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Hackers Wanted leaked


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#1 Famicoman

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Posted 22 May 2010 - 11:54 PM

That hacking documentary that was mentioned a few years ago, and somehow disappeared from the internet has finally been released... on TPB.

Threat Level Privacy, Crime and Security Online
Lost Hacking Documentary Surfaces on Pirate Bay

* By Kevin Poulsen Email Author
* May 20, 2010 |
* 12:00 pm |
* Categories: intellectual property
*

After collecting cobwebs in a studio vault for the better part of a decade, an unreleased documentary on the 2003 hacking scene leaked onto the Pirate Bay Thursday.

Narrated by actor Kevin Spacey, the 90-minute Hackers Wanted follows the exploits of Adrian Lamo, who pleaded guilty in 2004 to cracking the internal network of The New York Times. The film was produced by Spacey’s Trigger Street production company, and includes interviews with Kevin Rose and Steve Wozniak.

Lamo says the film had been bogged down by conflicts among the producers and crew. “It’s ironic that a film about overcoming barriers, about new technologies, about thinking differently, had to come to the public eye by being hacked out of the hands of people who, after making a film about the free flow of information, tried to lock away that information forever,” says Lamo. “The truth tends to itself.”

Lamo adds that he had nothing to do with the leak.

Lamo made his mark early in the decade with a string of brazen hacks against large companies, characterized by a flair and sense of humor that appear quaint in today’s era of for-profit hacking and multi-million credit card theft.

In 2001, when he was 20, the hacker snuck into an unprotected content-management tool at Yahoo’s news site to tinker with a Reuters story, adding a made-up quote by then-Attorney General John Ashcroft. Lamo went on to stage other hacks, alerting the press to each one and often working with the hacked company to close the security holes he exploited. His targets included Microsoft, Excite@Home, Worldcom and The New York Times, which pressed charges.

Unemployed and prone to wander the country by Greyhound, Lamo gained the appellation “the Homeless Hacker.” When he surrendered to face charges for the Times hack, the Trigger Street camera crew was in tow. He was ultimately sentenced to six months home confinement at his parents’ house and two years of probation.

Read More http://www.wired.com.../#ixzz0oj1zc8VU


http://torrentfreak....torrent-100520/
http://www.wired.com.../hackers-wante/

#2 tekio

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Posted 23 May 2010 - 06:51 AM

Never even heard of it, but gonna go watch it now. thanx!

#3 frogbong

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Posted 23 May 2010 - 05:29 PM

I especially enjoyed where the perspective of a hacker is addressed from a sort of analytical/philosophical point of view. Also, it is important that more people acknowledge how much unjustified control the U.S. Government has over our Amendment Rights(in exchange for a feeling of 'security'/sense of control in our lives) and how inefficient their methods and unqualified their 'skill-set' to enforce these laws against 'hacking' and protect good people from other quite plausible terrorist acts is futile. Sorry, I had to get that off my chest. Seriously though, people need to wake up. The laws of god are above the laws of man, and we all know what the right thing to do is. The problem is everyone wants to play god.

Edited by frogbong, 23 May 2010 - 05:31 PM.


#4 m3747r0n

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Posted 24 May 2010 - 03:02 AM

I think the film had some good points, but I have no idea what Leo Laporte has to do with hacking, or why they kept going back to him through out the documentary. Also the whole thing about Russian hackers being so poor when they were growing up and not having access to computers, that apparently, the ones backed by the Russian mob can execute their own code inside their heads, was a little odd. Are we to expect a population of hackers running Linux on their brains, maybe inside a VM, lol.

#5 frogbong

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Posted 24 May 2010 - 12:42 PM

I think the film had some good points, but I have no idea what Leo Laporte has to do with hacking, or why they kept going back to him through out the documentary. Also the whole thing about Russian hackers being so poor when they were growing up and not having access to computers, that apparently, the ones backed by the Russian mob can execute their own code inside their heads, was a little odd. Are we to expect a population of hackers running Linux on their brains, maybe inside a VM, lol.

