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#1 Aghaster

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 12:52 PM

I got this email in my mailbox today, I think it may be spam but I have also registered on a couple of shell account websites recently. The service offered looks amazing (there's a UltraSPARC T1!) and costs $100. With a couple of friends the lifetime membership wouldn't cost that much. The only thing is that I do not know if this service is to be trusted. The domain name appears to have been registered on august 31th, so it is very recent and there is no review on the internet yet to say if this service is real. Can anybody confirm or infirm the existence of this service?

Dear Developer,

You might have been looking for a stable Unix/Linux shell service for a while. Now, AnyShell.Net is right here to fulfill your needs.

AnyShell.Net is an online community of developers, students and teachers who are interested in Unix/Linux and other open source technologies. By providing access to a variety of Unix/Linux systems and a web development environment, AnyShell.Net removes the barrier to learn and use these technologies for those who can not afford their own computer system, or do not have control over the computer they are using.

In short, AnyShell.Net provides SSH/VNC access to a variety of Unix/Linux servers at a life time access membership fee. Every registered (and activated) user has his/her own home directory with 1 GB disk quota, and a web development environment that supports HTML, PHP, Perl, JSP with MySQL as the back-end database. Currently AnyShell.Net provides access to AIX 5 Release 3, FreeBSD 7.2, Solaris 10 Update 2, OpenSolaris 2009.06, Fedora Core 10, Ubuntu 8.04, and Debian Linux for MIPS. All these servers have fully supported development environment for C/C++, Java, Fortran and other programming languages.

You might already own or have access to a couple of Unix/Linux systems. So, why would you need the service from AnyShell.Net? The reasons are simple:

1. Your Unix/Linux systems might not be always accessible from anywhere at anytime.

2. You might need occasional access to other Unix/Linux systems but do not want to install them for various reasons.

3. You might need occasional access to other processors such as Power 5 (running AIX 5.3), UltraSparc T1 (running Solaris 10 for UltraSparc), or MIPS (running Debian Linux for MIPS).

4. You might need to test your program/application on different OS's and different CPU's.

5. AnyShell.Net also provides a web development environment that is handy and easy to use at any time, from any location.

AnyShell.Net life time access membership costs you only $100. Sign Up now and enjoy the convenience brought to you by AnyShell.Net today.

Best regards,

AnyShell.Net
http://www.anyshell.net/



#2 Gr4v170N

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 12:59 PM

I got this email in my mailbox today, I think it may be spam but I have also registered on a couple of shell account websites recently. The service offered looks amazing (there's a UltraSPARC T1!) and costs $100. With a couple of friends the lifetime membership wouldn't cost that much. The only thing is that I do not know if this service is to be trusted. The domain name appears to have been registered on august 31th, so it is very recent and there is no review on the internet yet to say if this service is real. Can anybody confirm or infirm the existence of this service?


Dear Developer,

You might have been looking for a stable Unix/Linux shell service for a while. Now, AnyShell.Net is right here to fulfill your needs.

AnyShell.Net is an online community of developers, students and teachers who are interested in Unix/Linux and other open source technologies. By providing access to a variety of Unix/Linux systems and a web development environment, AnyShell.Net removes the barrier to learn and use these technologies for those who can not afford their own computer system, or do not have control over the computer they are using.

In short, AnyShell.Net provides SSH/VNC access to a variety of Unix/Linux servers at a life time access membership fee. Every registered (and activated) user has his/her own home directory with 1 GB disk quota, and a web development environment that supports HTML, PHP, Perl, JSP with MySQL as the back-end database. Currently AnyShell.Net provides access to AIX 5 Release 3, FreeBSD 7.2, Solaris 10 Update 2, OpenSolaris 2009.06, Fedora Core 10, Ubuntu 8.04, and Debian Linux for MIPS. All these servers have fully supported development environment for C/C++, Java, Fortran and other programming languages.

You might already own or have access to a couple of Unix/Linux systems. So, why would you need the service from AnyShell.Net? The reasons are simple:

1. Your Unix/Linux systems might not be always accessible from anywhere at anytime.

2. You might need occasional access to other Unix/Linux systems but do not want to install them for various reasons.

3. You might need occasional access to other processors such as Power 5 (running AIX 5.3), UltraSparc T1 (running Solaris 10 for UltraSparc), or MIPS (running Debian Linux for MIPS).

