Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

BackTrack on Netbooks


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 Kasterborus

Kasterborus

    Will I break 10 posts?

  • Members
  • 6 posts
  • Country:
  • Gender:Male

Posted 09 September 2009 - 06:20 AM

Hey everyone,

I was just wondering if anyone out there had any experience with installing BackTrack Linux onto a NetBook, and what netbooks work best with BackTrack. Basically I want something that I can install BackTrack nativley onto and have everything work pretty much without much tweaking.

I am also thinking that if someone gives me a hand with this (Basically by telling me what works) I wouldn't mind buying a large batch of these NetBooks, loading BackTrack onto them and selling them here on BinRev (If I'm allowed) and/or online to those who are interested.

Note: I am in Australia, so only NetBooks that are available here I would be able to purchase and work on, but I could feasibly ship anywhere, would just be up to you to get adapters and stuff for the Netbook at the other end.

I would like best to get hold of a netbook that comes to under $1,000 AUD, after all, for what the use will be, expensive isn't really needed, and there is the possibility of them being damaged/lost/stolen/destroyed/seized...

-Kasterborus

#2 trevelyn

trevelyn

    mad 1337

  • Members
  • 125 posts
  • Location:Pittsburgh, Pa

Posted 09 September 2009 - 10:21 AM

Hey everyone,

I was just wondering if anyone out there had any experience with installing BackTrack Linux onto a NetBook, and what netbooks work best with BackTrack. Basically I want something that I can install BackTrack nativley onto and have everything work pretty much without much tweaking.

I am also thinking that if someone gives me a hand with this (Basically by telling me what works) I wouldn't mind buying a large batch of these NetBooks, loading BackTrack onto them and selling them here on BinRev (If I'm allowed) and/or online to those who are interested.

Note: I am in Australia, so only NetBooks that are available here I would be able to purchase and work on, but I could feasibly ship anywhere, would just be up to you to get adapters and stuff for the Netbook at the other end.

I would like best to get hold of a netbook that comes to under $1,000 AUD, after all, for what the use will be, expensive isn't really needed, and there is the possibility of them being damaged/lost/stolen/destroyed/seized...

-Kasterborus



If you are deploying your netbooks as all the same brand/model/make etc, you don't really need BackTrack on them. Most netbooks come with some kind of Linux pre-installed, usually a debian based version (making the addition of packages extremely easy!). If you simply build upon the Linux that it comes with, this gives you the advantage of having all proper drivers installed and working perfectly.

Once you get one you know works, simply install as many security based tools as possible. you can even boot into the BT cd and copy a few directories that are loaded with scripts, like
/pentest for example. To get WiFi to inject, you can check here

http://www.aircrack-...install_drivers

to patch your driver for the netbook you purchase. Once you have a good working machine, simply ghost the HDD so you can blow the image onto the other netbooks with ease.

I mean, that's what I would do, to save time/money/support. You can go the BT way if you want, but it seems like an unnecessary step.

#3 Colonel Panic

Colonel Panic

    Hakker addict

  • Members
  • 607 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:IN YR BROWSER, SAYIN SUM SHIT

Posted 09 September 2009 - 01:43 PM

A friend and I went to Best Buy to look at netbooks. We browsed the "mobile computing" department and whenever I found a laptop I was interested in, we would restart it, set it to boot from USB, then reboot it from my friend's Backtrack 3 thumbdrive. The main idea was to determine how well Backtrack (or Linux in general) would work with the various hardware configurations. We tried out Backtrack on several of the netbooks and laptops there and it appeared to run fine on all of them.

Mind you, this was Backtrack 3 (which is based on the Slax distro) and not 4 (which I believe is based on either Ubuntu or Debian). We didn't have a lot of time to test out all the features of the distro, but it basically seemed to work on all the machines with no major hardware issues.

I ended up buying the Dell Mini 9 despite the lack of wireless monitor mode and packet injection. Turns out the internal wireless adapter is a newer Broadcom chipset (bcm 4312) which does not support those features, but works fine for normal networking purposes. I ended up buying an external USB wireless adapter for wifi cracking, but everything else works fine.

Edited by Colonel Panic, 09 September 2009 - 04:22 PM.


