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#1121 JmanA9

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 08:53 PM

Also, Qwest has a new AIS - 801-255-0017

WOW, that's the first time I've heard receiver-off-hook tone through a cell phone. I never want to hear it that way again. I have a feeling that a reorder should be there instead, and somebody messed up.

#1122 nyphonejacks

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 09:13 PM

Also, Qwest has a new AIS - 801-255-0017

Here's some interesting messages from the old one;
218-935-9992
218-935-9993


i get SIT "the number 801-255-0017 is IN service please try your call again"
shouldn't it say NOT IN service?

SIT "due to system failure 935-9992 is not in service please try your call again later"

SIT "the number 935-9993 is IN service please try your call again"

#1123 resistor X

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 08:24 PM

What I'm about to post here pertains to results I got with Qwest POTS line, however if it's true with Qwest similar is probably true in some other places.

I called a few star codes which are NOT in service here according to Qwest, yet dialing them was successful and I got the 2nd dial tone.



Tests results achieved after calling *30 1st :

(did this on 02/14/11 12:33:09am MST)

1. then dialed 2 regular phone #'s to substantiate you can dial locally, successful.

2. then called 800-444-4444 ANAC to substantiate I can dial 800 #'s, I can. It also read my number correctly.



Then I tried to dial this one a whim, it worked :

*2#


Personal note which I literally wrote down after I dialed *2# successfully : It worked? Dialing a # at the end should've invalidated the attempt. WTF?



As a result of finding *2# worked, I did this :

I dialed *2, & just waited. After 15 seconds, it worked too.


But it's only the * and a 1 digit number and excluded the # after it, yet it also worked. Interesting.


NOTE that the VSC's listed on nanpa (recent, as of 2-12-2011) shows no codes less than 2 numbers in length, see that list here :

http://www.nanpa.com...ssignments.html


Also noteworthy, the above nanpa VSC list shows no codes whose format is *X# either, yet I dailed it successfully!

This got more interesting.... I then placed local and long distance calls, even toll free ones after dialing both star codes *2 and *2#. Mind you, I dialed several phone numbers after dialing both *2 and *2# and the calls completed. See recording #20. Calls should not complete with a non-numeric digit in the dialing sequence much less missing a numerical digit making it just *2.


Then I went further and test dialed these :

*2##

*2###


They worked. But I cross-tested to see if an actual star code 'in use' allows this, so I dialed *98 to access the Qwest voicemail box. It worked though I dialed these instead of the required *98 :

*988

*9888


Wild shit.

Ok... question now is : Is that extra numerical digit - the 8 that came after *98 above - though invalid, not being counted and gets dropped off or............. ?



Well, the above question I had just posed to myself got me thinking this question : What will happen if I dial something besides *988 and instead dial this :

*980


It worked too! Everything's working so far. Fascinating. So I then scanned all sequences, *980 thru *989, they all worked. But the above question comes to mind again, which is : Is it dropping off the last digit, or....?... that's a good question.



This time I tried another active star code - *67. Unlike the above which all succeeded, this test has 'exceptions', which are :

*670 "Welcome to Qwest. For service in English, press 1. To place a call..." op-asstd calling.

*679 hangs up

*678 hangs up

*677 reorder

*676 hangs up

*675 hangs up

*674 hangs up

*673 hangs up

*672 hangs up

*671 hangs up


These sporadically worked at that.

So, results show *2# works every time, *2 works every time, but *670 thru *679 type dialing only works sporadically as with *67.

Interesting.



As I started out saying, this is on Qwest POTS line in Denver CO. Qwest's site listing all calling features, including those using star codes, doesn't include these as working star codes - see this Qwest list which can be found here for reference (which I retrieved yesterday) :

http://www.qwest.com...ngfeatures.html



More test results :

Dialing only *3, waiting for 15 seconds, works as well. I can complete calls after dialing this.

Dialing *3# works also and can complete calls after dialing it.


Note : When dialing *3 and *3#, the star code 'completes' slightly differently. Rather than simply getting the 2nd dial tone, it first gives a very short reorder and then the 2nd dial tone.


