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855 toll free area code to go live oct 2nd


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#1 nyphonejacks

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Posted 17 August 2010 - 09:17 PM

http://nanpa.com/pdf/PL_407R1.pdf

the 855 toll free area code is set to go live on october 2 2010...

In November 1999, the Industry Numbering Committee directed NANPA to assign the 855 NPA code for toll-free service. On June 25, 2010, the Wireline Competition Bureau of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) authorized the opening of the 855 toll free code commencing at 12:00 p.m., Eastern Time, Friday, October 1, 2010.
On August 2, 2010, in response to the Alliance for Telecommunications Industry Solutions’ SMS/800 Number Administration Committee (SNAC) request to modify the October 1, 2010 date for opening the 855 toll free code, the FCC agreed to delay the opening by 24 hours, to Saturday, October 2, 2010, at 12:00 pm, to lessen the impact on regular customer activities that take place during the normal business week.



#2 decoder

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Posted 17 August 2010 - 10:39 PM

Does anyone recall that some numbers were actually assigned in 855, but then NANPA pulled the plug? Or did i dream that all up?

#3 dmine45

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 04:45 AM

I do think that test numbers were assigned to 855, as technically 866 and 855 were assigned at the same time. Many providers "opened them up" in their switches thinking it was going to be used at the same time as 866. BTW, test numbers tend to be in the 8yy-250-03xx range.

#4 rbcp

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 02:59 PM

I'm surprised we need any more toll-free exchanges. It's not like long distance costs much like it used to. Everyone is on cell phones now, so a number being "toll-free" makes little difference to most people.

#5 nyphonejacks

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Posted 18 August 2010 - 06:07 PM

I'm surprised we need any more toll-free exchanges. It's not like long distance costs much like it used to. Everyone is on cell phones now, so a number being "toll-free" makes little difference to most people.

i was just discussing this with the owner of a VoIP company that i contract for... i told him about them opening up the 855 area code, and then told him that it is pretty pointless in this day and age for "toll free" numbers, because cellular and VoIP services pretty much did away with long distance calling... he told me that the reason that toll free numbers are so important to businesses is not necessarily the toll free aspect of the number, but the non-geographical aspect of it - the caller does not need to know where they are calling... it gives a business a national presence...

but the "toll free" aspect of it is still retarded IMO because the owner of the number has to pay for the call... even if the caller would not normally be charged for calling the businesses local NPA phone number...

they should just create a non-geographical area code that the subscriber does not need to pay per minute or whatever, they could charge a premium for having one of these area codes, but it should still be cheaper than a toll free number for the subscriber....

#6 ThoughtPhreaker

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Posted 21 August 2010 - 05:00 PM

You're forgetting that while residential customers have been enjoying unlimited long distance since the late 90's, a large number of carriers who provide business services won't do that, as they tend to chew through enough minutes to make flat rate billing unprofitable unless you interconnect with people that re-originate through a skype client or something. 

As for cell phones, I can still see where a world without toll-free numbers would be a problem. I know a number of people who'll blow through their minute allowances very, very quickly.

Besides, while we may not necessarily need toll-frees, I get the feeling companies think they add to a professional image, or help perform route distribution to either multiple call centers, or over a carrier they're confident will survive an onslaught of calls like the one people who air TV commercials get. No, seriously, people actually call the numbers on those commercials. Someone who works for a company that provides service for just that sort of an arrangement tells me a typical commercial will generate about 200 calls when it airs. That's not the only case either. Try calling any large airline during the holidays, or when unusual weather conditions cancel a flight.

The great thing about a toll-free is it's non-geographic; you don't necessarily have to make it terminate to the same number from every location. If a business that gets insane amounts of traffic has a DID on, say, a switch in Colorado they use for customer service, and the terminating switch or the tandem it homes off encounters a circuit busy condition, they're sunk. With a toll-free, that doesn't necessarily have to be the case.



#7 nyphonejacks

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Posted 21 August 2010 - 07:55 PM

As for cell phones, I can still see where a world without toll-free numbers would be a problem. I know a number of people who'll blow through their minute allowances very, very quickly.



for cellular subscribers who do not have an unlimited plan, toll-free numbers are NOT toll free, minutes are still deducted from the account balance for toll free calls, just as they are for any other call...

#8 decoder

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Posted 22 August 2010 - 12:52 AM

I do think that test numbers were assigned to 855, as technically 866 and 855 were assigned at the same time. Many providers "opened them up" in their switches thinking it was going to be used at the same time as 866. BTW, test numbers tend to be in the 8yy-250-03xx range.


Yeah, I do recall certain 855-250-xxxx tests working, but I'm pretty sure I had seen adverts with 855 #'s for a split second. Probably phonesex companies who tried to secure good 855's that spelled something, but jumped the gun with their ads.

#9 ozlo

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Posted 24 August 2010 - 02:41 PM

Yeah, I do recall certain 855-250-xxxx tests working, but I'm pretty sure I had seen adverts with 855 #'s for a split second. Probably phonesex companies who tried to secure good 855's that spelled something, but jumped the gun with their ads.


You're right, you're not just imagining it. I recall a handful of commercials back in the day that were advertising 855 toll free numbers.

#10 kevinbrown

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Posted 04 July 2012 - 06:54 AM

i am agree with @dmine45, i think he has a point to notice regarding the 855 toll free number. what do you say about this?




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