4. You might need to test your program/application on different OS's and different CPU's.

5. AnyShell.Net also provides a web development environment that is handy and easy to use at any time, from any location.

AnyShell.Net life time access membership costs you only $100. Sign Up now and enjoy the convenience brought to you by AnyShell.Net today.

Best regards,

AnyShell.Net
http://www.anyshell.net/


If it were real, why would it have just been registered yesterday? I doubt they could have a network of teachers/students/developers already using their service if they only got it public yesterday. Or did I miss something..

#3 Aghaster

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 01:10 PM

If it were real, why would it have just been registered yesterday? I doubt they could have a network of teachers/students/developers already using their service if they only got it public yesterday. Or did I miss something..


The service looks brand new, yeah. I don't think they do have a community of people already, their wording must be what they intend to become once people start registering. It does make sense that if people pay $100 to register they can provide access to those great machines, but if it's a scam they can also make a lot of money. I guess it'll take one or two weeks before people start reviewing them.

Here is the list of servers they give access to:

Server Name : t1000.anyshell.net
Server Model : Sun Fire T1000
Processor : 1 Sun UltraSparc T1 @ 1.0 GHz (8 cores per CPU times 4 threads per core)
Memory : 8 GB
Operating System : Solaris 10 for Sparc Update 2

Server Name : x4100.anyshell.net
Server Model : Sun Fire X4100
Processor : 2 AMD Opteron 280 @ 2.4 GHz (2 cores per CPU times 1 thread per core)
Memory : 4 GB
Operating System : Solaris 10 for x86/x64 Update 2

Server Name : aix.anyshell.net
Server Model : IBM P510
Processor : 2 IBM Power 5 @ 2.0 GHz (2 cores per CPU times 1 thread per core)
Memory : 2 GB
Operating System : AIX 5 Release 3

Server Name : freebsd.anyshell.net
Server Model : DELL PowerEdge 860
Processor : 1 Intel Xeon 3050 @ 2.13 GHz (2 cores per CPU times 1 thread per core)
Memory : 8 GB
Operating System : FreeBSD 7.2

Server Name : fedora.anyshell.net
Server Model : DELL PowerEdge 860
Processor : 1 Intel Xeon 3050 @ 2.13 GHz (2 cores per CPU times 1 thread per core)
Memory : 8 GB
Operating System : Fedora Core 10

Server Name : ubuntu.anyshell.net
Server Model : DELL PowerEdge 860
Processor : 1 Intel Xeon 3050 @ 2.13 GHz (2 cores per CPU times 1 thread per core)
Memory : 8 GB
Operating System : Ubuntu 8.04

Server Name : opensolaris.anyshell.net
Server Model : DELL PowerEdge 860
Processor : 1 Intel Xeon 3050 @ 2.13 GHz (2 cores per CPU times 1 thread per core)
Memory : 8 GB
Operating System : OpenSolaris 09.06

Server Name : China Loongson CPU Servers: 192.168.1.30/31/32 (Connect from AnyShell.Net Servers Only)
Server Model : Loongson
Processor : 1 Loongson 2E @ 666 MHz (1 core per CPU times 1 thread per core)
Memory : 256 MB
Operating System : Debian Linux for MIPS


Those are expensive servers, but at $100 per membership they can afford them. Cheap shell accounts offer access to much less powerful machines but the membership cost is very inexpensive. You get what you pay for.

#4 Ohm

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 02:58 PM

These shell services come and go, emphasis on go. Who knows if this startup will be around in even a month or two? Go with an established shell provider. I wouldn't give them any of my money.

#5 Aghaster

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 03:11 PM

These shell services come and go, emphasis on go. Who knows if this startup will be around in even a month or two? Go with an established shell provider. I wouldn't give them any of my money.


I searched for different shell account providers, but I couldn't find anything interesting except polarhome.com that has a wide variety of UNIX systems. The problem is that you can only register by sending a registration form through snail mail. I don't get it... why is there no online registration system? If there is it is not easy to find on their website. I also couldn't find anywhere on the site if I have to choose one of the available systems or if I get access to all of them if I register.

I would pay for a shell account service that provides access to multiple exotic UNIX systems. Very powerful systems such as the UltraSPARC T1 is also something that interests me. Do you have any recommendations?