Because of the interesting test results I got above, I had some questions to pose to nanpa. Here's the emailing on that one :

from JW <j.w**************>

to NANPA Feedback <Nanpa.Feedback@neustar.biz>

date Mon, Feb 14, 2011 at 9:04 AM

subject Re: FW: Feedback from NANPA website


I see why it wasn't clear to me. The confusion stems from how it's shown on the nanpa site, that being :

*2x

*3x

Since it's reserved for 3 digits - 3 after the * - it should've been typed in as :

*2xx

*3xx

So, whoever typed it in for the web page, typed it in wrong since it should have been typed is as *2xx and *3xx, not *2x and *3x.


-JW


----------------------
On Mon, Feb 14, 2011 at 8:51 AM,
NANPA Feedback<

Nanpa.Feedback@neustar.biz
> wrote:

JW,


VSCs listed are mostly 2-digits (after the *) Examples: *61, *58, *83. The 2x and 3x are held for 3-digit (after the *) VSCs. Example *23 is NOT valid, *231 is valid.




Thomas C. Foley

Neustar, Inc. / Senior Manager Data Analysis - NANPA


--------------------
From: JW [j.w*********************]
Sent: Monday, February 14, 2011 10:47 AM
To: NANPA Feedback
Subject: Re: Feedback from NANPA website


Thank you for your reply.


I have a follow up question pertaining to the first paragraph of your reply :

What do you mean "...rather than 2 digits."?


-JW


----- Original Message -----

From: "NANPA Feedback" <Nanpa.Feedback@neustar.biz>
To: <j.w***************>
Sent: Monday, February 14, 2011 6:06 AM
Subject: FW: Feedback from NANPA website


JW,


The "x" refers to any digit 0-9. In other words, any VSC beginning with a 2
or a 3 will have 3, rather than 2, digits.

The VSCs listed are Industry wide. Local carriers may chose to use one or
more for other purposes within their networks. The do run the risk of
having the Industry specify it for another purpose.


Not all VSCs return a second dial tone.



Thomas C. Foley

Neustar, Inc. / Senior Manager Data Analysis - NANPA


-----Original Message-----

From: JW [j.w******************]

Sent: Monday, February 14, 2011 3:51 AM

To: NANPA Feedback

Subject: Feedback from NANPA website

**********************************************************************

* This message was sent from the NANPA web site - http://www.nanpa.com

**********************************************************************

Full Name ...........: JW
Company .............:
Address .............:
City ................:
State ...............:
Zip .................:
Email ...............: j.w*************
Phone ...............:
Respond via .........: Please respond via email
Comments.............:

I have a few questions regarding VSC's listed here on

your site:

http:www.nanpa.comnumber_resource_infovsc_assignments.html


Question #1 -

I want to know what the 'x' by each represents, meaning it is reserved for a
number and/or another digit regarding these 2 codes listed :


2X - Reserved for expansion to 3digit VSCs

3X - Reserved for expansion to 3-digit VSCs


Question #2 -

Regarding the above 2 reserved codes, does their being listed as
'reserved' mean no one is currently using them.


Question #3 -

Again, regarding the VSC's above :

Are these codes currently 'enabled' though still reserved
for future use Meaning, can they be successfully dialed and the second dial
tone is heard which verifies it's successful completion If yes, what is the
reason for this.



Thank you ahead of time for a prompt reply,

J.W.

**********************************************************************

* Web Browser .......: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 6.0; en-US;

rv:1.9.2.10) Gecko/20100914 Firefox/3.6.10 (.NET CLR 3.5.30729)

* Remote Address ....: xx.xxx.xxx.xxx -

* Web Server ........: Apache

**********************************************************************


Now, question #1 to them was me trying to confirm that the x in their list wouldn't include a # as a digit - they meant only 0-9. As you can read, they confirmed this so it means Qwest or whomever has enabled # as a digit instead of a number. That's what I figured.

Reason for asking question #2 speaks for itself. Same for the last one.

Basically why I contacted them was to confirm what I already concluded, which is these other star codes are being used 'internally' as opposed to being assigned to 'other parties' who also don't want the public using them.


However, their email does not explain why I can dial 'extra digits' after an in-use star code and still have it work (see above when dialing *980 through *989).




Edited by resistor X, 14 February 2011 - 08:41 PM.