#4 Ohm

Ohm

    I could have written a book with all of these posts

  • Members
  • 3,209 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Maine, USA

Posted 09 September 2009 - 04:54 PM

I find BT is kind of klunky and unpolished for using as a primary distro. It's just as easy to install another distro (Ubuntu, for example) and install the tools you need from BT on that distro. BT is great for a live distro, but if you're going to install a distro, there are much better choices. And remember that you don't need all the tools that come with BT. I don't even know what 90% of them do. You only need the ones that you know how to use, and those you can install yourself.

#5 trevelyn

trevelyn

    mad 1337

  • Members
  • 125 posts
  • Location:Pittsburgh, Pa

Posted 09 September 2009 - 05:21 PM

I find BT is kind of klunky and unpolished for using as a primary distro. It's just as easy to install another distro (Ubuntu, for example) and install the tools you need from BT on that distro. BT is great for a live distro, but if you're going to install a distro, there are much better choices. And remember that you don't need all the tools that come with BT. I don't even know what 90% of them do. You only need the ones that you know how to use, and those you can install yourself.


Yeah he's right, and Ubuntu is Debian. And why would you mass distribute Netbooks with external cards? Also, did you test ALL things, like even if the video resolution was fine, what about sound? what about the webcam? what about the sd slots?? seriously, working with hardware like, you should consider using the Linux that comes with the Netbook. The kernels and all drivers are all specifically designed by the manufacturer for the hardware.

Also, I think BackTrack creators made a big list of tools on their site somewhere i'm sure you can find. You cannot submit to DistroWatch without one.

#6 Colonel Panic

Colonel Panic

    Hakker addict

  • Members
  • 607 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:IN YR BROWSER, SAYIN SUM SHIT

Posted 09 September 2009 - 05:23 PM

I find BT is kind of klunky and unpolished for using as a primary distro. It's just as easy to install another distro (Ubuntu, for example) and install the tools you need from BT on that distro. BT is great for a live distro, but if you're going to install a distro, there are much better choices...

This is true. Backtrack is really intended more as a "pocket toolbox" for pen-testing in much the same way Knoppix was originally intended as a toolbox for IT troubleshooting.

If you're planning on setting up a bunch of pen-testing netbook machines, you'd be better off installing a good general-use distro and then downloading and installing whatever specific security tools you need. Once you've made the ideal setup for your purposes and want to duplicate the OS and software packages onto other machines, you can use something like Partimage, G4L, or Clonezilla to do that.

I rather like the idea of getting quantities of nice netbooks cheap enough to turn a profit, installing custom software on them and reselling them. It might work as a business model, but I don't know how well it would fly in the hacker community.

While you obviously have the hacker mindset to embark on a project like this, remember that most others in this community are also tinkerers at heart and love to build stuff, swap out OS distros, code their own custom tools, etc. Most of these folks like to set up their own stuff themselves, exactly how they like it. I don't know how many people would pay for a netbook running BT4 shipped halfway 'round the world, when they could just buy the same machine at Fry's and install whatever distro they want.

You might be able to apply this business model to other markets though. I'm sure you could market the "hackbooks" in the back of 2600 magazine to the script-kiddies, or make a variety of custom installations for different purposes (electronics engineering, personal/business organization, math/science, ham radio, etc.) and sell those in various trade magazines. It's a good idea.

Edited by Colonel Panic, 09 September 2009 - 05:25 PM.


#7 Kasterborus

Kasterborus

    Will I break 10 posts?

  • Members
  • 6 posts
  • Country:
  • Gender:Male

Posted 09 September 2009 - 07:18 PM

If you are deploying your netbooks as all the same brand/model/make etc, you don't really need BackTrack on them. Most netbooks come with some kind of Linux pre-installed, usually a debian based version (making the addition of packages extremely easy!). If you simply build upon the Linux that it comes with, this gives you the advantage of having all proper drivers installed and working perfectly.


The problem I have found in the ones that I can get are that they either come with stripped down Windoze, or a really stripped down Linux that has a lot of pretty shiny graphics and is so stripped down you can use an IM Client, a Word Processor, a Web Browser and play Solitaire...and that's about it...I did ask them about one that had Windoze on it and they said "The manufacturer does put a version of Linux on it, but at the cost of not being able to use Bluetooth, Wireless and Webcam" and I pretty much thought "Then why bother??"