#6 Ohm

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 03:14 PM

A lot of them only have snail mail registrations. It cuts down on skiddies, most of which can't be bothered to send in physical mail. So that's not uncommon.

#7 Aghaster

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 03:33 PM

A lot of them only have snail mail registrations. It cuts down on skiddies, most of which can't be bothered to send in physical mail. So that's not uncommon.


It's not so bad to use snail mail if it's really worth it. I found on polarhome.com that the lifetime membership fee should be 10$ CAN (10 units of your local currency, they have a weird policy) per account per host. Here's the list:

Host: Linux/RedHat [ ] FreeBSD[ ] OpenVMS/Alpha[ ] AIX [ ]
Linux/Debian [ ] OpenBSD[ ] OpenVMS/VAX [ ] QNX [ ]
Linux/Mandriva[ ] NetBSD [ ] OPENSTEP [ ] IRIX [ ]
Linux/SuSE [ ] Solaris[ ] Ultrix [ ] HP-UX[ ]
Linux/Ubuntu [ ] Plan9 [ ] Tru64 [ ]


I'd like to get an account for AIX and HP-UX. I do not know about OpenVMS, OPENSTEP, Ultrix, Tru64 and QNX though. What's the difference between OpenVMS Alpha and VAX?

#8 johnnymanson

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 08:18 PM

If I remember correctly VMS was a network operating system used by the Digital Equipment Corporation. I used this system back in the late 80s and early 90s. It was a great OS in it's time, but is pretty much obsolete now. The Alpha and VAX were different hardware systems that could run VMS. Google OpenVMS for more info. It's probably only of historical interest now.

#9 Aghaster

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 10:36 PM

If I remember correctly VMS was a network operating system used by the Digital Equipment Corporation. I used this system back in the late 80s and early 90s. It was a great OS in it's time, but is pretty much obsolete now. The Alpha and VAX were different hardware systems that could run VMS. Google OpenVMS for more info. It's probably only of historical interest now.


Hum... If I look on Wikipedia and on HP's website OpenVMS doesn't look dead at all. I know someone that works for HP and I asked him and he said that HP-UX was the shit. I'd get a HP-UX account along with an AIX account, and maybe OpenVMS because it looks cool.

#10 Aghaster

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 12:46 AM

I just thought of using nmap's fingerprinting feature to see if the AnyShell.Net servers are what they claim to be. nmap fingerprinting isn't always accurate, but the results are quite satisfying:

debian:/home/aghaster# nmap -O aix.anyshell.net

Starting Nmap 4.68 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2009-09-02 01:36 EDT
Interesting ports on 121.194.13.17:
Not shown: 1714 filtered ports
PORT   STATE SERVICE
22/tcp open  ssh
Warning: OSScan results may be unreliable because we could not find at least 1 open and 1 closed port
Device type: general purpose|VoIP phone
Running (JUST GUESSING) : FreeBSD 5.x|4.X|6.X (97%), IBM AIX 5.X|4.X (91%), Apple Mac OS X 10.4.X (88%), Polycom embedded (88%)
Aggressive OS guesses: FreeBSD 5.5-STABLE (97%), IBM AIX 5.3 (91%), IBM AIX 5.3 ML 4 (90%), Apple Mac OS X 10.4.8 (Tiger) (PowerPC) (88%), IBM AIX AIX 4.3 (88%), Polycom SoundPoint IP 430 VoIP phone (88%), FreeBSD 4.3-RELEASE (87%), IBM AIX 5.2 on Power5 (87%), FreeBSD 6.1-RELEASE (87%)
No exact OS matches for host (test conditions non-ideal).

OS detection performed. Please report any incorrect results at http://nmap.org/submit/ .
Nmap done: 1 IP address (1 host up) scanned in 47.725 seconds
debian:/home/aghaster# nmap -O freebsd.anyshell.net

Starting Nmap 4.68 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2009-09-02 01:37 EDT
Interesting ports on 121.194.13.8:
Not shown: 1714 filtered ports
PORT   STATE SERVICE
22/tcp open  ssh
Warning: OSScan results may be unreliable because we could not find at least 1 open and 1 closed port
Device type: general purpose
Running (JUST GUESSING) : FreeBSD 7.X (87%)
Aggressive OS guesses: FreeBSD 7.0-BETA4 - 7.0-STABLE (87%), FreeBSD 7.0-PRERELEASE (87%), FreeBSD 7.0 (85%), FreeBSD 7.0-BETA2 (custom compiled) (85%), FreeBSD 7.0-CURRENT (85%), FreeBSD 7.0-CURRENT (pre-release) (85%)
No exact OS matches for host (test conditions non-ideal).
Uptime: 0.000 days (since Wed Sep  2 01:38:11 2009)