#1124 nyphonejacks

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 09:34 PM

i just did a quick vertical service code scan on my home phone service provider - optimum voice.. which is provided by my cable provider.. CBCAD = your call can't be completed as dialed...

*00 - CBCAD

*01 - CBCAD

*02 - CBCAD

*03 - CBCAD

*04 - CBCAD

*05 - CBCAD

*06 - CBCAD

*07 - CBCAD

*08 - CBCAD

*09 - CBCAD

*2X - Reserved for expansion to 3digit VSCs

*228 - CBCAD

*272 - CBCAD
*3X - Reserved for expansion to 3-digit VSCs

*40 - CBCAD

*41 - CBCAD

*42 - CBCAD

*43 - CBCAD

*44 - CBCAD

*45 - CBCAD

*46 - CBCAD

*47 - CBCAD

*48 - CBCAD

*49 - CBCAD

*50 - CBCAD

*51 - CBCAD

*52 - CBCAD

*53 - CBCAD

*54 - CBCAD

*55 - CBCAD

*56 - CBCAD

*57 - WORKS... hopefully I hung up before it had a chance to charge me, or put a trace on my own cell phone...

*58 - CBCAD

*59 - CBCAD

*60 - "Were sorry but the service you are trying to use is not available on this line"

*61 - "Were sorry but the service you are trying to use is not available on this line"

*62 - "Were sorry but the service you are trying to use is not available on this line"

*63 - "Were sorry but the service you are trying to use is not available on this line"

*64 - CBCAD

*65 - "Were sorry but the service you are trying to use is not available on this line"

*66 - "were sorry your automatic call back request can not be processed at this time..."

*67 - WORKS...

*68 - gets dial tone after stutter tone, but does not forward on busy???

*69 - WORKS

*70 - WORKS

*71 - CBCAD

*72 - WORKS

*73 - WORKS

*74 - "Were sorry but the service you are trying to use is not available on this line"

*75 - "Were sorry but the service you are trying to use is not available on this line"

*76 - CBCAD

*77 - WORKS

*78 - CBCAD

*79 - CBCAD

*80 - "Were sorry but the service you are trying to use is not available on this line"

*81 - "Were sorry but the service you are trying to use is not available on this line"

*82 - WORKS

*83 - "Were sorry but the service you are trying to use is not available on this line"

*84 - CBCAD

*85 - "Were sorry but the service you are trying to use is not available on this line"

*86 - reorder

*87 - WORKS

*88 - CBCAD

*89 - "all outstanding automatic recall requests have been deactivated"

*90 - "Were sorry but the service you are trying to use is not available on this line"

*91 - "Were sorry but the service you are trying to use is not available on this line"

*92 - "Were sorry but the service you are trying to use is not available on this line"

*93 - "Were sorry but the service you are trying to use is not available on this line"

*94 - CBCAD

*95 - CBCAD

*96 - CBCAD

*97 - CBCAD

*98 - CBCAD

*99 - ANAC

#1125 resistor X

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Posted 15 February 2011 - 08:33 PM

P.S.

Addition to my prior post above :

Using my Verizon cell, here's the results :

*2# Your feature update could not be completed. To speak to a customer service representative, please hang up and dial *611. Announcement 12 Switch 5 8 dash 1.

*3# " " (same as above)

Since it's not working on vzw, this is obviously some Qwest enabled internal-use thing they've set up. The thing to do now is for me to discover what it does.

Btw, in my prior post, when mentioning I had dialed *2# and so on, it meant the # sign was literally dialed at that point. Just making that clear.

Edit : I tried to add this edit to my post above after I submitted the post, but I believe my modem settings were causing me to have network issues and because of it my editing attempts were failing so I just decided to add it this way. Excuse it please. heh.

#1126 ThoughtPhreaker

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 10:12 PM

Personal note which I literally wrote down after I dialed *2# successfully : It worked? Dialing a # at the end should've invalidated the attempt. WTF?


At least in my experience, dialing # just tells the switch "okay, I'm finished dialing"

NIce, though. Any idea what these do? From my switch (Qwest 5ESS), *1, *2, and *3 all go to reorder before I can give it the next digit. *4 waits for something else, but nothing I can think to try works; ABCD tones, dialpulse, *, #, 1-0. Waiting will give you a YCDNGT, though.

