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#1 gloomer

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Posted 13 August 2007 - 11:02 PM

How do you modify/scan/mess around with barcodes? I've always been curious about this, but never tried it.

Is the barcode also used to prevent shoplifting? For instance, if it's not deactivated by the cashier, the alarm system will be triggered once you walk out.

What kind of protection do they have against shoplifters in this sense?

#2 livinded

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 01:24 AM

The barcodes aren't used to prevent shoplifting, they are used for inventory. Basically when a product comes in it gets scanned and stored in the stores database with a name, price, etc. When you go to the register they can't the barcode for that product which tells the cash register what the product is and how much is costs. There are barcode fonts out there so that you can make your own and barcode readers really aren't that expensive.

#3 I_Eat_Childrenz

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 01:41 AM

Yeah. They don't use barcodes for shoplifting. There are these little white tabs maybe a quarter inch thick, or less, that have strips of metal inside, that they stick on, or inside of the packaging to prevent shoplifting. When the metal strips pass through a magnetic field,if they are not deactivated, they will set off the alarms.

#4 bcrscahh198987

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 02:32 AM

Nothing special about bar codes.

#5 xGERMx

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 09:43 AM

Posted Image
This was dugg yesterday...

#6 livinded

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 09:49 AM

Oh cool, thanks!

#7 The_STDstroyer

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 09:57 AM

I am trying to remember what issue of 2600 had a whole thing about barcodes and how you can make uor own, put them on stickers and put them on products you want and then go through a self chckout line and not pay so much for what you got. Pretty neat if you ask me.

#8 LUCKY_FUCKIN_CHARMS

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 07:02 PM

I am trying to remember what issue of 2600 had a whole thing about barcodes and how you can make uor own, put them on stickers and put them on products you want and then go through a self chckout line and not pay so much for what you got. Pretty neat if you ask me.

its not quite as simple as this. basically all a barcode or SKU (stock keeping unit) is, is a number, if you look at most barcodes there is a number directly below. the purpose of putting it in barcode form is so that you can scan it easily with certain devices without having to enter in the entire number, this prevents dyslexic fools from entering wrong digits and fucking up inventory and other infos. im pretty sure that once the barcode is scanned in a register for example the item number that the barcode represents is then compared to the item number in the stores database, and info such as product name, price, and whatever other info the store wants to pop will show in the register. for example if a store wants the register to ask for ID whenever someone purchases booze. simply making your own barcode and slapping it on over the existing one will do you no good. because all the barcode is, is a number, nothing more. now you could copy barcodes from cheaper merchandise and slap it on something more expensive, but thats basically just tag switching. anyone can do that. in order for the actual price to be changed for a certain SKU, it must first be updated in the store/company database, other wise you will generate a BS barcode that the registers wont recognize anyways. just like if you take an item back for return at a store that dosnt carry that item, when they go to scan it then nothing will come up. no price, no name, no nada.

#9 operat0r

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Posted 15 August 2007 - 05:41 AM

I had a great dynamic flash block buster free rental script :) there only a few main barcode 'fonts' so get yer fav barcode make a nice flash script that just adds a month or two to the date and wala !

???

I walked by a shoe store and it had some strange barcodie black boxes like it was some kind of dynamic price tag .. maybe ? I just remember a black little box thing attached to it and a LCD maybe ? and then a tiny barcode on the side ... I was with my GF so I had to not lose her .... I tend to find something *shinny* then I look and shes gone :( then I feel like a lost boy

??

Edited by operat0r, 15 August 2007 - 05:46 AM.


#10 xGERMx

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Posted 15 August 2007 - 09:02 AM

I am trying to remember what issue of 2600 had a whole thing about barcodes and how you can make uor own, put them on stickers and put them on products you want and then go through a self chckout line and not pay so much for what you got. Pretty neat if you ask me.

its not quite as simple as this. basically all a barcode or SKU (stock keeping unit) is, is a number, if you look at most barcodes there is a number directly below. the purpose of putting it in barcode form is so that you can scan it easily with certain devices without having to enter in the entire number, this prevents dyslexic fools from entering wrong digits and fucking up inventory and other infos. im pretty sure that once the barcode is scanned in a register for example the item number that the barcode represents is then compared to the item number in the stores database, and info such as product name, price, and whatever other info the store wants to pop will show in the register. for example if a store wants the register to ask for ID whenever someone purchases booze. simply making your own barcode and slapping it on over the existing one will do you no good. because all the barcode is, is a number, nothing more. now you could copy barcodes from cheaper merchandise and slap it on something more expensive, but thats basically just tag switching. anyone can do that. in order for the actual price to be changed for a certain SKU, it must first be updated in the store/company database, other wise you will generate a BS barcode that the registers wont recognize anyways. just like if you take an item back for return at a store that dosnt carry that item, when they go to scan it then nothing will come up. no price, no name, no nada.


