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ANAC and stuff


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#1 Aivaras

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Posted 23 August 2010 - 05:17 PM

Hello, im really interested in phone phreaking, im from Lithuania, no one really knows phone phreaking.
The question is:how do you scan all those ANAC,ANI numbers and stuff? what soft do you use? is it free or is it something like VOIP and stuff? help the n00b please.Im really interested but dunno from where to start.

#2 ThoughtPhreaker

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Posted 28 August 2010 - 05:48 AM

I'd check the rates for your local/long distance calls. If you're not paying flat rate for either, it's a good idea to find a telltale sign from the switch that the number is going offhook. For example, on the 5ESSes in North America, the switch will usually prohibit you from flashing until whatever you called has answered.

Start with whatever seems the most interesting to you. If it's test numbers and the like you're interested in, I wrote an article a while back on how to hunt these sorts of things down. It's more US-centric, but it should be a good place to start. http://antilimit.net/index.php?post=11

If you've got some local exchange codes for us to work with, I might be able to help you look.



#3 Havoc

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Posted 31 August 2010 - 06:10 AM

well the situation in Europe is much different than on the other side of ocean; sure you can scan for american ANI and ANAC systems however it is way much funnier and better to look for something in your country; if you need CID only then there are a lot of voip systems

#4 SchippStrich

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 07:59 PM

Since we're already on topic, I decided to not create a new thread.

I've been wanting to scan my exchange, but never gotten around to doing it. I live in a rural area and I'm sure there are modems and things to be found.
My major question is if war-dialing is risky? Are there any methods I should go about using to avoid being noticed? Should I do hand scanning instead?

#5 nyphonejacks

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 08:24 PM

Since we're already on topic, I decided to not create a new thread.

I've been wanting to scan my exchange, but never gotten around to doing it. I live in a rural area and I'm sure there are modems and things to be found.
My major question is if war-dialing is risky? Are there any methods I should go about using to avoid being noticed? Should I do hand scanning instead?

i just recently got into scanning... i prefer to use prepaid cell phones to do scans by hand... but depending on what you are looking for if you can deal with unsupervised audio not being passed you can always hand scan with google voice with an ANI-F (if it is working, i always check first)

iwar seems pretty cool.. https://www.softwink.com/iwar/ and the presentation that the guys from telephreak did at HOPE got me obsessed with backspoofing, or CNAM information, so much i bought a domain name (freecnam.com) but never got a chance to do anything with it... plus it appears tnid.org is offering CNAM lookups again...

#6 ThoughtPhreaker

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Posted 02 September 2010 - 02:26 AM

I've been wanting to scan my exchange, but never gotten around to doing it. I live in a rural area and I'm sure there are modems and things to be found.
My major question is if war-dialing is risky? Are there any methods I should go about using to avoid being noticed? Should I do hand scanning instead?


If all you want to find is modems, a machine is fine, but unless you can listen with your own ears, you're inevitably going to miss tons of other things. I can't speak for other methods, but so far as I can tell if you're scanning using POTS, the only thing you should have to worry about is adding a privacy bit to avoid akward encounters with anybody whose phone you might happen to ring. Be advised that if you happen to be scanning a switch that acts as a 911 tandem, you will more than likely run into a PSAP after a while. While this isn't a big deal, just be prepared to excuse yourself, say it's a test call, or listen for a 911 operator coming from your modem's speaker if you choose to do it that way. Usually your telco will have the CLLI of the switch that handles this somewhere on their site. If they don't, your local government's website may have some PSAP numbers you can blacklist. Also, if you're scanning a remote, keep in mind you won't find much that's telco related aside from maybe a few milliwatts. Most of the interesting stuff is on the host switch.

If you're scanning your own office code, another thing to keep in mind is switch type - as I mentioned above, the 5ESS is cool enough to have a different scan rate for your line based on the call status. If you happen to be both served by a 5ESS and scanning your own office code, a not in service number has absolutely no release guard - even before the not in service recording starts up, you can give any tiny blip of on-hook, and it'll return you to dialtone. If it's ringing anything else, it'll hold your line for a few seconds or so to make sure you really meant to hang up, and didn't just hit the switch hook on accident.

Lastly, take a good look over the terms and conditions of whatever service you have. Local, long distance, cellular, voip, whatever. Most will have a section that details what is considered "inconsistent with normal usage", and what the consequences of screwing around too much might be. While I've never had an issue with the carriers I use, a friend of mine got some hassle from MCI for scanning on a residential account. 

well the situation in Europe is much different than on the other side of ocean; sure you can scan for american ANI and ANAC systems however it is way much funnier and better to look for something in your country



Yes, that's what I was implying. Though the article focuses mostly on domestic stuff, a lot of the same practices apply overseas. For example, with landline exchanges in Peru, 1000 will always be a milliwatt. 

#7 Havoc

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 06:47 AM

Yes, that's what I was implying. Though the article focuses mostly on domestic stuff, a lot of the same practices apply overseas. For example, with landline exchanges in Peru, 1000 will always be a milliwatt. 


in Poland it is mostly a number ending with digits 99 and sometimes 98

#8 JmanA9

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Posted 08 September 2010 - 10:37 AM

Also, if you're scanning a remote, keep in mind you won't find much that's telco related aside from maybe a few milliwatts. Most of the interesting stuff is on the host switch.

I have to agree, this is almost always true. I've never found anything interesting (that I remember) on a Verizon remote. However, some phone companies are weird. Take Windstream, for example. The official ANAC for my area is on a remote switch.




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