However, their email does not explain why I can dial 'extra digits' after an in-use star code and still have it work (see above when dialing *980 through *989).


I think that's just the switch's way of dealing with extra digits. Like for example, if you dial 1-800-YELLOWPAGES, it knows those last four digits shouldn't be there, so it ignores them and puts the call through.

Note : When dialing *3 and *3#, the star code 'completes' slightly differently. Rather than simply getting the 2nd dial tone, it first gives a very short reorder and then the 2nd dial tone.


You aren't on a DMS-100 by any chance, are you? That might explain why *67 is behaving so funny too. Back when I got service from a DMS, I remember having to dial *67# when I was scanning if I wanted to move a little faster. Over here, the 5ESS just immediately gives you dialtone back. And starts acting a little strangely too. A lot of dialing errors go straight to reorder, if you made the first digit of 1167 dialpulse instead of DTMF (but not the second), it won't break dialtone when you press * or #, but if you break dialtone again using dialpulse, it'll take a lot longer to break. If you're familiar with the Evan Doorbell tapes, think about how Crossbar 1 had a burst of dialtone after the first digit.

Switches are weird. Posted Image

#1127 resistor X

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Posted 18 February 2011 - 01:35 PM

ThoughtPhreaker –


At least in my experience, dialing # just tells the switch "okay, I'm finished dialing"

The reason the question crossed my mind is when I dial a working start code, say *98, it doesn't need the # at the end yet it knows you're finished dialing. Being this is the case, I'm thinking it must the switch acting weird because I can dial the *2 without the # at the end and have it complete anyway!



NIce, though. Any idea what these do? From my switch (Qwest 5ESS), *1, *2, and *3 all go to reorder before I can give it the next digit. *4 waits for something else, but nothing I can think to try works; ABCD tones, dialpulse, *, #, 1-0. Waiting will give you a YCDNGT, though.

I have no idea what these do... yet. I'm still testing trying to see if I can discover what they do. No results yet though, which sucks. I'm dying of curiosity to find out. :p

ABCD tones? I don't have a box, just the regular phone. I'll need to consider it since this limits me - what if any of them can only work via a box? Damn, now you got me thinking since using a phone doesn't allow me to input other tones.



I think that's just the switch's way of dealing with extra digits. Like for example, if you dial 1-800-YELLOWPAGES, it knows those last four digits shouldn't be there, so it ignores them and puts the call through.

Yea, I agree... most likely this is the case, however I was daydreaming/hoping it may 'for another reason' so I was testing to see if it may turn out to be the case.



You aren't on a DMS-100 by any chance, are you? That might explain why *67 is behaving so funny too. Back when I got service from a DMS, I remember having to dial *67# when I was scanning if I wanted to move a little faster. Over here, the 5ESS just immediately gives you dialtone back. And starts acting a little strangely too. A lot of dialing errors go straight to reorder, if you made the first digit of 1167 dialpulse instead of DTMF (but not the second), it won't break dialtone when you press * or #, but if you break dialtone again using dialpulse, it'll take a lot longer to break. If you're familiar with the Evan Doorbell tapes, think about how Crossbar 1 had a burst of dialtone after the first digit.

Switches are weird. :blink:

Very good. You get a star, heh. I'm a DMS-100 alright.

I couldn't agree more. Switches are weird.

#1128 resistor X

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Posted 18 February 2011 - 04:03 PM

Just discovered this, FWIW :

When a Qwest billing rep calls the ANAC 570-674-0086, they hear back this number :

212-0000

#1129 ThoughtPhreaker

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 01:49 PM

ABCD tones? I don't have a box, just the regular phone. I'll need to consider it since this limits me - what if any of them can only work via a box? Damn, now you got me thinking since using a phone doesn't allow me to input other tones.




If you have a modem, they'll generate the tones quite nicely. Beware that sometimes they only like it in a certain case, though.


When a Qwest billing rep calls the ANAC 570-674-0086, they hear back this number :
212-0000




huh, the last few times I got a rep to call an ANAC, they got some 866 number.

#1130 Asterisk Phreak

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 09:54 PM

I'm getting an interesting response by dialing the following number from different types of phone line
757-485-9999
From AT&T cellular, it tells me that "you are not allowed to call this type of number" (but I can call other numbers in the same exchange with no problems).
From a SIP provider, I get a long delay followed by a reorder.
From a landline I get an immediate reorder (sounds local, but not sure).