A friend and I went to Best Buy to look at netbooks. We browsed the "mobile computing" department and whenever I found a laptop I was interested in, we would restart it, set it to boot from USB, then reboot it from my friend's Backtrack 3 thumbdrive. The main idea was to determine how well Backtrack (or Linux in general) would work with the various hardware configurations. We tried out Backtrack on several of the netbooks and laptops there and it appeared to run fine on all of them.


I would have tried this, I actually made a bootable BackTrack 3 drive, but when I went into the computer stores, the Netbooks I wanted to try had no batteries and no power, so I was forced to ask them if I could try it,to which I got a response that "Once they are booted into Windows we have to send them back to have them re-imaged" and they could not grasp that I would not be needing Windows, I would be booting from a thumb drive. According to the people I spoke to (Three different sales people in one store, five in the next (none of the stores have IT staff)) all computers need Windows to run, you can't run a computer without it...it was about there that I lost what remaining faith I had in humanity...

I find BT is kind of klunky and unpolished for using as a primary distro. It's just as easy to install another distro (Ubuntu, for example) and install the tools you need from BT on that distro.


Well, I don't actually plan to use it for anything other than its intended purpose, I have a massive desktop at home and an awesome laptop that I use, but the laptop gets clunky when I want to pentest, so I would rather a netbook. Plus a USB drive hanging out of my Lappie gets annoying.

I rather like the idea of getting quantities of nice netbooks cheap enough to turn a profit, installing custom software on them and reselling them. It might work as a business model, but I don't know how well it would fly in the hacker community.

While you obviously have the hacker mindset to embark on a project like this, remember that most others in this community are also tinkerers at heart and love to build stuff, swap out OS distros, code their own custom tools, etc. Most of these folks like to set up their own stuff themselves, exactly how they like it. I don't know how many people would pay for a netbook running BT4 shipped halfway 'round the world, when they could just buy the same machine at Fry's and install whatever distro they want.

You might be able to apply this business model to other markets though. I'm sure you could market the "hackbooks" in the back of 2600 magazine to the script-kiddies, or make a variety of custom installations for different purposes (electronics engineering, personal/business organization, math/science, ham radio, etc.) and sell those in various trade magazines. It's a good idea.


Well, I know it probably won't fly well in the hacker community, after all, as you said, most true hackers like to make their own machines how they want them, and use the tools that THEY want to use. They are not my intended market, no offense, but they can handle themselves.

My intended market IS the Script Kiddies who just want to play and the businesses that have an IT department that would love to PenTest but don't want to set up the equipment, if I can turn to them and say "Here is a perfectly working NetBook designed to do exactly what you want it to do, and it's only $1000 AUD" then most places I know would jump at it. I even know a computer store that would sell them (He says he would sell them through his store for me so I don't have to set up a business and such, but he won't build them or help me research the building because that would take too much of his time, he is 1 guy running his whole computer sales and repair store, so he doesn't have the time)

I have an idea what most true hackers will think of me selling to Script Kiddies, they probably won't like it one bit. Hell, even I don't really like the idea, but there's a market there, and in true capitalist fashion, I plan to exploit said market. That said, I'm not gonna SHOW them how to use it, and I'll also see a lawyer and have him draw me up something that says that "Yes, I sold them a security and penetration testing netbook, the use of said netbook is that it will be used ethically and legally, if the buyer wishes to use it to break the law, it is not my problem" sort of thing, but in long winded legal jargon. Then when I sell each one, I'll have them sign that first. Just to cover my ass when they do something stupid and get arrested.

-Kasterborus

Edited by Kasterborus, 09 September 2009 - 07:20 PM.


#8 dinscurge

dinscurge

    "I Hack, therefore, I am"

  • Members
  • 938 posts
  • Country:
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:the bunker

Posted 09 September 2009 - 10:05 PM

basically he's saying is hackers are too lazy/too leet to just use the os on it, say the eee no one uses xandros because of the tard wm it uses by default but their to leet to google for 5 seconds to find out you can enable full kde in like 5 seconds and install any application on ubuntu without being so slow and working perfectly with the hardware. no thier leet they just put on ubuntu </satire> in all seriousness everyone is a skiddie i mean if you put eeedebian on the netbooks what do you install what does everybody use if they are a skiddie or uberleet, wireshark, kismet, airsnort, nmap ect. all you have to do is configure it properly even hackers will buy it if the price is low enough/ dont want to go thru the effort of custom compiling kernel with drivers. if you put it on the low end netbooks like 2-4gb ssd it'd be great because its the same size(in bytes) as any other live distro but it already has tools on it instead of your open office bs.
no way id want backtrack on mine with 250gb sata have enough space to install anything i want. but if i had a 2-4gb id probably have it on.

