Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Serveral iso for one distro


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 Retro-Starr

Retro-Starr

    What number are we thinking of?

  • Members
  • 69 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 16 May 2009 - 03:06 PM

I'm confused about the many iso's for on distro.
ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/release...ISO-IMAGES/7.2/
This has three cd's and I don't know which one to download; I also see the boot-only iso which would be the live-cd only, barely any install?
The only thing I can think of for having three iso's is that it comes loaded with settings and software that the average user "may" need.
I've looked at the walk-through for installing and it didn't mention inserting 3 discs, same goes for debian.

Am I thinking of it correctly? I'm just confused about this...

#2 G-Brain

G-Brain

    mad 1337

  • Members
  • 127 posts
  • Country:
  • Gender:Male

Posted 16 May 2009 - 04:16 PM

To install you can either use 3 CD's:

7.2-RELEASE-i386-disc1.iso
7.2-RELEASE-i386-disc2.iso
7.2-RELEASE-i386-disc3.iso

Or the single DVD:

7.2-RELEASE-i386-dvd1.iso.gz

The bootonly is probably for network installs, recovery, etc.

#3 Retro-Starr

Retro-Starr

    What number are we thinking of?

  • Members
  • 69 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 16 May 2009 - 05:18 PM

So while installing it'll ask to put in another cd?
This would be similar to installing Diablo2, which pulled some of it's install material off the three discs that were included.
So disc one is boot info, disc two is network info and disc three is gui info (in no particular order and certainly not really what they are)?

#4 phasma

phasma

    Hakker addict

  • Members
  • 527 posts
  • Country:
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pennsylvania

Posted 16 May 2009 - 09:51 PM

So while installing it'll ask to put in another cd?
This would be similar to installing Diablo2, which pulled some of it's install material off the three discs that were included.
So disc one is boot info, disc two is network info and disc three is gui info (in no particular order and certainly not really what they are)?


Sorta. You'll burn one iso file to a blank cd and then you'll repeat that process until all you are finished. It wont ask you to enter in another CD you have to manually do that after its done burning. Unless your using a DVD which would only take once too burn. I'm not 100% sure what each of these 3 isos contain but they're important to have for installation.

#5 Retro-Starr

Retro-Starr

    What number are we thinking of?

  • Members
  • 69 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 17 May 2009 - 02:01 AM

Ok, I was just curious. I guess they are just big, no biggie (no pun).

I have a question, what's the difference between freeBSD and openBSD?
Besides openBSD has a cool tron-fish as a logo...=]

#6 AlexZ

AlexZ

    elite

  • Members
  • 114 posts
  • Country:
  • Gender:Male

Posted 17 May 2009 - 02:10 AM

I'll wrote some lines that I get from FreeBsd's official site...
FreeBSDĀ® is an advanced operating system for modern server, desktop, and embedded computer platforms. FreeBSD's code base has undergone over thirty years of continuous development, improvement, and optimization. It is developed and maintained by a large team of individuals. FreeBSD provides advanced networking, impressive security features, and world class performance and is used by some of the world's busiest web sites and most pervasive embedded networking and storage devices.

And here there is some lines about OpenBsd
The OpenBSD project produces a FREE, multi-platform 4.4BSD-based UNIX-like operating system. Our efforts emphasize portability, standardization, correctness, proactive security and integrated cryptography. OpenBSD supports binary emulation of most programs from SVR4 (Solaris), FreeBSD, Linux, BSD/OS, SunOS and HP-UX

How you can see, with a simple search on the web i'll get some information about them...
Cheers! ;)

#7 G-Brain

G-Brain

    mad 1337

  • Members
  • 127 posts
  • Country:
  • Gender:Male

Posted 17 May 2009 - 04:10 AM

OpenBSD is for the paranoid.

#8 Retro-Starr

Retro-Starr

    What number are we thinking of?

  • Members
  • 69 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 18 May 2009 - 02:24 AM

AlexZ your a smart ass...I've read both of those before I posted, but I want to know more then just that. Just like all flavors of linux use the same basic kernel, they have differences like the GUI and HOW things are done (without the command-line/terminal). They both sound almost similar with the portability which could "embedded".

#9 AlexZ

AlexZ

    elite

  • Members
  • 114 posts
  • Country:
  • Gender:Male

Posted 18 May 2009 - 08:01 AM

Take it easy guy...
I'll try to help you...I've never installed FreeBSD or OpenBSD so i don't know what are the differences between them...

#10 Retro-Starr

Retro-Starr

    What number are we thinking of?

  • Members
  • 69 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 18 May 2009 - 07:14 PM

I wasn't yelling or screaming, just merely stated what I was thinking.