Any ideas what this is?

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#1131 ThoughtPhreaker

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 10:04 PM

It's probably just there to test the SS7 capability of the switch. I get a CBCAD recording from my local office.

You might be interested in this; 843-661-0000

#1132 nyphonejacks

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 10:42 PM

It's probably just there to test the SS7 capability of the switch. I get a CBCAD recording from my local office.

You might be interested in this; 843-661-0000


interesting... does that loop forever or is there an end to it?

#1133 ThoughtPhreaker

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 02:11 AM

It depends on how your carrier treats the condition. VoIP carriers are generally known for handing the call off to a hundred people each with about a hundred different interconnect agreements.

It'd be interesting to find an ANAC in a really high USF ratecenter that does this >.>

EDIT: hmm, it accepts collect calls. That's always an easy way to call things through random carriers. 867-980-1001 is about the most interesting way I can think to route the call. I mean, if one of the northernmost telephone exchanges in the world is your kinda thing.

Edited by ThoughtPhreaker, 10 March 2011 - 02:25 AM.


#1134 Asterisk Phreak

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 08:39 PM

It depends on how your carrier treats the condition. VoIP carriers are generally known for handing the call off to a hundred people each with about a hundred different interconnect agreements.

It'd be interesting to find an ANAC in a really high USF ratecenter that does this >.>

EDIT: hmm, it accepts collect calls. That's always an easy way to call things through random carriers. 867-980-1001 is about the most interesting way I can think to route the call. I mean, if one of the northernmost telephone exchanges in the world is your kinda thing.


Interesting. I take it the condition is that the call cannot be completed though a particular carrier? AT&T cellular makes two attempts and cuts me off. CallWithUs and Verizon landline each make several dozen attempts. Verizon eventually ends with the "all circuits are busy now" recording. I notice the voice is somewhat muffled on most of the attempts, but a few of them sound particularly clear. I guess there is really that much difference in the quality between carriers?

#1135 ThoughtPhreaker

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 01:08 AM

Interesting. I take it the condition is that the call cannot be completed though a particular carrier?


There's cases where that might happen, but I think here it's just a matter of how many routes it has to try. Like, AT&T doesn't buy minutes from any other carriers, so the originating long distance tandem, probably aware that the circuit busy message has nothing to do with what route is being taken through the AT&T network, will send it to the legacy Bellsouth network instead before having no choice but to give up.

A lot of newer networks operate on a model of buying minutes on other carriers' networks instead of owning every inch of fiber your call goes through. So failing one route, it will send it to another - and then failing that, the carrier they send the call to will send it to yet another carrier and so on and so on until someone (or something) gets impatient and hangs up the call.

I guess there is really that much difference in the quality between carriers?




Yup. Especially these days, when you're dealing with two completely different business models, a ton of different technologies, and the motivation to constantly have another channel to sell minutes on.

#1136 JmanA9

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 10:21 AM

If you want to see how your carrier handles reroutes, try calling the old Pittsburgh weather number, 412-936-1212. You'll get a recording that says "This service is no longer available" from what I believe is known as the "Downtown 71T" tandem. Sprint LD from my house retries the number at least 10 times, picking lower-quality routes as it goes.

#1137 ThoughtPhreaker

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 09:38 PM

huh, at least with 101-0333 here, it's a little less than ten, and has no lower quality routes.

#1138 Asterisk Phreak

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 10:03 PM

huh, at least with 101-0333 here, it's a little less than ten, and has no lower quality routes.


So can someone outline the steps that are actually taking place here? My guess is something like this:
1. Local carrier tries to connect to remote number, through other long-distance carrier.
2. Remote signals, through SS7, that the call cannot be routed this way. But it passes audio meanwhile anyway?
3. Local carrier tries next LD carrier since that one did not work.
4. Once all carriers have been tried, local exchange gives up and plays a recording such as "all circuits busy".

I have a DID number to my Asterisk PBX. Is there any way it could cause it to send a similar signal? My guess is no, since my protocol is SIP and it does not change to SS7 until it leaves the DID provider?

