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An update in op-diverting news


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#1 Royal

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Posted 15 January 2007 - 06:50 AM

Nobody's been posting much in the Old Skool Phreaking forum for a while now, so I figured I'd make a new thread about the state of op-diverting right now. But before I do that, I just want to annouce that my red boxing article finally got published in this Winter 2007 issue of 2600 magazine (thanks for letting me know I-baLL)! It's called "Red Boxing Revealed for the New Age", and should have already hit the bookstores by now.

Much thanks to all those who helped me with the payphone information in other Telco territories that were too far away from me, namely Qwest and SBC. And to all those who supported me along the way; if it wasn't for your support this article wouldn't have been as big as it is. Hopefully I have included all of you in the shouts.
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Anyway, to get into the topic of this thread, I'll start with AT&T. I have some good news and some bad news, and I'll start with the bad news:

It seems that the Carrier Access Code (CAC) 101-6746 + 0 doesn't give you the AT&T automated operator anymore. The actual carrier that owns this CAC isn't AT&T, but instead a CLEC that used to route you to an AT&T operator when you dialed the zero at the end. This was useful when the other AT&T CAC's, such as 101-0288 and 101-0732, restricted you from dialing toll-free numbers recently, although it either passed your phone number to the called party, or gave you a reorder half the time. So unless you live in one of the few areas where you can still op-divert through AT&T, it's completely obsolete now. Although, AT&T was never a trustworthy company to begin with, and it shows now more than ever.....

Now for some positive news: Verizon Long Distance operators will now allow you to call toll-free numbers if you say you're "special". (Note that I am referring to the Long Distance operators, and not the local operators, since the local ops have always allowed this.) The downside to this: they pass your phone number to the called party. However, this is very useful on payphones when trying to bypass payphone surcharges and restrictions. The reason is because although the CPN is the phone number you're calling from, the ANI-II will always pass as '23', instead of the payphone's '27', or '70'. The CAC's for Verizon Long Distance are 101-6963 + 0, and 101-5483 + 0. To remember these easily, go by their spelling:

* 101-6963 = 101-NYNE (NYNEX without the "X", which is what Verizon formerly was in certain areas)

* 101-5483 = 101-5GTE (GTE is what Verizon formerly was in other areas)

Depending on where you live, only one of these two CAC's will work for you; try them both.

That about does it for this topic. Happy Trails as always!

Edited by Royal, 17 January 2007 - 10:45 AM.


#2 I-baLL

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Posted 15 January 2007 - 11:19 PM

http://www.nanpa.com...ICDMasterReport

NANPA'S list of CICs.

#3 yourface

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Posted 16 January 2007 - 06:18 AM

does this have something to do with the "fearness"
haha
good job man, I know you was OCD'ing on that article for a while now.
Glad you got it out.
peace

#4 Royal

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Posted 17 January 2007 - 10:37 AM

Speaking of that yourface, it should be noted that if you are on a payphone and need to dial a toll-free number that the payphone's firmware restricts, using these CACs will prove very useful. The phone number of the payphone will pass to the toll-free number, but, this can be to your advantage sometimes. One simple example would be if you needed to call Tellme's voice portal at 1-800-555-TELL, and wanted it to know your (the payphone's) phone number, and therefore your general area for easier weather or taxi information. Hell, I've saved myself a few times by having Tellme tell me what city I'm in by going to the nearest payphone and saying "Weather" or "Taxi".

Also, I forgot to mention that if you still want to op-divert on a Bell-operated payphone without passing its phone number, you can still use the local operator when you dial 0 (at least in Verizon territory). If the firmware of the payphone interferes and dials something different on the CO's dialtone, make sure you bypass the firmware first. If you're unaware of how to do this, try using the Vertical Service Code method that I mention in my article that just came out, which is as simple as dialing, for example, 1167 before the 0. You may also want to try dialing # immediately after the 0, which I recently found out works on older modeled Verizon Hybrids.

#5 ThoughtPhreaker

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 12:41 AM

Nice to see some activity in these parts of the board :) . Anyway, *0 will commonly reach the real operator on some COCOTs; I've only tried it on a hybrid once, since they're not in my area, but it should work.

#6 dual

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Posted 20 January 2007 - 09:59 AM

Just read it. By far the best article in the issue. :voteyes:

#7 lambda

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Posted 20 January 2007 - 04:37 PM

I'm a phone n00b, but from what I understand, 101-0288-0 no longer works as "op diverting" in terms of hiding your number, and the others you mentioned don't hide your number either, is there still an easy way to op divert that will hide (or at least change) the number you are calling from?

#8 Royal

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 04:14 AM

I'm a phone n00b, but from what I understand, 101-0288-0 no longer works as "op diverting" in terms of hiding your number, and the others you mentioned don't hide your number either, is there still an easy way to op divert that will hide (or at least change) the number you are calling from?


Also, I forgot to mention that if you still want to op-divert on a Bell-operated payphone without passing its phone number, you can still use the local operator when you dial 0 (at least in Verizon territory).

I'm quoting myself above because that's where I explained how you can still anonymously op-divert without passing your phone number to the called party. Of course, there's no need to use a payphone when doing this. And as always, test the call on an ANAC or two first, much like you would test a proxy on a site that reads your IP address.

#9 Royal

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Posted 04 June 2007 - 10:08 PM

I just want to add an update to this thread: There's another CAC that gives you a Verizon local operator:

101-0698 followed by 0 + NPA-NXX-XXXX.

Back so many years ago I got a Verizon operator or representative (I forget which) to provide me a CAC for Verizon local. At that time, dialing just 101-0698-0 worked fine. However that stopped working long ago, and still won't work today. Well last night I scanned through an updated list of Verizon's CICs, and the CIC for 0698 worked in the above format as a CAC. I had completely forgotten that 0-NPA-NXX-XXXX also gave you a local operator on Verizon's network. The NPA-NXX you dial doesn't matter, just tell the operator you're dialing a different number if she asks. Of course say you're "special" as usual, and gove up the toll-free number. This gives you Verizon LOCAL ops, so this won't pass your number to the called party like the Verizon long distance ops do. And remember to test this shit on an ANAC when in doubt!

I haven't tested 101-0698 on a payphone yet, so I'll edit this post with the answer soon. The Verizon long distance CACs should still work on them though, and also pass the payphone's number. So anyway, here's a review of all the CACs you can use:

EDIT: I just tried it today; you can most definitely use it on payphones!

Verizon Long Distance:
101-6963 (NYNE) - passes your number
101-5483 (5GTE) - passes your number

Verizon Local:
101-0698-0-NPA-NXX-XXXX

Edited by Royal, 06 June 2007 - 01:02 AM.


#10 unity

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Posted 06 June 2007 - 06:43 PM

I would *love* to go to Verizon territory and play with this stuff. It sounds very interesting! Thanks for the updates, Royal. I read them! :)




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