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hacker ethic and game development


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#1 holy_handgrenade

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Posted 17 December 2002 - 03:38 AM

I just got the newest issue of Game Developer magazine today. It was awesome, the first issue in over a year where everything in the magazine was pertinent to what I'm interested in. Graphics, Programming, Design, and tools.

I read the whole thing cover to cover and came away utterly disgusted. The reason for this was because every article in the magazine has the underlying theme of "Small teams are a thing of the past, big teams and big budgets are the only way to go in the modern era". And this completely frustrates me to no end.

Now why did this community minded, small team industry grow into the big business corporate bs that even the magazines are pushing the same thing into everyones heads. So much so that it seems that reading this magazine that they're forcing the concept down your throat untill you walk away beliving you cant get anywhere.

Is this happening everywhere? I've noticed the trend in web developing as well. And is this pissing anyone else off?

Why did I name this topic about the hacker ethic? Game developers used to live the hacker ethic - the one talked about on RFA and here on the forums - almost an entire industry of people who "get it". Information sharing, team work, helping even competitors out to get the jobs done. This was what attracted me to this industry to begin with. Why does it seem to be slipping away?

#2 GUEST_Guest_***

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Posted 17 December 2002 - 09:07 AM

Video games are BIG business ($7.3 billion from TheStreet.com). With large money comes more power concentrated in larger corporations, smaller companies can't compete, creativity is stifled...Am I wrong?

#3 dual

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Posted 17 December 2002 - 09:08 AM

my post above

#4 StankDawg

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Posted 17 December 2002 - 10:00 AM

HHG, I got my issue last night as well, but Ihaven't had tome to read it yet.

AS far as the reason, well right or wrong, it comes down to timeliness and responsibility. Small teams take forever working on a project (can anyone say Duke Nukem?) and watch deadlines WHOOSH right past a la iD software (it will be done when it is done).

For me, if the game is good, I don't care how long it takes. But the biggest problem with the industry a few years ago was VAPORWARE which had ads in magazines and big buzz about upcoming games that came out YEARS late or never came out at all! :mumble:

OTOH, the biggest problem now (IMHO) is that these big companies release game on time, but they constantly CRASH and cause problems that make the damn game unplayable anyway!!! Sometimes I wish they did take a little longer and do it right instead of releasing patches every week to fix their fukked up product. :borg:

It is catch-22.

#5 twirlz

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Posted 17 December 2002 - 10:14 AM

but that goes for every single bit of software out there *cough*windows*cough* they just want to roll out what they have in hopes and we the ppl that buy the crap will be the beta testers for their software in hopes that they don't have to spend the money on patches to fix the software or security updates to keep your info safe. but when will this change? there are virus writers that use the exploit in Outlook Express in the Preview Pane to activate their vbs script. now i don't know if that has been fixed yet, but for the longest time they let that go.

#6 Zapperlink

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Posted 17 December 2002 - 10:19 AM

I feel it mostly comes down to money. The reason they dont share is because they dont want to waste the time helping someone and not getting money out of it. Another problem in todays society is the quality. Now some products are acutally of fair quality but most of the time the gameplay has been shot for some overdone rushed theme. Or even the graphics have been saraficed to put the product out before the competitor. I am proud of those companies that actually will release a product past due date to take the time to make sure things are perfect.

#7 holy_handgrenade

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Posted 18 December 2002 - 02:26 AM

Well the main reason I was bitching (sorry for ranting) was because they tend to drive home the idea that there's no hope for a small, independant game designer to come out with a good game and be able to survive in todays market.


Now, with tools coming out that are really inexpensive comparitively to 5 years ago, I dont see why garage games are almost discouraged. *Most* projects in the industry start out and get to beta before a budget is set or publishers are involved. Publishers dont like "ideas" or "concepts", they want a product. Now, that changes if a publisher wants a title and goes looking for developers, but usually it's the other way around.

I'm pushing through with my game. As of yet I still dont have a single line of code done on it, but the story, concept art, theme and program flow have all been designed.

Now, to be honest, I'm not doing the game for the money. I've attempted to pitch the idea of the game to a few publishers and they literally laughed at me. They said that due to all thier wisdom and product testing that the game I'm making doesn't have a market. Well, so what, fuck 'em. The problem that I am having is for a formerly community minded group such as game developers, and particularly GD Magazine to go so anti-indie. Every article seems to start out by saying "A small team or garage team is never going to be able to make a quality game, but if you have the budget and team here's what you do". It pisses me off that theres a disclaimer on info now.

Hehe, I will grant you though, small teams do take forever - I've only been really working on this for about 3 years - I got the concept and story started about 5 years ago. *IF* things go right, I'm hoping to have the game ready in about 2 years (2005 release). So that's about 5 years real work, and 7 years total time spent on this - and I'm only one geeky white guy :)

#8 StankDawg

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Posted 18 December 2002 - 10:36 AM

we will beta test 4 u! ;)




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