept area code 600 plus anything you feel like giving it. Any speculation on why this might be? I think it might be something like the AT&T 959 code.


according to NANPA the NPA 600 is an easily recognizable non-geographic code that has been in service since 1/1/1993 in canada... http://nanpa.com/nas/public/npa_query_step2.do;nanpaid=Z741NMHMP1MyGY1Gw17HXjLh0wc7XyJMgHQbnnJjD1ZF3qGxT0FQ!-1023450390?method=displayNpa

and areacode.org/600 had this to say about the 600 NPA

Area code 600 is a non-geographic Canadian area code. It is reserved for specialized telecommunications services, such as cellular, ISDN, and teletype.


so i could understand it not blocking it automatically since it is a legitimate assigned NPA... but seems like it might be an NPA to poke around and try to find more information out about...

#4 ThoughtPhreaker

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 05:52 PM

according to NANPA the NPA 600 is an easily recognizable non-geographic code that has been in service since 1/1/1993 in canada...




Interesting. It's rated as a domestic call, though; it'll usually make sure you know you're paying more (or less) whenever you call Canada. Do you happen to know of any working 600 numbers? A test call might be able to solve this. I haven't found a single working number in there yet.


Again, this acts if you're actually originating the call within that LATA and terminating on that LATA tandem. You can access things differently from the major IXCs because they seem to access the local network at different points.




That's interesting, I thought this practice was typically only done in black routes?


I've wondered if Verizon LD in Verizon native territory is just a loose connection of their local tandems? Sounds like the calling card platform is similar.


Since Verizon LD's Washington, DC tandem is a 5ESS, and their local tandem is a DMS-200, I wouldn't think so. Isn't the Verizon LD network a combination of old GTE and Bell Atlantic stuff, though? I'm not too good with competitive long distance history.


In any case, though, the platform homes off the non-Worldcom MCI network, so this may not apply anyway.

#5 dmine45

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 10:50 AM

Since Verizon LD's Washington, DC tandem is a 5ESS, and their local tandem is a DMS-200, I wouldn't think so. Isn't the Verizon LD network a combination of old GTE and Bell Atlantic stuff, though? I'm not too good with competitive long distance history.


In any case, though, the platform homes off the non-Worldcom MCI network, so this may not apply anyway.


Just out of curioiusity, how do you know that the VZLD tandem in DC is a 5E and not a DMS? (or it just sounds that way when you hear a recording?)

It's weird though... VZ (at least in old BA territory where I live) had rebranded the old LDDS-Worldcom/MCI CIC (101-0555) as "a Verizon Long Distance network" with a male voice on the verification recording, while the one I get without a CIC code is a female voice.

The one I dial "straight" has the same "Verizon" female voice on the tandem trailers, while the one on the old LDDS-Worldcom/MCI CIC has MCI tandem recordings (but not necessarily the same tandem as 101-0222. So they're obviously two different networks or points of interconnection.

But VZLD does have their own "trailers" on their tandems, but I've also heard trailers on LATA tandems (Pittsburgh, for example) so I know that they tend to route things within their own existing network as much as possible, but I did hear the Pittsburgh VZLD tandem trailer with the 412-WE6-1212 testing that I did a few days ago. :)



So I'm interested on how/where VZLD "hands off" to and from the MCI network.

#6 ThoughtPhreaker

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Posted 02 April 2011 - 07:18 AM

Just out of curioiusity, how do you know that the VZLD tandem in DC is a 5E and not a DMS? (or it just sounds that way when you hear a recording?)



Two ways - if you listen closely, 5ESSes and DMS-100s both have very distinct types of rings, so discerning between the two is typically pretty simple. Also, a lot of 5ESSes, the VZLD DC tandem being no exception, have some really strange way of recording announcements. As far as I know, the announcement machine on most of these are digital; if you've ever heard a 5ESS read back a number using *69, it sounds like some run of the mill digital announcement machine. But all the custom announcements operating companies put on there (regardless of who actually owns the switch; even random CLECs with 5Es sound this way) sound like they were recorded using some kind of ancient magnetic tape system - there's loud hiss, print-through, and you'll even hear the sound of tape flutter or a tape winding up occasionally.

Just to compare, here's what one sounds like next to a generic digital machine - http://thoughtphreak...T_annccomp.flac

This all contrasts pretty starkly to the DMS-100, where an announcement card is just an FPGA that reads ADPCM off of a bank of EPROMs.

It's weird though... VZ (at least in old BA territory where I live) had rebranded the old LDDS-Worldcom/MCI CIC (101-0555) as "a Verizon Long Distance network" with a male voice on the verification recording, while the one I get without a CIC code is a female voice.


Huh, you've been hearing that too? It's strange, that popped up pretty recently, and it seems like you have to call from certain lines to get the real verification recording from the Worldcom tandem. I guess it doesn't help that I'm blocked from their CAC.

So I'm interested on how/where VZLD "hands off" to and from the MCI network.


Me too. The non-MCI/Worldcom Verizon network (101-5GTE or 101-NYNE[X] depending on your area) seems pretty widespread, but you're right, it's definitely connected to the MCI network somehow. Back when the 575 area code was introduced, I remember hearing the area code changed recording from some MCI tandem when I tried this. Maybe they just hand off to MCI when there's an area they don't have trunks to? I'd be interested to see how they react to calls to central Virginia - back when I lived in that region, both of those CACs would go somewhere else. My memory of this is pretty hazy, but I think one of them was Worldcom, and the other was Broad something. I think Broadwing.




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