OS detection performed. Please report any incorrect results at http://nmap.org/submit/ .
Nmap done: 1 IP address (1 host up) scanned in 51.838 seconds
debian:/home/aghaster# nmap -O t1000.anyshell.net

Starting Nmap 4.68 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2009-09-02 01:38 EDT
Interesting ports on 121.194.13.10:
Not shown: 1714 filtered ports
PORT   STATE SERVICE
22/tcp open  ssh
Warning: OSScan results may be unreliable because we could not find at least 1 open and 1 closed port
Device type: general purpose
Running: Sun Solaris 9|10
OS details: Sun Solaris 9 or 10, Sun Solaris 9 or 10 (SPARC)
Uptime: 166.658 days (since Thu Mar 19 09:52:43 2009)

OS detection performed. Please report any incorrect results at http://nmap.org/submit/ .
Nmap done: 1 IP address (1 host up) scanned in 70.729 seconds
debian:/home/aghaster# nmap -O x4100.anyshell.net

Starting Nmap 4.68 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2009-09-02 01:39 EDT
Interesting ports on 121.194.13.11:
Not shown: 1714 filtered ports
PORT   STATE SERVICE
22/tcp open  ssh
Warning: OSScan results may be unreliable because we could not find at least 1 open and 1 closed port
Device type: general purpose
Running: Sun Solaris 9|10
OS details: Sun Solaris 9 or 10, Sun Solaris 9 or 10 (SPARC)
Uptime: 127.884 days (since Mon Apr 27 04:27:15 2009)

OS detection performed. Please report any incorrect results at http://nmap.org/submit/ .
Nmap done: 1 IP address (1 host up) scanned in 42.170 seconds
debian:/home/aghaster# nmap -O fedora.anyshell.net

Starting Nmap 4.68 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2009-09-02 01:41 EDT
Interesting ports on 121.194.13.12:
Not shown: 1710 filtered ports
PORT     STATE  SERVICE
22/tcp   open   ssh
5900/tcp open   vnc
5901/tcp closed vnc-1
5902/tcp closed vnc-2
5903/tcp closed vnc-3
Device type: general purpose|WAP|VoIP gateway|specialized|firewall|storage-misc|VoIP phone
Running (JUST GUESSING) : Linux 2.6.X|2.4.X (98%), FON Linux 2.6.X (92%), Linksys Linux 2.6.X|2.4.X (92%), Netgear Linux 2.6.X (92%), Tandberg Linux 2.6.X (92%), Infoblox NIOS 4.X (90%), Fortinet embedded (89%), Netgear embedded (89%)
Aggressive OS guesses: Linux 2.6.11 - 2.6.19 (98%), Linux 2.6.20 (94%), Linux 2.6.16 - 2.6.20 (94%), Linux 2.6.21 (93%), Linux 2.6.20 (Ubuntu, x86_64) (93%), Linux 2.6.22 (93%), Linux 2.6.22 (Ubuntu, x86) (93%), Wireless broadband router (FON La Fonera, Linksys WAP54GL, or Netgear WGT634U) (OpenWrt, Linux 2.6.22) (92%), Linux 2.6.9 - 2.6.23 (92%), Tandberg Border Controller VoIP gateway (Linux 2.6.11) (92%)
No exact OS matches for host (test conditions non-ideal).
Uptime: 0.356 days (since Tue Sep  1 17:09:46 2009)

OS detection performed. Please report any incorrect results at http://nmap.org/submit/ .
Nmap done: 1 IP address (1 host up) scanned in 48.487 seconds
debian:/home/aghaster# nmap -O ubuntu.anyshell.net

Starting Nmap 4.68 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2009-09-02 01:42 EDT
Interesting ports on 121.194.13.9:
Not shown: 1710 filtered ports
PORT     STATE  SERVICE
22/tcp   open   ssh
5900/tcp open   vnc
5901/tcp closed vnc-1
5902/tcp closed vnc-2
5903/tcp closed vnc-3
Device type: general purpose
Running: Linux 2.6.X
OS details: Linux 2.6.18 - 2.6.24
Uptime: 0.351 days (since Tue Sep  1 17:17:25 2009)

