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#1 4b50lut3 1337

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Posted 11 December 2006 - 02:10 AM

which one is easiest or was easiest for you to learn?
i cant decide which one to start with

#2 vardor

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Posted 11 December 2006 - 02:47 AM

Most people start with python. http://www.python.org/download/ and theres tons of documentation on it online.
Then most go to C then to C++, then perl. Start where you like in the chain or go for another not on my list, but a bit of advice. The more you try to skip ahead the harder it is to learn, and the more confused you get. Eventually you end up back at square one with python.

#3 xof7

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Posted 11 December 2006 - 03:35 AM

I started out using the command line and writing batch files for nearly everything. Then I started using vb6. I've been using vb6 for a few years and now i am slowly going towards c++

#4 Ohm

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Posted 11 December 2006 - 04:18 AM

I would start with Ruby, and that's not just because I'm a Rubyist. It's a good alternative to Python, which can be inconsistent at times. There's no shortage of books on how to program with Ruby, so that's not a problem. The only hurdle there really is to learning Ruby or Python is object oriented concepts. In addition to books on your chosen language, you should seek out a book that teaches object oriented concepts well. I recommend Bruce Eckel's "thinking in" series, which are free dowloads on mindview.net. Strive to understand all concepts, don't get hung up on memorizing syntax and method names. Concepts is the most important part in the beginning.

#5 4b50lut3 1337

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Posted 11 December 2006 - 05:11 PM

thanks a lot...i'll check into everyone's recommendatoins

#6 m3747r0n

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Posted 12 December 2006 - 02:40 AM

VB is the easiest.

#7 n3xg3n

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Posted 12 December 2006 - 06:36 PM

VB6 is dead easy to learn, but it teaches rather bad habits when moving into another language, even though i got started on C++ I took two years to do vb6 and get involved in a few big VB projects, now it is very hard for me to move back to C++ ( I'm slowly breaking the habits i've acquired through vb )

#8 Ohm

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Posted 12 December 2006 - 07:59 PM

There's just no reason to learn VB anymore either, so you can avoid the whole thing altogether. I've never coded anything seriously with VB, but from the little I've seen, it's something to avoid. For example, VB does a number of things to prevent people from getting "confused" like starting array indecies (indexes?) at 1 instead of 0. All this does is confuse the hell out of anyone else reading the code. To make matters worse, you can start arrays from 1 or 0, it's configurable. In short, you just never really know where your arrays start.

The entire philosophy behind VB is broken. You don't conform the language to the programmer's misconcetions and lack of understanding. If you do that, you're doomed from the getgo.

#9 BigBrother

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Posted 12 December 2006 - 08:39 PM

I started with C++ then went to java.

#10 Dr. Z2A

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Posted 13 December 2006 - 02:15 AM

I would actually recommend starting with a more difficult language. I'd say to start with C++ because C/C++ is somewhat of a standard and once you are able to code well in C++ everything else you learn (besides assembly) seems a easier. I originally learned C and when I learned a second language (python) it came very easily to me after coding in C for about a year. I would say C++ instead of C because C++ will get you working with object oriented programming.

#11 Ohm

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Posted 13 December 2006 - 03:07 AM

I probably wouldn't start with C++. It's not the easiest language to learn, especially if you're just staring on OO concepts at the same time. The dynamic languages (Python, Ruby) are much more forgiving and easier to learn (just plain easier to code with), if you're going to start with a high-level language, you might as well start as high as you can go.

#12 woodys_world69

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Posted 13 December 2006 - 03:33 AM

turbo pascal FTW!

#13 n3xg3n

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Posted 13 December 2006 - 02:54 PM

To make matters worse, you can start arrays from 1 or 0, it's configurable.


Actually they can start with whatever you want

Public MyArray(4 To 8) As Integer
defines an int array with indexes 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 :P

Don't Learn VB6 first! if at all!

#14 5imp7y

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 05:56 PM

which one is easiest or was easiest for you to learn?
i cant decide which one to start with

all depens what you want to do. I taught myself the basics of html with microsopht frontpage and a sit that closed down call funky chicked. Now there is a student site called web monkey. I am still learning C++ and q basic. VB is really fun cause you can do it in work. I like to use programming languages that you dont need a program for. Try html for you basic web design then moove to java, then you can use programs or learn xml which is alot like html and learn dhtml all the same thing in a way thought.

#15 Irongeek

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 06:03 PM

Most varieties of BASIC are easy, but some teach you very bad habits.
http://basic.mindteq.com/

#16 512dev

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Posted 16 December 2006 - 09:12 AM

I started with batch files, then MS-DOS Qbasic, then assembly language (yes, I know, big skip ahead...shoulda done C first...)

But don't do that

I think a natural progression is:

1) Start with a very high level language, like Python or Ruby (dare I say a traditional BASIC? [not visual]), just to get yourself acquainted with the logic

2) Move onto something like Java or dare I say Pascal

3) Finally, explore things like C, C++, etc. If you feel daring, go with Assembly language.

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#17 thcParadise

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Posted 16 December 2006 - 09:28 PM


I started to program is c initially before I knew what a kernel and linux was all about. I found it a little too difficult for my taste, because of the semantics. I spent time learning about what different languages were out there, and what was their primary purpose(if any). There's a radio show out of the UK that is very useful in distinguishing the usefulness of most languages, high-level & low-level explaining why they are called so, etc.
My advice is that you start with PERL. If you run linux, you have perl most likely and if not, then go to activestate.com and download activeperl for windows. At search.cpan.org you can search for modules that extend the functionality of the language to fit your particular need. Another plus with perl is that you do not have to explicitly define variables as perl distinguishes numbers from strings transparently.
check out lifeinhex - Programming Rails


#18 larsrohdin

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 03:11 AM

I started out with C++ and it was abit much at first, but it gets easier. I then moved on to Python. If I could start over I would have done it the other way around, so that my advice; python then C++. After you have mastered them, any language should be quite easy.

#19 Octal

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 10:01 AM

http://catb.org/~esr...to.html#skills1
Everything you need to know, right there.

#20 Ohm

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 06:02 PM


My advice is that you start with PERL. *snip* Another plus with perl is that you do not have to explicitly define variables as perl distinguishes numbers from strings transparently.


Perl is really not really a beginner's language. It would be OK, but there are some big reasons to stay away from it in the beginning (or at all). It's so easily abused (and it is regularly abused which seems to be acceptable behavior in the Perl community, in fact it's encouraged), that it's difficult to tell the good code from the bad. Newbies that learn from code can pick up some pretty bad habits brought on by lazy (or "clever" as it's called in the Perl community) Perl programmers. Also, "there's more than one way to do ti" is not terribly useful to someone just learning their first paradigm, and neither is CPAN.

And the thing about declaring variables is really not an issue. Learning to declare your variables is such a small hurdle, it shouldn't be a deciding factor in choosing a language.




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