#11 mirrorshades

mirrorshades

    aviatorglasses

  • Agents of the Revolution
  • 951 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 18 May 2009 - 09:08 PM

In a nutshell... FreeBSD's original intent was to provide a unix-like operating system that performed well on Intel x86-based hardware, while OpenBSD's goal has always been to provide a proactively-secure operating system out of the box. There's also NetBSD, which has aimed to become as cross-platform as possible (e.g. they have a version that runs on the Sega Dreamcast gaming console!).

FreeBSD: "The power to serve."

OpenBSD: "Free, Functional, Secure: Pick 3"

NetBSD: "Of course it runs NetBSD."


There are various other forks and offshoots, but those are the "Big Three" BSD versions in play. There used to be a fourth called BSD/OS or BSDi, that was a proprietary/commercial (non-free) version, but I don't believe that one is around anymore.

#12 Retro-Starr

Retro-Starr

    What number are we thinking of?

  • Members
  • 69 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 19 May 2009 - 10:53 PM

That's cool that NetBSD can run on the dreamcast! In your opinion which should I pick: FreeBSD or OpenBSD? I'd like to try something besides ubuntu or xubuntu (xubuntu wins). I just got used to and am still messing with fluxbox (can't get the sound icon...so frustrating). So I might take it with me if at all possible.

Possible answers to anything:
I'm a lacked user, I don't mind going to the terminal to do a few things just don't want to browse the whole HDD from within though. I haven't found something to do yet in linux like I did in windows like games and making the system crash (was learning from it and how to setup stuff). Any suggestions on what to do would be cool too.

#13 mirrorshades

mirrorshades

    aviatorglasses

  • Agents of the Revolution
  • 951 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 20 May 2009 - 02:32 PM

For a desktop, you could try PC-BSD: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pc-bsd

#14 Retro-Starr

Retro-Starr

    What number are we thinking of?

  • Members
  • 69 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 20 May 2009 - 06:20 PM

Very cool! I like the picture and the package management section seemed very cool. Also love the fact that version 1.4 is called the Da Vinci edition.

PC-BSD also contains a package management system which allows users to graphically install pre-built software packages from a single downloaded executable file, something uncommon on open source operating system.

If that's so, that would be cool to see on some other distros.

I was thinking last night that I could start to work on securing linux boxes. The field I'm looking into joining is IT security and computer repair/maintenance, anybody have any suggestion for this?


Some inside look at what the other cds might be for other distros...http://www.pcbsd.org/content/view/106/11/

Edited by Retro-Starr, 20 May 2009 - 06:21 PM.


#15 Dirk Chestnut

Dirk Chestnut

    SUP3R 31337 P1MP

  • Members
  • 268 posts
  • Location:248

Posted 20 May 2009 - 10:38 PM

Very cool! I like the picture and the package management section seemed very cool. Also love the fact that version 1.4 is called the Da Vinci edition.

PC-BSD also contains a package management system which allows users to graphically install pre-built software packages from a single downloaded executable file, something uncommon on open source operating system.

If that's so, that would be cool to see on some other distros.

I was thinking last night that I could start to work on securing linux boxes. The field I'm looking into joining is IT security and computer repair/maintenance, anybody have any suggestion for this?


Some inside look at what the other cds might be for other distros...http://www.pcbsd.org/content/view/106/11/


If you're looking into learning how to secure Linux boxes, you should use and learn a Linux distribution, as opposed to a flavor of BSD.

Many of the concepts are the same, but there are differences. For example, for firewalling, Linux uses IPTables, while the BSDs use IPFilter. I don't have much experience with IPFilter, but I'd assume it works differently in defining filtering rules.

If you're looking into doing this professionally, the main distributions of Linux you'll be interested in are Debian (or Ubuntu) and Redhat (or CentOS or Fedora). If you have zero Linux experience, I typically prescribe Ubuntu, as it's almost always going to be the most successful mix of easy-to-install, and compatible with all of your hardware right out of the box.

At the end of the day, you'll want to learn how to secure things via command-line (aka shell). The shell is where differences between most flavors of Linux become unnoticeable - most distributions work the same under the hood, but are differentiated by different default user interfaces and base application installations. When you're comfortable with the shell, you'll find you can manage to do almost anything you know on one distro on another.

#16 Bizurke

Bizurke

    Thought Criminal

  • Members
  • 1,018 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NoDak

Posted 11 July 2009 - 07:39 AM

If you are looking to play with BSD and want a comfortable environment then why don't you get Debian GNU/KfreeBSD a try. It's basically the GNU over FreeBSD and it includes debian packages and the debian package management system (dpkg/apt) which I think would help in easing into using unix for the first time. I've never tried it myself but that's just because I'm not really that interested in BSD. I do have friends who have used it and had good reviews.

In general for Debian installs there are multiple discs. You really only need to install the first disc which is the base system and then you can do the rest online if you wish. I always just use a single ISO and add anything else I think I need later.

Check it out at http://www.debian.or...s/kfreebsd-gnu/

Edited by Bizurke, 11 July 2009 - 07:41 AM.





BinRev is hosted by the great people at Lunarpages!