OS detection performed. Please report any incorrect results at http://nmap.org/submit/ .
Nmap done: 1 IP address (1 host up) scanned in 41.973 seconds
debian:/home/aghaster# nmap -O opensolaris.anyshell.net

Starting Nmap 4.68 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2009-09-02 01:43 EDT
Interesting ports on 121.194.13.6:
Not shown: 1710 filtered ports
PORT     STATE  SERVICE
22/tcp   open   ssh
5900/tcp closed vnc
5901/tcp closed vnc-1
5902/tcp closed vnc-2
5903/tcp closed vnc-3
Device type: general purpose
Running: Sun Solaris 9|10
OS details: Sun Solaris 9 or 10, Sun Solaris 9 or 10 (SPARC)
Uptime: 1.843 days (since Mon Aug 31 05:30:41 2009)

OS detection performed. Please report any incorrect results at http://nmap.org/submit/ .
Nmap done: 1 IP address (1 host up) scanned in 77.058 seconds

So now I know that they at least have the hardware.

#11 johnnymanson

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 07:47 AM


If I remember correctly VMS was a network operating system used by the Digital Equipment Corporation. I used this system back in the late 80s and early 90s. It was a great OS in it's time, but is pretty much obsolete now. The Alpha and VAX were different hardware systems that could run VMS. Google OpenVMS for more info. It's probably only of historical interest now.


Hum... If I look on Wikipedia and on HP's website OpenVMS doesn't look dead at all. I know someone that works for HP and I asked him and he said that HP-UX was the shit. I'd get a HP-UX account along with an AIX account, and maybe OpenVMS because it looks cool.


Aghaster, It appears that you are correct. I have just spent about an hour reading about current implementations of an OS that I thought was long dead. The HP link you provided really has a lot of information. I see that OpenVMS even supports Java now. I had assumed that the OS went away when we were forced to drop our VAX/VMS for an IBM AS-400 in the mid '90s. I'm glad to hear that it is still out there. In my opinion AS-400 never did measure up to the VAX/VMS system. I'm glad HP has kept it alive.

Free OpenVMS accounts are available at http://deathrow.vistech.net
I played with the demo account at this site and it looks pretty much the same as the old VAX/VMS system I used.

Thanks for the update, and please post to Binrev if you do anything interesting with OpenVMS.

#12 Aghaster

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 08:00 AM



If I remember correctly VMS was a network operating system used by the Digital Equipment Corporation. I used this system back in the late 80s and early 90s. It was a great OS in it's time, but is pretty much obsolete now. The Alpha and VAX were different hardware systems that could run VMS. Google OpenVMS for more info. It's probably only of historical interest now.


Hum... If I look on Wikipedia and on HP's website OpenVMS doesn't look dead at all. I know someone that works for HP and I asked him and he said that HP-UX was the shit. I'd get a HP-UX account along with an AIX account, and maybe OpenVMS because it looks cool.


Aghaster, It appears that you are correct. I have just spent about an hour reading about current implementations of an OS that I thought was long dead. The HP link you provided really has a lot of information. I see that OpenVMS even supports Java now. I had assumed that the OS went away when we were forced to drop our VAX/VMS for an IBM AS-400 in the mid '90s. I'm glad to hear that it is still out there. In my opinion AS-400 never did measure up to the VAX/VMS system. I'm glad HP has kept it alive.

Free OpenVMS accounts are available at http://deathrow.vistech.net
I played with the demo account at this site and it looks pretty much the same as the old VAX/VMS system I used.

Thanks for the update, and please post to Binrev if you do anything interesting with OpenVMS.


Yeah, I saw that website yesterday. Looks pretty cool. If I get a shell account at AnyShell.Net I'd be taking one for HP-UX at polarhome.com and then I'd get an account at deathrow for OpenVMS probably. Did you see their "wall of shame"? It's quite funny :p

#13 johnnymanson

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 10:27 AM

I did check out "The Wall of Shame."

