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Gas Gang Uses 'Never-Before-Seen' Device To Hack, Steal From P


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#21 Lord Wud

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 10:03 PM

If anyone with one of these machines reads this forum I say that you should start stealing the gas, then filling up random peoples tanks. We could use a modern day Robin Hood

#22 alienbinary

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 09:50 AM

why not just siphon gas from other cars?


If I was desperate/crazy enough to steal gas, I'd much rather steal it from Shell (who announced $27.6bn profit for 2007) or other gas company, than from people's cars off the street. Usually, the older the car the easier it is to steal gas. So some poor guy who's filled his aging car with $60 of gas can hardly afford to fuel another's habit too.

Come the end of the month, if someone siphoned my car I'd be screwed - no work, no shopping, nothing. Stop stealing my gas Tao! ;)


This is a common problem in ethics when it comes to any aspect of hacking.

In many ways, or at least in some demented way in my head, this makes a great parallel to some of the issues faced by people who like to get out from the computer lab and into the city for some exploration. I have definitely had a girlfriend or two hook her arm underneath mine with force because I was veering in the direction of an unlocked kiosk that some employee had neglected to re-secure. Although all I wanted to do in these situations was poke around and maybe take some pictures with my camphone, the ethical dillemma didn't occur to me until later: if I was seen on camera exploiting even the most benign of security holes, that employee could lose their job. Were they to expect that they had someone with a superior understanding of their systems hanging around in their stores looking for an opportunity to gain access? Not really. These people are underpaid and unfortunately, if I might make a sweeping broad generalization, undereducated. They're not being so much lazy as they just lack the foresight to see the implications. I, on the other hand, can see from over a decade of self education from internet newsgroups, zines and community just how much of an opportunity this is for a hacker. But perhaps, just perhaps, the implications of exploiting the physical security vulnerabilities in regards to the person whose simple mistake it might have been may elude me.

It is that nagging girlfriend or overcautious best friend (also known as noob) who can sometimes save us from our overzealous selves.

Man, I missed this place. Intelligent discourse isn't exactly... rampant on the internet these days.

#23 carwash

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 10:33 AM

One bad thing that I use to do was to steal the gas pump stickers while I was filling up.

I still have a whole collection of them stored away in a book

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Play stupid games/win stupid prizes hahah Happy Friday

#24 Andre van dem Helge

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Posted 21 June 2008 - 04:36 AM

That reminds me of a gas station. For some reason some states premium gas is 91 octane (I think these are the states that follow CARB standards) and other states 93 octane.... yet for some reason there;s a place here that has 92 octane... isn't that weird.

Anyways if you want to steal gas and not get caught why don't you just clone credit cards? They aren't going to know for ~1 month until the person disputes the charges and all the paperwork gets sorted out. Not saying you should steal gas in any form.... but it would be interesting to know how those "devices" work and how the gas pumps work too..... Maybe they just used to work at a gas station that had the same brand of pumps and they are just using some sort of "test key?" Anyone ever seen the inside of a gas pump? How do they work? I was at the station I mentioned above a week or so ago and all the screens on the pumps were either blank or frozen (text normally scrolls on them) yet they were able to control the pumps from the register. I remember I prepaid $40 since I only needed 1/2 tank and it even shut off at $40 so I wonder if the credit card reader/pin pad and the rest of the pump are separate units? Imagine if it was as easy as jumping a relay in the pump? How about the gas stations with "anceint" pumps (or "very modern" ones... alot of Shell stations seem to have those)

And about stealing gas.... you know that generally Exxon and Shell, etc don't own gas stations. Gas station pays the oilco for the gasoline that gets delivered. If you steal from the gas station you aren't stealing from Texaco, etc you are stealing from the owner of the gas station. Not cool. I'd imagine they have enough to deal with the credit card fees and credit card fraud (chargebacks) as it is.

#25 snakesonaplane

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Posted 21 June 2008 - 10:43 AM

This is a common problem in ethics when it comes to any aspect of hacking.

In many ways, or at least in some demented way in my head, this makes a great parallel to some of the issues faced by people who like to get out from the computer lab and into the city for some exploration. I have definitely had a girlfriend or two hook her arm underneath mine with force because I was veering in the direction of an unlocked kiosk that some employee had neglected to re-secure. Although all I wanted to do in these situations was poke around and maybe take some pictures with my camphone, the ethical dillemma didn't occur to me until later: if I was seen on camera exploiting even the most benign of security holes, that employee could lose their job. Were they to expect that they had someone with a superior understanding of their systems hanging around in their stores looking for an opportunity to gain access? Not really. These people are underpaid and unfortunately, if I might make a sweeping broad generalization, undereducated. They're not being so much lazy as they just lack the foresight to see the implications. I, on the other hand, can see from over a decade of self education from internet newsgroups, zines and community just how much of an opportunity this is for a hacker. But perhaps, just perhaps, the implications of exploiting the physical security vulnerabilities in regards to the person whose simple mistake it might have been may elude me.

It is that nagging girlfriend or overcautious best friend (also known as noob) who can sometimes save us from our overzealous selves.

Man, I missed this place. Intelligent discourse isn't exactly... rampant on the internet these days.


Very well stated. Many of the exploratory types often lack the foresight to think of the consequences. We don't mean any harm; we're just too occupied with curiosity to think of what could potentially result.




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