I think you're missing the point of what The_STDstroyer was saying;
He isn't saying to do this on a regular register (which you could if you were feeling brave/stupid), he is saying to do this on a self check-out.
People who watch the self checkouts usually monitor four at a time (Wal-Mart, Kroger) if they're even at there kiosk at all (most of the time they just walk off until someone has a problem).
That being said, if you swap the barcode of what you're buying with the barcode of a cheaper model (same brand) you'll probably fly under the radar.
The key is to not get greedy and make big price differences.
Be subtle and if all else fails say the barcode was already on there.

Edited by xGERMx, 15 August 2007 - 09:02 AM.


#11 Abhayaa

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Posted 15 August 2007 - 09:37 AM

I think you're missing the point of what The_STDstroyer was saying;
He isn't saying to do this on a regular register (which you could if you were feeling brave/stupid), he is saying to do this on a self check-out.
People who watch the self checkouts usually monitor four at a time (Wal-Mart, Kroger) if they're even at there kiosk at all (most of the time they just walk off until someone has a problem).
That being said, if you swap the barcode of what you're buying with the barcode of a cheaper model (same brand) you'll probably fly under the radar.
The key is to not get greedy and make big price differences.
Be subtle and if all else fails say the barcode was already on there.


It was probably easy to miss this in vector's posting (he did get it, he was just explaining why anything else would usually not work):

now you could copy barcodes from cheaper merchandise and slap it on something more expensive, but thats basically just tag switching. anyone can do that.



#12 The_STDstroyer

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Posted 15 August 2007 - 09:41 AM

I am trying to remember what issue of 2600 had a whole thing about barcodes and how you can make uor own, put them on stickers and put them on products you want and then go through a self chckout line and not pay so much for what you got. Pretty neat if you ask me.

its not quite as simple as this. basically all a barcode or SKU (stock keeping unit) is, is a number, if you look at most barcodes there is a number directly below. the purpose of putting it in barcode form is so that you can scan it easily with certain devices without having to enter in the entire number, this prevents dyslexic fools from entering wrong digits and fucking up inventory and other infos. im pretty sure that once the barcode is scanned in a register for example the item number that the barcode represents is then compared to the item number in the stores database, and info such as product name, price, and whatever other info the store wants to pop will show in the register. for example if a store wants the register to ask for ID whenever someone purchases booze. simply making your own barcode and slapping it on over the existing one will do you no good. because all the barcode is, is a number, nothing more. now you could copy barcodes from cheaper merchandise and slap it on something more expensive, but thats basically just tag switching. anyone can do that. in order for the actual price to be changed for a certain SKU, it must first be updated in the store/company database, other wise you will generate a BS barcode that the registers wont recognize anyways. just like if you take an item back for return at a store that dosnt carry that item, when they go to scan it then nothing will come up. no price, no name, no nada.


I think you're missing the point of what The_STDstroyer was saying;
He isn't saying to do this on a regular register (which you could if you were feeling brave/stupid), he is saying to do this on a self check-out.
People who watch the self checkouts usually monitor four at a time (Wal-Mart, Kroger) if they're even at there kiosk at all (most of the time they just walk off until someone has a problem).
That being said, if you swap the barcode of what you're buying with the barcode of a cheaper model (same brand) you'll probably fly under the radar.
The key is to not get greedy and make big price differences.
Be subtle and if all else fails say the barcode was already on there.

Thats exactly what I meant. Making your own barcode based on something cheaper. One possible implementation would be to get something like a giant thing of hawaiian punch and put on it the price tag for one of the small bottle. saves you about 4 dollars, but it still would show up as hawaiian punch. the only way it would arouse suspicion is if you had a particularly scrutinizing monitor person who would actually see if all the prices matched. I have never seen that, but it's still a possiblity.

#13 Abhayaa

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Posted 15 August 2007 - 09:45 AM

Unless you want to create those labels by duplicating the cheaper items EXACTLY (ie scanning them in using a computer scanner or something) you really should stick with swiping the labels from other products if you absolutely insist on doing this. Especially since some labels these days are printed with a magnetic ink.

[EDIT: If you get caught doing this, the penalties would be much worse than shoplifting, btw]

Edited by Abhayaa, 15 August 2007 - 09:46 AM.


#14 The_STDstroyer

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Posted 15 August 2007 - 09:55 AM

Unless you want to create those labels by duplicating the cheaper items EXACTLY (ie scanning them in using a computer scanner or something) you really should stick with swiping the labels from other products if you absolutely insist on doing this. Especially since some labels these days are printed with a magnetic ink.

[EDIT: If you get caught doing this, the penalties would be much worse than shoplifting, btw]

what would they be classified as? tampering with store inventory?




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