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#1 snapple

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Posted 08 October 2007 - 10:34 PM

Well I looked at many options. I am intrested in starting to learn Visual Basic(VB). Would you suggest it because many people have said c++ will die. For visual basics I know you would use a excel but what compiler is good?

#2 Octal

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Posted 08 October 2007 - 10:46 PM

Whoever you are talking to smokes too much crack. Visual Basic should die, and C/C++ would be a good idea to learn.

#3 Aghaster

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Posted 08 October 2007 - 11:22 PM

Whoever you are talking to smokes too much crack. Visual Basic should die, and C/C++ would be a good idea to learn.

Agreed. Learn C/C++!

#4 chown

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Posted 09 October 2007 - 03:11 AM

Wow. I used to know someone IRL who would call it Visual Basics. That used to annoy the shit out of me.

Anyway. You are much better off learning C or C++, they both are far more powerful and far less obsolete than VB can ever hope to be.

#5 snapple

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Posted 09 October 2007 - 04:36 PM

Well how do you compile c++? Kind of a dumb question. And any books you suggest to read?

#6 Alaza

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Posted 09 October 2007 - 04:44 PM

I use Borlands compiler, which can be found here:

http://www.johnsmile...9/smiley029.htm

It's quite good for simple tasks and easy to use.

#7 snapple

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Posted 09 October 2007 - 04:49 PM

Can you post the download link because I have to sign up and wait for it

#8 iceni

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 07:57 AM

here are some links i've got bookmarked, i did have a really good C tutorial in the past, but i'm not sure if it's one of these??
http://beej.us/guide...page/index.html
http://www.cprogramm...m/tutorial.html
http://cm.bell-labs....book/index.html

#9 Ohm

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 08:52 AM

Visual Basic is not obsolete and is not such a bad place to start, if that's what you really want to do. The fact is, it really doesn't matter what you learn. The concepts can be carried over to other programming languages easily so if you ever decide to move on, you haven't wasted your time.

I suggest you start with a dynamic language like Python or Ruby. Those are both free and have free books for learning them online. Whatever you choose, make sure you have a good book to work from. Trying to learn from free online "tutorials" will just slow you down. If you can't find a decent book online for free, pick one up on amazon. Also, don't give up. Many newbies find something difficult and think this isn't the "right language" for them. It's not the language (unless you're programming in Perl, then it most certainly is the language ;), you just need to work harder. Switching languages won't help you, once you work up to the same point in your new language, you'll still be just as stuck. Pick a language and stick with it!

#10 Earl_Grey

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 03:27 PM

Visual Basic is a great way to start programming.

However, it is OS specific and your programs will be tied to Windows. It depends what your needs are!

I agree that Python is now rewarding and for visual gui representation you will find TKinter can create anything that you want.

#11 snapple

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 05:39 PM

Like I asked does anyone have the direct download link for a complier?

#12 Swerve

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 06:14 PM

Spent a long time researching which language to learn, and C++ was/is the choice for me.

#13 MrGreggie

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 08:38 PM

http://www.bloodshed.net/devcpp.html

Umm, yeah, if you are new to programming, I wouldn't recommend C++ to start. Pretty much everything that Ohm says ;-)

#14 deadc0de

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 10:42 PM

I started with Visual Basic so long ago. I loved how easy it was to get started. But that's just it. It's too easy. It lacks the power of a language like C++. Granted I learned a lot of valuable programming practices from it. Great starter language to really get you going. I'd also look into C++/CLI or C#. Both of those are real easy languages to pick up as well.


Word of warning about the Bloodshed Dev-C++ compiler. I used it for a number of years before finally calling it quits. It has special calls you need to make programs run, and doesn't always fully "cross-compatabilize" the VC files it says it can.


I'd say start with Dev-C++. But definitely consider investing in even the standard edition of Visual C++ or Visual Studio. It's way, way, way better.

Edited by deadc0de, 10 October 2007 - 10:43 PM.


#15 Panda

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Posted 11 October 2007 - 08:01 AM

This is a decent book to start off with if you're looking for books to buy

#16 Ohm

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Posted 11 October 2007 - 09:26 PM

If you're going to buy a book, make sure you check out half.com or maybe ebay first. If these are available to you where you live, you can walk away with obscenely expensive books (especially text books that normally cost $100) for almost nothing.

As for your "how to compile" question, the book should cover it. Something like "The C Programming Language" won't, but many newer, more modern and more complete books do. For a compiler on Windows, Dev-C++ is acceptable. However, Microsoft gives away the express edition of their C++ IDE. That's a good place to start, but make sure you also install the platform SDK. This extra step might seem a bit confusing, C++ is C++, right? Microsoft has their own C++ compiler for .net as well as a native compiler. You want a native compiler, and for that you want the platform SDK.

A quick google brings this link up. These are instructions on how to set up Visual C++ Express Edition with the platform SDK. I know this sounds odd and maybe confusing, but this really is the best option for free C++ programming on Windows.




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