Edited by dinscurge, 09 September 2009 - 10:07 PM.


#9 Kasterborus

Kasterborus

    Will I break 10 posts?

  • Members
  • 6 posts
  • Country:
  • Gender:Male

Posted 09 September 2009 - 10:16 PM

So the general consensus is that I should grab a regular *nix netbook, grab the list of tools off the BT OS and then install them on the Native OS?

But yeah, for the really cheap and nasty ones, I want to make netbooks that the sole purpose of their existence is to be used to pentest, they're not gonna be used for ANYTHING else.

-Kasterborus

Edited by Kasterborus, 09 September 2009 - 10:18 PM.


#10 chown

chown

    SUPR3M3 31337 Mack Daddy P1MP

  • Moderating Team
  • 493 posts
  • Country:
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Floating on a sea of hydrogen

Posted 12 September 2009 - 05:50 AM

Any specific netbooks whose wifi supports packet injection?

#11 tekio

tekio

    5(R1P7 |<1DD13

  • Binrev Financier
  • 1,116 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Blue Nowhere

Posted 12 September 2009 - 06:34 AM

Any specific netbooks whose wifi supports packet injection?

My Sony VAIO VGN-P688 has an atheros that supports packet injection with patched Mad-WiFi drivers... However, a guy at work has one with a different chipset... For about $30.00 one can get an Edimax with an RT73 chipset that supports injection too: http://www.newegg.co...N82E16833315075

Might want to do some research before purchasing though, as manufacturers are known for switching chipsets a lot.

Edited by tekio, 12 September 2009 - 06:38 AM.


#12 Kasterborus

Kasterborus

    Will I break 10 posts?

  • Members
  • 6 posts
  • Country:
  • Gender:Male

Posted 12 September 2009 - 07:36 AM

Might want to do some research before purchasing though, as manufacturers are known for switching chipsets a lot.


That was one of the reasons I asked here, I was hoping someone here would have tried this. Though the idea of getting one that Already has a Native *nix on it and then shoving the programs from BT on it does also sound tempting...

-Kasterborus

#13 tekio

tekio

    5(R1P7 |<1DD13

  • Binrev Financier
  • 1,116 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Blue Nowhere

Posted 12 September 2009 - 07:46 AM


Might want to do some research before purchasing though, as manufacturers are known for switching chipsets a lot.


That was one of the reasons I asked here, I was hoping someone here would have tried this. Though the idea of getting one that Already has a Native *nix on it and then shoving the programs from BT on it does also sound tempting...

-Kasterborus


You'd be better of using a USB adapter than the built in one... There are several that allow external antennas and one with the RTL8187 is more sensitive than most anything that will come built-in. that Edimax that I posted should be good to go with packet injection. I've never heard about one with anything but the RT73 Ralink. Backtrack should be alright with any Atheros WiFi, but the reception will be shitty with an internal.

#14 joethehax0r

joethehax0r

    the 0ne

  • Members
  • 1 posts
  • Country:
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Massachusetts

Posted 28 October 2009 - 06:49 PM

I know this post is in regards to BT3 but I found an awesome article on how to install BT4 with XP dualboot on a EEE PC availible at:
http://www.computere...nux-windows-xp/

Edited by joethehax0r, 28 October 2009 - 06:49 PM.


#15 Wolfman1984

Wolfman1984

    HACK THE PLANET!

  • Members
  • 60 posts
  • Location:fangtastic.org

Posted 28 October 2009 - 07:32 PM

The Wolfman is running the USB version of BT3 on my older Asus EEE 701 (the original). The Wolfman is also able to inject packets no problem using the Wifi drivers provided with the distro.

I could be wrong, but I seem to recall the BT3 distro being delayed because they wanted to ensure everything was compatible to the new Asus EEE's which where just coming out on the market. If this is still true, BT4 may be very comptable to the Asus EEE series netbooks.




BinRev is hosted by the great people at Lunarpages!