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#1139 ThoughtPhreaker

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Posted 12 March 2011 - 04:58 AM

So can someone outline the steps that are actually taking place here? My guess is something like this:
1. Local carrier tries to connect to remote number, through other long-distance carrier.
2. Remote signals, through SS7, that the call cannot be routed this way. But it passes audio meanwhile anyway?
3. Local carrier tries next LD carrier since that one did not work.
4. Once all carriers have been tried, local exchange gives up and plays a recording such as "all circuits busy".



Since my long distance tandem happens to be a little more vocal about what's going on, this might be the best way to illustrate what's going on; http://thoughtphreak..._bellsouth.flac

Once I finish dialing (the recording starts immediately after this), my 5ESS sends the call to the Qwest long distance tandem. Once it's performed call setup, it stays uninvolved for the majority of the call; all the 5ESS knows at this point is that the call hasn't suped yet.

The first two routes are pretty straightforward - the long distance tandem sets the call up with the distant end equipment, and it reaches the terminating office. Once we're connected, it's standard practice to just relay the audio until further instructed. In this case, a cause code is sent back to my long distance tandem giving it some variety of all circuits busy condition. You can hear my long distance tandem acting upon this by making a popping noise every time it picks a different route.

After these first few routes, the long distance tandem is put into a position similar to my 5ESS; it passes the call to another piece of equipment, and is expected to keep relaying audio for the interim. You'll hear it - or something else in the connection - act upon the same cause code by just making a soft burst of static. Finally, once it's out of routes to try, it'll pass the cause code onto my long distance tandem, which quickly runs out of routes to try itself. Once it's through, it passes the cause code back to my office, which has no choice but to give me a recording.

All carriers act upon situations like this differently - if it's a big carrier like MCI, they can try a different route through their own network, or even just try the same route twice. If you tried making a collect call to this through AT&T, the OSPS (this actually depends on which one you home off of; not all OSPSes do this) lets you know when it's re-attempting the call. If you're using the Sprint network, their tandem will play the all circuits busy message itself, and then send an unrelated cause code back to your office which usually just prompts the switch to dump you to reorder.

As for generating these codes for SIP, it's all relative to how the media gateway wants to interperate it. If you take a look at what SIP and ISDN cause codes look like, they're both very different;
http://networking.ri...ncausecodes.php
http://en.wikipedia...._response_codes

You can send whatever SIP response you like back to the media gateway, but what it sends back via SS7 depends on what the software feels accurately describes your condition.
Also, just be sure that Asterisk isn't making the call supervise; there's times that even when you never explicitly tell it to, Asterisk feels it understands your best interests better than you do, so it'll force the call to answer without telling you. On a 5ESS, you can verify whether or not a call has answered by trying to flash. The short answer is if it gives you studder dialtone, the call has answered. If not, it'll ignore you. In my (admittedly limited, I'm actually going to try this once I finish this post) experience with this happening, this won't effect a switch's behavior too much, but this could also easily anger something that's connecting your call. Fear the switches, for they are vengeful.

Edited by ThoughtPhreaker, 12 March 2011 - 05:07 AM.


#1140 dmine45

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Posted 12 March 2011 - 07:58 AM

If you want to see how your carrier handles reroutes, try calling the old Pittsburgh weather number, 412-936-1212. You'll get a recording that says "This service is no longer available" from what I believe is known as the "Downtown 71T" tandem. Sprint LD from my house retries the number at least 10 times, picking lower-quality routes as it goes.


I have Verizon LD for my LD carrier. It piggy backs off each of the Verizon tandems to get to its destination.

After the recording plays, it "drops back" to the Verizon LD tandem in Pittsburgh with an All Circuits Are Busy recording, identifying itself as tandem PI-002.

On MCI (101-0222) it just goes to reorder after the recording plays.

On Sprint (101-0333), it retries and replays the recording multiple times and never seems to quit! :)

On Qwest (101-0432) it also retries. But you hear a click each time it retries. It stops afer about 10 tries.

On Excel/Vartec (10-0297) it also retries and doesn't quit.

On AT&T (10-0288) it plays once and then quits, dropping back to my CO.

On AT&T OSPS it plays once and "drops back" to OSPS and plays an All Circuits Busy recording (in this case from the origination OSPS 804-0T)




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