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First time reccomendation


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#1 Criel

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Posted 18 July 2007 - 11:54 AM

I really want to try to hack something little. I'm fairly fluent in Java, HTML, and VB.

What would you guys recommend I do?

#2 ansichart

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Posted 18 July 2007 - 12:14 PM

<sarcasm>
H4xx0r a Gibson!!1one
</sarcasm>

Well, if you want to improve on your hacking skills, learn a programming language other than Visual Basic, such as C or C++. Another good thing to learn is assembly (I suggest getting a book for this one).

And if you just want to jump in right into the hacking part, check out hackthissite.com

#3 Criel

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Posted 18 July 2007 - 12:17 PM

Now, C/C++ are similar to Java aren't they? So, it wouldn't be totally new to me, would it?

#4 Remix

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Posted 18 July 2007 - 01:11 PM

No i believe they are much different however a prior knowledge of 1 language will increase your learning ability for the other just as multilingual people pick up new languages fairly easily.

#5 systems_glitch

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Posted 18 July 2007 - 01:24 PM

No i believe they are much different however a prior knowledge of 1 language will increase your learning ability for the other just as multilingual people pick up new languages fairly easily.


The syntax is /similar,/ but a lot of the time this just leads to confusing the two. They're different enough to cause problems, especially if you're not doing Object Oriented C++. I've had to take both for college requirements, fortunately not at the same time.

Having taken a course in Java /did/ help me in trying to teach myself Object Oriented C++ though -- I think a general knowledge concerning how Object Oriented programming works helps when trying to pick up any object oriented language, though. Python code certainly makes more sense now.

#6 Abhayaa

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Posted 23 July 2007 - 12:56 AM

I really want to try to hack something little. I'm fairly fluent in Java, HTML, and VB.

What would you guys recommend I do?


HARDWARE, OSes and NETWORKING: You might want to call or go down to your nearest goodwill or salvation army... Usually they have really cheap crappy old desktop PCs for $25 or $50. Get one or two. Download one or two different operating systems, install them, learn how to internetwork them. Experiment with the security settings on each -- first to see if you can figure out how everything works then to figure out how to get in even if you shouldn't be able to. Monitor your own network traffic. Monitor open wifi network traffic. For that you'll want something like WireShark if you're just starting out, since it's so userfriendly (there are a ton of other programs out there too; this is just the one I run because IDE-wise it's fairly easy to use, and I got given a free copy to beta test ages ago). Turn off services one by one til you get it as lean as you can.

LANGUAGES: If you want to hack, my lingual suggestions are: learn with and fiddle with C. You might find learning ruby, and/or perl helpful. Learn shell scripting -- zsh, tcsh, ksh. Since you seem to have an interest in Web stuff, you probably want to look at stuff like css, php and the like. You should probably learn x86 assembly -- there are some good books out there for that. I'd recommend Petzold's "Code" and Duntemann's Assembly Language Step-by-Step: Programming with DOS and Linux (last I checked, it was in its 2nd or 3rd edition) [ his webpage is http://www.duntemann.com/assembly.htm , btw -- some great info available ]. They're a little starter-oriented, and I don't know how much "fairly fluent" connotes. You might feel more comfortable with a more dense book like Blum's "Professional Assembly Language" or something more middle-ground like Neveln's "Linux Assembly Language Programming". If you're feeling feisty, you might want to consider smushing C and asm together with some other helpful hackish architecture information and read Paul's "SPARC Architecture, Assembly Language Programming, and C (2nd Ed)" at some point. Obviously it'd work best if you have a Solaris box of some sort to work on, with that book.

BEYOND: Install older versions of operating systems with known exploits. Learn how to make those work. When you have them working, since you know how to program some already, run a debugger in the background and watch it as it happens. You'll probably want to learn some assembly by now, even if it's just basic stuff -- you'll probably need it if you plan on doing a lot of exploit research. For debugging, OllyDebugger is great if you're on Win32, along with a number of tools from sysinternals (which is now, pitiably, owned by Microsoft, grumble) and programs like wdasm32. You might want to experiment with vmware if you don't have the spare hardware (being cautious, of course, of your current data and settings -- backups are a good habit, but you probably already know this. You don't seem that green :).) Once you have gotten into some of your older installed OSes and have analyzed how they work, experiment with trying to recreate one or more of the same programs on your own from scratch. Once you get that working, you'll find it a whole lot easier than just jumping in and trying to write something completely new. A lot of the current exploits that are circulating nowadays are firmly built upon older stuff.

Whether you want to use whatever you learn/create on your own systems or someone else's is your own call -- but obviously(?) I don't encourage anything questionable.

Some of this list is probably not in correct order, but I'm basically throwing out my stream-of-consciousness on the subject... You probably get the idea.

Oh yeah -- and don't forget to have fun!

/ab




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