The Hack Faq looks interesting too.

http://deathrow.vist...ms-hack-faq.txt

#14 Aghaster

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 11:05 AM

Enterprise-class environments typically select and use OpenVMS for various purposes including as a mail server, network services, manufacturing or transportation control and monitoring, critical applications and databases, and particularly environments where system uptime and data access is critical. System up-times of a decade or more have been reported, and features such as Rolling Upgrades and clustering allow clustered applications and data to remain continuously accessible while operating system software and hardware maintenance and upgrades are performed, or when a whole data center is destroyed. Customers using OpenVMS include banks and financial services, hospitals and healthcare, network information services, and large-scale industrial manufacturers of various products.


That is simply amazing :ohmy:

#15 AnyShell.Net

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Posted 13 September 2009 - 07:59 PM

Removed...

Edited by AnyShell.Net, 03 October 2009 - 07:21 PM.


#16 baby-Hackribs

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Posted 13 September 2009 - 11:42 PM

You guys do know that JFalcon and Beave are BinRev members, right?
I am sure you could direct questions about their system to them on the forums, heh, ask stank for a an OpenVMS/VAXen section.

You usually find them in Old School Phreak, not often though.

You could give 'em a ring at the Telephreak BBS, I do not know them personally, but we've talked and they seem like nice guys.

#17 jfalcon

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 01:03 PM

The Deathrow Cluster (OpenVMS) is actually Da Beave's project however has alot of support from the OpenVMS community. It does get support from it's userbase as well as some from Telephreak because some of us at Telephreak are also Old Computer Enthusiasts. ;) The cluster I'd say has the benefit of having a more laid back culture while still having access to some of the who's who of the VMS world like Hoffman (www.hoffmanlabs.org) who basically wrote the book on VMS twice over and Burley (among other VMS wizards). The cluster itself does have 32 bit VAX hardware (manson), 64 bit Alpha hardware (gein) and 64 bit Itanium (hardware there, just needs to be configured). There are also some little tricks about the cluster that you won't find anywhere else like Web based NOTES (DEC Notes is the equivalent of their groupware/bbs back in the day) along with the normal shell based offerings. And for anyone who's in the know... remember that the purest version of Pascal was on VMS. As in you can open a textbook from back in the day and transcribe the code in there and it would usually work because that's what the authors wrote the pascal code on.

But of course Beave can tell you much more about the Deathrow Cluster.

As for the OP's question: There are lots of places to test out different operating systems and hardware architectures. In fact, there's one place in germany that is a museum for supercomputers and every weekend they rotate through them so that people can try out their code on a Cray, Thinking Machine, Cyber, etc... Compaq/HP/DEC used to have a TestDrive setup on the net that was much the same way to showcase their hardware/OS offerings. And I think there are a couple groups offering public VM/370 access in Italy/Spain.

As for trying out different hardware architectures, I guess that depends on what platform you're interested in. Alot can be emulated through SIMH for some obscure ones. I find that alot of fun because you get to see both sides of the system. Not only the user perspective but the System Administrator view. Sparcstations can be had for a beer in just about any city with a used computer collection. I'd say the same with finding an old SGI Indigo/Indy/Octane. In terms of Operating Systems: I personally collect alot of operating systems. Mostly because I want to make sure I have a way of starting hardware which usually comes barebones/wiped. But also for reasons like what we're talking about here. Most of what they're offering is x86 based so if I want to fire up OpenSTEP/NextStep, I got the images. OS/2? Got them. QNX? Yup, I got that too if you're a serious machochist or embedded freak...

Now who has 3b1 + System 75? :)

#18 jfalcon

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 01:10 PM

Enterprise-class environments typically select and use OpenVMS for various purposes including as a mail server, network services, manufacturing or transportation control and monitoring, critical applications and databases, and particularly environments where system uptime and data access is critical. System up-times of a decade or more have been reported, and features such as Rolling Upgrades and clustering allow clustered applications and data to remain continuously accessible while operating system software and hardware maintenance and upgrades are performed, or when a whole data center is destroyed. Customers using OpenVMS include banks and financial services, hospitals and healthcare, network information services, and large-scale industrial manufacturers of various products.


That is simply amazing :ohmy:


And very true.

It's also one of the only operating systems where you can have a gangload of people using one machine and yet everyone can get their work done without grinding to a halt.... all inside 32MB of ram. Because VMS's very nature is Virtual Memory. Hence VMS stands for Virtual Memory System. No other operating system has been able to claim the solid robustness of VMS. Especially with limited resources. ;)




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