Leo Laporte seems to be the cornerstone of 'blackhat' gossip. Talk about a guy that doesn't really understand wtf is going on. Also, your point about the Russians running code in their heads makes me think about Ghost in the Shell; particularly the potential use of bio-hardware/software in our near future.

#6 MrFluffy

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Posted 25 May 2010 - 10:45 AM

You can get to that point doing assembler when you can just see how it should be formed and it just comes out naturally without seemingly having to think in any real depth. How you get there with nothing to gain the earlier steps to get you that level I have no idea, but poverty is one hell of a driver for lots of amazing things...
Another area where this manifests itself is with morse code, after about 10 words per minute, you cant hear dots and dashes fast enough, so your brain start to hear the letters as sounds. When the rate goes higher and higher, you start to hear individual words in cw, rather than individual letters and joining them up. The guys doing 60+ wpm are hearing words not individual letters for sure or their brains would not be able to process it in time.

We're born not even being able to speak, its amazing how extensible we are with the right training...

#7 PurpleJesus

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Posted 25 May 2010 - 07:20 PM

You can get to that point doing assembler when you can just see how it should be formed and it just comes out naturally without seemingly having to think in any real depth. How you get there with nothing to gain the earlier steps to get you that level I have no idea, but poverty is one hell of a driver for lots of amazing things...
Another area where this manifests itself is with morse code, after about 10 words per minute, you cant hear dots and dashes fast enough, so your brain start to hear the letters as sounds. When the rate goes higher and higher, you start to hear individual words in cw, rather than individual letters and joining them up. The guys doing 60+ wpm are hearing words not individual letters for sure or their brains would not be able to process it in time.

We're born not even being able to speak, its amazing how extensible we are with the right training...


Just to add to that about CW. My Dad told me of this guy he knew during the Vietnam war. He could copy down CW with one hand, while reading a magazine in the other. But he couldn't understand the first bit of radio theory.

#8 livinded

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 01:00 AM


You can get to that point doing assembler when you can just see how it should be formed and it just comes out naturally without seemingly having to think in any real depth. How you get there with nothing to gain the earlier steps to get you that level I have no idea, but poverty is one hell of a driver for lots of amazing things...
Another area where this manifests itself is with morse code, after about 10 words per minute, you cant hear dots and dashes fast enough, so your brain start to hear the letters as sounds. When the rate goes higher and higher, you start to hear individual words in cw, rather than individual letters and joining them up. The guys doing 60+ wpm are hearing words not individual letters for sure or their brains would not be able to process it in time.

We're born not even being able to speak, its amazing how extensible we are with the right training...


Just to add to that about CW. My Dad told me of this guy he knew during the Vietnam war. He could copy down CW with one hand, while reading a magazine in the other. But he couldn't understand the first bit of radio theory.

That's not all that difficult to believe. Decoding CW is really just a matter of pattern recognition, and being able to do it that fast while multitasking is fairly impressive, but the fact that he couldn't understand any of the radio theory makes perfect sense. Understanding CW is simply pattern recognition while understanding the concepts behind radio data transfer requires at least some slightly advanced math as well as physics. All in all I thought the movie was interesting and it's unfortunate that it wont ever be released officially or in a higher quality/finished state. I thought that a lot of the content was interesting, however I don't agree with a lot of it. There was a lot of evangelizing of Lamo's actions which is really just stupid. Sure his intent may not have been to deface or or disrupt service of any companies, but I think the individual who talked about his narcissistic personality had it right on. It was all a game to him proving that he was smarter than the people getting paid to do it. Learning more about Lamo and what he did, I immediately drew connections to the guy from into the wild who left his privileged, although dysfunctional, life to explore the world. I think that a lot of the decisions made were very self centered with very little consideration into the effects their actions had.




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